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What happens to Jupiter

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#1 Roragi

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 11:39 AM

These last two months when there is little time to leave my dark sky, I spend some time looking at Jupiter. This season I see it really weird, I see the equatorial bands with a dull color and the rest of the planet equally and the details are very bad.

 

I'm not a planetary expert at all, can anyone tell if I've seen this too? Maybe it's further from the earth?

 

The seeing was not good in this observation, but I really know what it looks like when it's bad with instability.



#2 Barlowbill

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 11:45 AM

My views so far this year shows very little color and barely visible banding.  Moons were clearly visible but just bright little dots.  While I do not know how far Jup is currently from earth, It lives between about 365 and 601 million miles away.  Might be a few years until it gets close again. 



#3 Garyth64

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 11:57 AM

It is also the lowest in the sky that it's been in years.


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#4 happylimpet

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 12:05 PM

Its essentially the same distance that it is at opposition (which it is this week) every year.

 

However it is, as said above, very low in the southern sky, which doesnt help us northerners.

 

Also, the SEB (southern equatorial belt), one of the two main belts, is quite pale and doing some odd things, as is the GRS - worth reading up about. Also the equatorial zone is quite dark this year which reduces apparent contrast.


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#5 lcdisease

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 12:06 PM

It is also the lowest in the sky that it's been in years.

That's the problem. It is low in the sky and because of that our atmosphere has higher negative impact. You'd need to try to watch it when is highest in the sky.


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#6 Roragi

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 12:25 PM

I think I remember that in 2010 or 2011 I was in the summer zodiac band, but I do not remember it as dark. Finally thank you for clarifying my doubts. Yes, the big red spot is really sad. Low height in the ecliptic and added to a long distance, I take note.


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#7 dscarpa

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 12:20 PM

 I've had some sessions recently with my IM715D mak, WO ZS110 and C9.25 with very good conditions  using 320X-400X. I think Jupiter isn't showing as much fine detail this time around all the more so on the non Red  Spot side.  Sadly we've had way too many nights socked in by the marine layer lately but next week is looking better! David


Edited by dscarpa, 14 June 2019 - 12:21 PM.


#8 aeajr

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 02:03 PM

I have a new 12" Dob and the two nights I have had with Jupiter in the last week were not spectacular.   Under 200X for best view.   Super bright but not a lot of detail above 200X.  I do note that an 82A filter seems to be helping a little. 

 

In prior years Jupiter was higher and I had a few nights with an 8" Dob where 300X was fantastic.  

 

I presume it is due to the low altitude that the views are not up to my expectations. 



#9 Lola Bruce

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 02:38 PM

Too low in the sky. You are looking through a great deal of our atmosphere that is degrading the image.

 

Bruce


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#10 SabiaJD

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Posted 15 June 2019 - 09:56 AM

My first view of the season was fairly good, even with the low altitude.  Did see difference in between reddish to brownish color of the EZ and NEB , SEB. 

 

SPR region dull blueish. Witness the shadow transit of Io and Ganymede, and at times a small bright white spot in the SEB.

 

9.5 in. F/15 A.Clark 172x

 

Hope the seeing continues to be this good.

 

John 



#11 epee

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 08:16 AM

So far, my few views of Jupiter have been poor. I'm blaming the weather and Jupiter's current position in the sky.



#12 TiSaph

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 10:22 AM

Its essentially the same distance that it is at opposition (which it is this week) every year.

However it is, as said above, very low in the southern sky, which doesnt help us northerners.

Also, the SEB (southern equatorial belt), one of the two main belts, is quite pale and doing some odd things, as is the GRS - worth reading up about. Also the equatorial zone is quite dark this year which reduces apparent contrast.


Do you have good source to read about this, a about current events on Jupiter?

#13 SabiaJD

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 11:45 AM

Do you have good source to read about this, a about current events on Jupiter?

 

You can start with these on Observing Jupiter and recent Images.

 

http://www.alpo-astr...ter/jupnet.html

 

  http://www.alpo-astr...Apparition-2019

 

http://www.britastro.org/jupiter/

 

http://alpo-j.asahik...est/Jupiter.htm


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#14 TiSaph

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 12:04 PM

Thanks, these are great!



#15 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 01:21 PM

Links to information on GRS transits and Galilean satellite events can be found online at https://www.skyandte...upiter-almanac/ and https://www.projectp....com/jevent.htm

 

Dave Mitsky



#16 SabiaJD

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 10:20 AM

I have not yet been able to view the GRS on Jupiter.

 

When I compared software for the GRS transits  (S&T online Calculator, Guide 9,  Jupiter 2 (setting the GRS longitude for 309 degrees), and I notice  a difference  between S &T online calculator and the other software or listings.  Even S&T magazine's list of the GRS transit differ with their own online calculator. 

 

The online calculator gives a fair time but not accurate.  I would start observers earlier than S&T  GRS online calculator if you wish to observe the mid transit of the GRS.



#17 Special Ed

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 02:32 PM

I don't know how often S&T updates their calculator with the GRS drift.  Currently the GRS is centered at about System II 312 degrees.  I confirmed this empirically by looking at Chris Go's image for 16 June.  You can check WINJupos, WIMP, or the app that S&T has for Jupiter's moons to see when that CM is coming up.



#18 SabiaJD

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 07:47 AM

 I used System  II 309 degrees, as listed in WinJupos GRS drift Chart .


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#19 Asbytec

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 10:07 AM

I got my first few looks at Jupiter in a couple years. It has changed quite dramatically.

The North polar region seems kind of quiet. The North EQ belt seems normal, or maybe darker. The EQ zone is very prominent tawney hue with a thin white zone running through it. The festoons seem to have lost much of their blue hue, at least visually to my eye. They look to be a darker tawny color and some of them appear quite prominent. It was mentioned above how there are some contrast effects, I suspect so.

The South EQ belt is not its normal self. Its divided into a few light and dark streaks. The southern edge is very irregular and lumpy. I have not seen the GRS, yet, but it looks to be spinning off large chunks. Is it evolving? Disappearing?

Will Jove reinvent itself after hundreds of years of sporting a super anticyclone larger than our entire planer? Will we appreciate Jove if so and we get to witness this, and the comet impact decades ago?

Oval BA seems normal, as do some minor zones in the South polar region along with an occasional small white oval. The biggest changes seem to be in the EQ zone and SEB. Makes me wonder if we're witnessing Jovian atmosphere going through some significant changes. Maybe permanently so.

But if history is a guide, then maybe not. Jove occasionally goes through some fading belts, then gets back to normal. This event seems much broader than any I remember seeing. Dramatic though, either way.

Edited by Asbytec, 19 June 2019 - 10:32 AM.


#20 David Gray

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 11:36 AM

The last SEB Fade was in 2010/11..........

 

http://alpo-j.asahik...10/j100809z.htm  ....

 

The apparition images there.......... http://alpo-j.asahik...0Apparition.htm   .....wrongly headed 2009 Observations I see.......

 

Those fades are something to look forward to as the SEB Revivals are usually spectacular.  The one that apparition erupting in 2010 November and its progress is well recorded by imagers.

 

I’ve seen several; 1994 was particularly vigorous, each time there is a seeming innocuous small white spot, then an adjoining strangely shaped dark feature.  Soon after streams of light and dark spots erupt from this ‘focus’ in rapid succession over the following days and streaming in both directions along the latitude of the SEB(N).

 

A notable one in 1952 was famously depicted by Comet and Nova hunter G.E.D. Alcock with a 4” refractor..........

 

https://www.britastr...urnal_item/5752

 

The Revivals and Jupiter’s doings in general are well documented in this book...... https://archive.org/...upiter/page/n81

 

Right now: Jupiter is doing just fine doing what it does: probably long before mankind - the dinosaurs even - came along.......In short, such a dynamic atmosphere, perhaps we should not be surprised at it surprising us.............


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#21 David Gray

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 04:40 PM

Sorry mis-posted some GRS info here......blush.gif


Edited by David Gray, 19 June 2019 - 04:43 PM.


#22 Asbytec

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 06:37 PM

David, what makes this event a little different is the larger effects in the EZ and the GRS throwing off chunks of itself. But, yes, Jupiter goes through it's cycles, whatever they are. This one is a bit unique. 



#23 David Gray

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 07:14 PM

No argument re GRS Norme; but that EZ coloration pales vs the tone in the early 1960s.  When the SEB/EZ/NEB looked as one **very broad dark belt **– each being deeply ruddy was even more startling in blue light photos.  In fact that and the current EZ event are but two of several such occurrences over a good few apparitions......

 

http://articles.adsa...00467.000.html 

 

It last occurred (I think) during the 2006 apparition; tho’ imagery was not always getting a good handle on it then......... http://alpo-j.asahik...6Apparition.htm

 

As to the GRS........Rogers sums it so far...... https://britastro.org/node/18297

 

Cheers,

Dave.

**Edit: a long time to carry colours in my head; but here a rendering to give the gist of the 1962 impressions.**

JUP 1962 EZ Col.jpg

 

 

 


Edited by David Gray, 20 June 2019 - 07:58 AM.

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#24 Miranda2525

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 09:29 AM

I've been watching Jupiter & Saturn for many weeks now. I've seen a lot of detail on both planets, mainly Jupiter, as there is a lot more changing events. I've gone from 155x to 200x and up to 265x using a 10" Orion XTi. I only use my binoviewer when I view planets and the moon which I find helps see a lot more than with a single eye. I haven't even been running my fan on the back of the mirror, and I am still getting really sharply, detailed images of Jupiter & Saturn, I can just imagine what it will be like once I run the fan !

 

Jupiter or Saturn do not go any higher than 24 degrees for me. 

 

I can never go back to single-eyed viewing of planets and the moon because I have tried one eye and then I tried going back to two-eyed viewing. With two eyes and the binoviewer, I always see a lot more detail. I highly recommend it if you are a planetary enthusiast !!!

 

It is very relaxing on the eyes as well. I also sit down on my observing chair each and every time. This allows for your body to relax with some regular breathing, etc. Both the binoviewer and sitting down are a world of a difference, as opposed to standing and crouching.

 

The KEY to seeing the GRS, or changing detail on Jupiter is to wait and watch for it to come into view. Let your telescope acclimate and do it for at least 4 hours.  Wait for those "rock-steady and sharp" moments when the seeing settles. Most people are impatient and want instant gratification. 

 

It won't happen. grin.gif


Edited by Miranda2525, 20 June 2019 - 09:45 AM.


#25 Miranda2525

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 09:34 AM

These last two months when there is little time to leave my dark sky, I spend some time looking at Jupiter. This season I see it really weird, I see the equatorial bands with a dull color and the rest of the planet equally and the details are very bad.

 

I'm not a planetary expert at all, can anyone tell if I've seen this too? Maybe it's further from the earth?

 

The seeing was not good in this observation, but I really know what it looks like when it's bad with instability.

If you are using your 16", mask it off.




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