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What happens to Jupiter

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#26 Roragi

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 10:48 AM

If you are using your 16", mask it off.

I have watched Jupiter for my scope of 4'' and 16'' and 20'' of a friend. Any of them have given me a dirty image and bad details. Maybe because of its low height? I do not know, I've seen Jupiter in the summer ecliptic and it looked as bad as this time.



#27 David Gray

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:09 PM

At 54.7ºN here –  Jupiter & Saturn getting to 13º max currently, but still getting, with persistence, some fair views time to time – and I see folks with them up to 20º higher not happy.....WHAT???......I would love to have them even 5º higher......

 

An updated quote of what I said some weeks ago.....

 

“Since January a lot of early rising to catch Jupiter & Saturn being in vain: some >20 (now >60 ) attempts with Jupiter has got me five (now 9) decent-seeing views (one of Saturn – now 5).  Just as well I enjoy the early hours regardless.......and don’t look – don’t see....  Systematic observing.......forget it.....but happy to be wrong.”

 

Even with a favourable/minimal jetstream I always check for ground-level turbulence (often worse in summer) by noting the flickering of distant street lights (one half to ~3 miles).  All other things being equal this turns out time and again when those are steady then the definition is usually at a usable level. Checking for street light flicker we need to be sure those distant lights are not shining through tree foliage.....!

 

Another factor with contrast; even with a steady image: at such low altitudes we are looking through a much longer path of particulates in the atmosphere affecting what I call a Crispness Factor.  In spite of catching seeing even as good as Antoniadi II that particulate-affected factor seems invariably to reduce contrast in varying degrees until planets are >25º high.

 

What seems to favour my lo-alt views is that I’m observing across miles of open countryside and the terrain sloping away steeply from about a quarter mile out.  Maybe also reducing my particulate-quotient somewhat....?


Edited by David Gray, 20 June 2019 - 12:11 PM.


#28 David Gray

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:25 PM

Just to post something more current: a sketch to convey what grabbing the best moments of lo-alt viewing can deliver– especially as it is a better ‘scan’ (digital camera); as my regular camera for this had gone kaput. 

 

Had to use my wife’s phone for those I posted on the Sketching Forum and way more tweaking than I was happy with to match the sketch. 

 

https://www.cloudyni...uper/?p=9416802   .........Post #8 on this Thread......

 

https://www.cloudyni...per-pea-souper/

 

But now with the new scanner/camera.........Dave.

JUP 2019 Jun 06 2330 II.jpg


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#29 Asbytec

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 06:26 PM

What strikes me, David, is how the festoons seem to have lost their blue hue. A contrast effect, visually at least? Or are they really not as blue as they used to be? 



#30 David Gray

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 04:08 AM

I think those NEBs projections’ hues are determined by the overlying EZ haze colours.  In fact this apparition I’ve stopped seeking a blue tint in Corel for those, and simply went into the greyer part of the Shade Box containing the judged NEB hue.  That sort of ‘honours’ the relatively cooler tones of the projections that feels right to me

 

Given the current tawny EZ hues, had the projections been intrinsically blue we might actually expect them to contrast strongly – strikingly even – being close to the inverse of that EZ cast....See blue square in the attached schematic which is Corel’s inverse of the EZ hue.  Sort of like with complementary colours in double stars.

 

Last night I caught a very striking bluish hue in the STrZ  f the GRS just as I was giving up on the seeing but came very good!!   If I get back home soon enough might get the sketch tinted for posting on Sketching tonight – or tomorrow if it’s clear tonight......tongue2.gif

 

Dave.

NEB proj.jpg


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#31 Rac19

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 05:04 AM

Its essentially the same distance that it is at opposition (which it is this week) every year.

 

However it is, as said above, very low in the southern sky, which doesnt help us northerners.

 

Also, the SEB (southern equatorial belt), one of the two main belts, is quite pale and doing some odd things, as is the GRS - worth reading up about. Also the equatorial zone is quite dark this year which reduces apparent contrast.

It’s high in the sky for us here in Sydneyfrown.gif. I took this image a month or so ago. I agree that there seems to be less contrast in the the bands. Also, the GRS is changing, it has concentric circles and the trailing bands look different to me.

Attached Files


Edited by Rac19, 21 June 2019 - 05:05 AM.


#32 Conaxian

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 02:39 AM

  Shew!  I just took my first peek at Big Jove this year and was a little disappointed.  There was no color beyond the pale cream color, there were only two obvious bands, and I detected festoons on only one of them. No GRS could be seen in my small mak.

  It was best with a 12mm EP for about 135X. Pushed higher it only got worse.  I could see almost all the detail at 65X that I could see at 135.  I did get to watch it occult one of its moons about 10:55 Eastern. Probably Io.

I estimate it was only about 25 degrees high and there is a lot of humidity, some high thin clouds, too.

Anyway, I'm glad it's murky for you other northern guys too, so I'm not really going blind after all.  wink.gif


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#33 Roragi

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 11:20 AM

This weekend I could see Jupiter in good conditions with a very decent seeing, the equatorial bands were very marked and defined, the night of Saturday even with the shadow of one of their satellites. All the details very clear. I think I've had very bad seeing these months ago to push enough power. I just wanted to record it.

 

The team was the traveler, use an eyepiece of a friend pentax XO 2.5mm.

 

Roberto


Edited by Roragi, 07 July 2019 - 11:20 AM.



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