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Need help looking for an eyepiece

eyepieces
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#1 ShotPocket

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 02:04 PM

I have an Orion Starblast 6 reflector telescope. I am trying to find a good eyepiece that would give a good, clear, and maybe slightly bigger view of planets and such. Any recommendations?

I also stumbled upon this eyepiece, will this be what I'm looking for? (Sorry I'm a noob at this stuff) https://www.amazon.c...8-1-spons&psc=1



#2 Garyth64

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 02:18 PM

Take a look at the ES 52 degree series eyepieces.

 

I believe the Orion Starblast may have come with 2 eyepieces 10mm and a 25mm and a barlow.

 

If so, do you like the views with those eyepieces?  Have you used the 10mm with the barlow? 

 

That eyepiece you mentioned may work very well.


Edited by Garyth64, 19 June 2019 - 02:29 PM.


#3 bobito

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 02:36 PM

Budget is the largest factor here. 

You'll want to be around 200-250x for the best view on planets.  In your scope that's an eyepiece in the 3.5mm range.  You can likely find a 4mm Ortho for less than $100 used, but that would have horrible eye relief.  And when you start looking at eyepieces with good eye relief around 3.5mm the prices are over $100.

Perhaps a barlow?  A 3x barlow would make the 10mm EP that came with your scope a 3.33mm and about 225x which is perfect for planets on many nights.



#4 ShotPocket

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 02:38 PM

I have good views with the 10mm, yes. 



#5 ShotPocket

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 02:52 PM

Take a look at the ES 52 degree series eyepieces.

 

I believe the Orion Starblast may have come with 2 eyepieces 10mm and a 25mm and a barlow.

 

If so, do you like the views with those eyepieces?  Have you used the 10mm with the barlow? 

 

That eyepiece you mentioned may work very well.

So this will give me a good clear look at planets up close?



#6 rkelley8493

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 03:15 PM

Hi ShotPocket, and welcome to Cloudy Nights welcome.gif

Astronomics [sponsor of CN] makes a very good eyepiece series that is reasonably priced, the Astro-Tech Paradigms [link below]. And being a member of Cloudy Nights, you will also get a discount on your purchase. The 3.2mm eyepiece would give you a magnification of 235x, high enough to see the Cassini Gap in Saturn's rings. A 5mm eyepiece would probably give you the best "resolving magnification" where the finest details can be seen while keeping an elevated level of contrast. That's when the eyepiece focal length is equal to the scope's F/number, i.e. 5mm = f/5.  6" is a good medium sized aperture, large enough to see quite a bit of detail in the planets [depending on proximity to Earth]. Jupiter & Saturn are relatively close to Earth right now, so it's a great time to start observing. They never disappoint! 

 

https://www.astronom...iece_series=478


Edited by rkelley8493, 19 June 2019 - 03:16 PM.

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#7 ShotPocket

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 03:18 PM

Hi ShotPocket, and welcome to Cloudy Nights welcome.gif
Astronomics [sponsor of CN] makes a very good eyepiece series that is reasonably priced, the Astro-Tech Paradigms [link below]. The 3.2mm eyepiece would give you a magnification of 235x, high enough to see the Cassini Gap in Saturn's rings. A 5mm eyepiece would probably give you the best "resolving magnification" where the finest details can be seen while keeping an elevated level of contrast. That's when the eyepiece focal length is equal to the scope's F/number, i.e. 5mm = f/5. 6" is a good medium sized aperture, large enough to see quite a bit of detail in the planets [depending on proximity to Earth]. Jupiter & Saturn are relatively close to Earth right now, so it's a great time to start observing. They never disappoint!

https://www.astronom...iece_series=478


Hello! So will that 6mm that I mentioned be good for a closer up view that's fairly clear?
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#8 ShaulaB

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 03:24 PM

Your 6" StarBlast telescope has a focal length of 750mm. Using a 5 mm eyepiece (or your 10mm with a 2x Barlow) would give 150x magnification. On evenings of average "seeing," it is suggested not to push magnification above 30 times the telescope's aperture in inches. So for your 6 inch, going above 180x magnification on most nights would not get you any more details into sharp focus.

The term "seeing" means the steadiness of the atmosphere. On nights with bad seeing, you will notice details on the Moon jiggle around like Jello. Where I live, nights of excellent seeing are rate. Observing when the seeing is bad will not bring good sharp, detailed views of planets to your eyes, regardless of eyepiece quality or magnification.

So getting a good quality 2X Barlow would be a way to go. Have fun this Summer with the big planets in the evening sky!

#9 rkelley8493

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 03:28 PM

Hello! So will that 6mm that I mentioned be good for a closer up view that's fairly clear?

Yea, it should. It looks like a pretty nice eyepiece, but I've never tried one. The specs look good on it though waytogo.gif And it won't be redundant because of your 10mm + 2x barlow = 5mm 



#10 sg6

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 04:46 PM

Reads the scope is 150/750 so f/5.

If you try the ES52's go for the 6.5mm for 115x. That is enough for Jupiter, I have had adaquate views at 40x. It may be enough for Saturn but a few dependancies. My memoriable view of Saturn was at 125x but that was a 4" (100mm) f/10 refractor at 125x (8mm eyepiece).

 

The ES52 at 6.5mm is 115x and an 8mm Paradigm is 93x. For Jupiter the 8mm seems more reliable.

 

More magnification may be "better" but you have to get that extra and just throwing a barlow or short eyepiece in basically doesn't mean much.

 

In theory a 5mm should work as should a 4mm, practise may be a 5mm works sometimes and a 4mm rarely. That really leaves the ES52 at 4.5mm (166x) a bit of a risk. I would try it but I have different scopes to yours.

 

Planetary viewing often means eyepieces at 1mm increments. My collection is:3.2mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, 9mm, 10mm, 11mm, 12mm. No idea why no 7mm, another gap to fill.

 

Will suggest you forget Mars, that really needs 250x for detail, and I seriously doubt you will get that immaterial of all the rules and formula that get thrown around.


Edited by sg6, 19 June 2019 - 04:47 PM.


#11 Rick17

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 08:00 PM

Hi ShotPocket, welcome to CN!

 

I have a StarBlast 6.  If you get a 2x barlow that will allow the bottom lens to unscrew, you can screw that lens into an eyepiece and get approximately 1.5x mag.  With that and the10mm and 25mm you already have, you will have maagnifications of 30,45,60,75,112, and150x.  All for the cost of about $30 (Agena has GSO shorty barlows for about that last time I looked).

 

Doing it this way will give you a good idea of which magnifications you like before you go out and spend a lot of money on an eyepiece that isn't a good fit for you.

 

I use my barlow like this all the time.  But, I don't get in as big a hurry as some who don't like to fuss around as much.  It really doesn't take much extra time.

 

If you don't have tracking on your scope it is really nice to have a wide angle eyepiece for high power (see my signature). But it gets more expensive.

 

Have Fun,  Rick



#12 Garyth64

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 09:12 PM

So this will give me a good clear look at planets up close?

With a 6mm giving you about 125X, you may find you want a little more power.

 

I recently bought a 3mm eyepiece from Explore Scientific for 60.  IMO, it's a very good eyepiece.  250x should be good for a 6" scope, if the optics are good.  ES also sells a 4.5mm, that I'm going to purchase

I have a set of the Meade 5000, and I like them very much.  The ES eyepieces are bit smaller.  Both have very good eye relief.

 

3 eyepieces.jpg

 

That ES series eyepieces are 52 degrees, and the Meades are 58.  Both are wide enough for me.


Edited by Garyth64, 19 June 2019 - 09:15 PM.


#13 MartinPond

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 10:54 PM

Looks like the Starblast 6 comes with 

  a 10mm Plossl and a 25mm Plossl.

Those Sirius Plossls have extra blacking and a field width

   of 53 degrees.    An ES 52-deg moght be a hair better,

  but it would usually be tough to tell.

A good Barlow could do a lot with 10mm and 25mm.

 

You might find the eye placement of the Expanse to be a bit annoying..

The Paradigm(or)Starguider Dual-ED or one of those nice HD-60s above

would be a comfortable bigger view.

 

.At the low-fl range, however, it's hard to know which one special power is right...

....you would end up getting multiples ($$).

because.....all kinds of ranges and sizes of targets are out there!

This is where the Barlow can help.   Even the shorties from Orion, Meade, or GSO

   are very nice and quiet now, and you can  use the optical cell for

1.5x screw-on or 2.0x with-body.



#14 SeattleScott

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 11:36 PM

Generally budget wide field eyepieces like Expanse don’t work well with fast scopes. The 6mm expanse works better than some I hear. Haven’t tried it myself. Should be fine if you keep your expectations low?

Scott

#15 epee

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 07:02 AM

Get the 6mm Expanse AND this...https://www.amazon.c...web_18702303011

 

With your existing eyepieces and the 6mm, the Barlow will give you these effective eyepiece focal lengths: 25, 12.5, 10, 6, 5, 3. That is a nice spread for all-round viewing and should keep you happy for a long while.


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#16 MartinPond

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 08:20 PM

Generally budget wide field eyepieces like Expanse don’t work well with fast scopes. The 6mm expanse works better than some I hear. Haven’t tried it myself. Should be fine if you keep your expectations low?

Scott

 

Good time to mention a factor that bends the

   valuable "don’t work well with fast scopes." adage..

 

As the eyepiece's focal length goes down in that price area (Expance, Dual-ED, etc).

   the fast-barrel performance almost always improves a lot .... due to the Barlow/Smyth front

   built into the eyepiece.  So it makes sense that a 6mm Expanse would do well

   (a 9mm does too)...    but it would also apply to other makes as well, as long as they aren't

   'simple'  (4 elements or less).  




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