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NexStar 127SLT Mak Arriving today

beginner cassegrain Celestron Maksutov eyepieces
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#1 rmcelv1

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 08:54 AM

I'm a complete newb.  And while I will probably introduce myself over on the beginner board my question is specific to my new purchase.  I've done a lot of lurking and research in the past few years before making my purchase.  I chose the 127 SLT Mak for it's portability and price point. My questions, after research, are as follows:

 

1.  Dew shield:  I know it needs one, from my reading.  It looks like I can DIY one pretty easily with Reflectix.  I'm near Seattle WA and will primarily use it during the summer but may also get it out on those rare winter nights when it's not cloudy/raining.  Just want to make sure the Reflectix will be a good way to go.

 

2.  Power source:  Which TalentCell battery pack is recommended or do you have a different recommendation?  Do I need to buy a separate cord to connect power source to scope?

 

3.  Eye pieces:  Probably the question to garner the most debate.  If I were to buy one additional eye piece to start, what would it be?  I'm leaning towards a zoom eye piece.  I'm going to try to get set up with a local astro club to try other EP.  Or should I get a set like the basic Celestron kit.  

 

4.  Go crazy.  Anything else I'm missing/need to add to my wish list?



#2 Auburn80

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 11:01 AM

3) For me, and selecting just one, I'd replace the included 9mm with a better more comfortable 7-9mm. That'll give good max power under most conditions. The included 25mm are usually decent and do fine for medium power. For a second eyepiece go long. A 32mm usually works well for lowest power in 1.25" format. I'd suggest avoiding the eyepiece kits.
My recommendations are based on a modest budget and single eyepiece selections. There are quite a few people who enjoy zooms though so maybe they can make recommendations there.

#3 Mitrovarr

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 11:22 AM

The celestron 8-24mm zoom is usually considered decent for the price. The Baader Hyperion zoom Mk4 is better but probably outside your budget.

#4 descott12

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 12:50 PM

I love my Lunt zoom eyepiece. Highly recommended but they are pricey and you could spend alot of $ on eyepieces.  But being able to zoom in and out is really great. I typically like something in the 8-10 mm range and something in the 25-30 mm range. I don't believe you need many more but I don't do a ton of visual work.

Regarding the dew shield. Yes you will most definitely need one. The reflectix will work but another function of the dewshield is to deaden/block reflections from stray light sources so you will want to line it with something like black felt for that purpose.



#5 Bean614

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 04:06 PM

Dew Shields for 5" Maks are relatively inexpensive.  Get one, and wrap it in Reflectix.  AND.... Wrap your OTA (the telescope itself) in Reflectix, as this is even more important considering your climate.  Your Mak will, then, always be ready to use, as soon as you take it out and mount it.  Steady views immediately;  no waiting for "cool down" or "attaining ambient temperature".

  Congratulations on your new scope, it's a good one, and you're going to love it on Planets!


Edited by Bean614, 20 June 2019 - 04:07 PM.

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#6 whizbang

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:08 PM

Cute little scope.  I am at the north end of Lake WA.  So far, I have had SCT,'s and Dobs.  For the SCT's I have dew shield and dew heaters.  I typically always use the shield, and, add the heater strip in cooler, damper conditions.

 

I just bought my first MAK, also a 127.  It is due in the next few days.

 

I really can't advise you on batteries.  I am old school and still use deep cycle and sealed lead acid batteries.

 

Additionally, I prefer fixed rather than zoom eyepieces.  You might want to consider a 32 or 15-18mm plossl for your next eyepiece.

 

Also, check out the SAS Seattle Astronomical Society web page.   They have awesome star parties and a great loaner program.


Edited by whizbang, 26 June 2019 - 03:15 PM.


#7 JP-Astro

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 02:21 PM

I also own a 127 Mak. I was tempted to save initially and get either 90 or 105 mm Mak but now I realize I would better get a 6" or 7" one and I'm glad I got at least a 5" version. Size matters here.



#8 Cali

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 10:05 PM

When I first got a Mak this is what was recommended. I use these pieces every night of viewing.

 

GSO 1.25" Plossl Eyepiece - 32mm

GSO 1.25" 90-deg 99% Dielectric Mirror Diagonal with Compression Ring

Orion 9x50 Right-Angle Correct-Image Finder Scope

Astrozap Dew Shield.




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