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NGC 7000, first light with the new scope, & stock D5300 h-alpha response

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#1 AstronoDon

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 09:45 AM

Finally got a presentable result using my new, first telescope (WO GT81). My fellow astrophotography friends and I are surprised at the amount of red the unmodified D5300 was able to pick up. Almost makes me wonder if it's worth modifying at all. 

 

Please offer critiques and advice for my resulting image. I am still very new to this hobby (6 months since pointing the dslr at the sky for the first time) and am learning processing tips and tricks with each imaging session. 

 

Ngc 7000 6 22 19

 

Scope: WO GT81 w field flattener

Mount: Skywatcher EQ6-r Pro

Camera: Stock Nikon D5300

Filter: Hutech IDAS LPS-D1-N5 CLS Filter

 

Lights: 61x120" Unguided

Darks: 15

Flats: 30

Bias: 15


Edited by AstronoDon, 24 June 2019 - 09:46 AM.

  • aa5te, durak, elmiko and 1 other like this

#2 fetoma

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 10:03 AM

My opinion...... get the camera modified and lose the LPS filter that diminishes your signal to noise ratio (SNR).



#3 AstronoDon

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 10:10 AM

My opinion...... get the camera modified and lose the LPS filter that diminishes your signal to noise ratio (SNR).

Modification would eliminate the need for the filter? I am in a bortle 5 site with bright cities to my north and south so unfortunately I need to deal with the light pollution. I didn't think modification would get rid of the fact that my sky is so bright that I can't do extra long exposures.



#4 elmiko

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 10:25 AM

Beautiful image, with or without a filter!! Bottom line..

Clear skies Mike



#5 AstronoDon

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 02:18 PM

Beautiful image, with or without a filter!! Bottom line..

Clear skies Mike

Thank you! Took me three tries at processing to get it to a point I liked. I think I can still do better to get more of the star colors back and bring out more of the faint dust detail.



#6 fetoma

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 03:14 PM

Modification would eliminate the need for the filter? I am in a bortle 5 site with bright cities to my north and south so unfortunately I need to deal with the light pollution. I didn't think modification would get rid of the fact that my sky is so bright that I can't do extra long exposures.

Modification increases the sensitivity by eliminating the filter in front of the sensor. The light pollution filter will make it harder to bring out those faint details you are looking for. Check out Astrobin to see what others are doing with the 5300.



#7 gcardona

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 03:34 PM

The thing about NGC7000, is that its emissions are mostly red. Even your unmodified camera will pick these up because there's not much else to pick up. If you modify it, your SNR will improve substantially, and you will pick up a lot more details that are washed out in the noise here.




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