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Meteor showers with NV

NV observing
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#1 GOLGO13

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 10:00 AM

Anyone see a meteor shower using NV? I've seen quite a few awesome meteors so far in only 2 to 3 hours of use. I'd imagine an actual shower event would be magical.
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#2 t_image

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 12:55 PM

Anyone see a meteor shower using NV? I've seen quite a few awesome meteors so far in only 2 to 3 hours of use. I'd imagine an actual shower event would be magical.

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I bet if you did not research of the history of use, before EAA intensifier DSOs and Nebula became a thing, you would find intensifiers were first seriously used in numbers by meteor observers (via video recorded observations),

[although no need for arguments as I count meteor observations as a EAA use] If you can take a screen shot you can certainly take a video.........]

as placing an intensifier in front of a video camera to record them:

https://www.imo.net/resources/metrec/

https://www.amsmeteo...ideo-observing/

 

FWIW, here's the first post on CN mentioning intensifiers for 'EAA' use: [2003]

https://www.cloudyni...fier-eyepieces/

Anyways,

the advantage Intensifiers give during a meteor show, is the ability to see telescopic meteors.

https://www.imo.net/...ic-observation/

https://www.imo.net/...vation/science/

Owning a camera that does a bit similar to an intensifier realtime,

During a shower the intensifier allows you to see the fainter meteors that are also smaller (thus the benefit of using more Focal length).

These fainter and smaller meteors are fall more abundant in number and frequency...

My favorite FL is 85mm at f/1.4...But I've seen some fun ones photobomb my viewing through my 500mm f/4.5 lens.....

 

I'm a fan though of recording telescopic meteors in video while I look up and watch for the fireballs with my own eyes!!!!

No intensifier can make the sight of a blue glowing fireball streaking across the sky better!



#3 Solar storm

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 01:11 PM

I fell asleep in a reclining chair in my backyard last year during the Persieds meteor shower.  But before that happened I saw tons of meteors with my PVS-7 that were easily missed or not able to be seen with the naked eye.  It was awesome!



#4 Eddgie

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 04:38 PM

Many more visible than with naked eye.

 

As you have seen, even on a typical night if you do a lot of 1x, you will probably see quite a few.   Also, the trails will be much longer. 

 

Now I have yet to have a meteor shower where there was a high count (hundreds per hour), but I always see more.

 

Note this as well.   While the peak night would be the best, usually the nights before and after will still be pretty rich, with more meteors than typical.   You can tell the by the radient so not just random occurrences. 


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