Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Seymour Filters for the 15x70, Eclipsmart 10x42s, or Lunt Solar 8x32s

  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 tmichaelbanks

tmichaelbanks

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 126
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2017

Posted 26 June 2019 - 06:57 PM

I'd like to have an option for casual solar observation on the cheap.  A dedicated H-alpha scope is definitely not in my budget, which I'd like to cap at $100.

 

I could order two Seymour Solar thin-film filters for my OB 15x70 Ultra.  Cost is about $85, not as quick to set up as a dedicated bino but not too bad.

 

The Celestron Eclipsmart 10x42s are dedicated porro binos, $56.50 from B&H, and can be tripod-mounted (I think).

 

The Lunt 8x32 Solar Binoculars are roofs, $80 from B&H, very compact, but not tripod-mountable.

 

At this point I think it's between the Seymour filters and the EclipSmarts.  The Seymour filters for the 15x70s would give the biggest image, but I'm concerned it might be too dim.

 

Could anyone chime in who has experience with these three options?  Again, I'd like to keep the total cost under $100.

 

Thanks!



#2 Rich V.

Rich V.

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6371
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Lake Tahoe area, Nevada

Posted 26 June 2019 - 07:16 PM

All three of the binos you refer to have similar exit pupils; 4.6mm for the 15x70s, 4.2mm and 4mm for the others.  Based on exit pupil, the 15x70s would be brightest.  If the filter density were similar between them (which I can't say), the images would also be of similar brightness.  It seems to me that 8x or 10x is pretty low magnification to see much detail; the filters on the 15x70s would seem to me to be the best choice because the image scale would be greater but with similar brightness.

 

Rich


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#3 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 310
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 27 June 2019 - 05:20 AM

I'd like to have an option for casual solar observation on the cheap.  A dedicated H-alpha scope is definitely not in my budget, which I'd like to cap at $100.

 

I could order two Seymour Solar thin-film filters for my OB 15x70 Ultra.  Cost is about $85, not as quick to set up as a dedicated bino but not too bad.

 

The Celestron Eclipsmart 10x42s are dedicated porro binos, $56.50 from B&H, and can be tripod-mounted (I think).

 

The Lunt 8x32 Solar Binoculars are roofs, $80 from B&H, very compact, but not tripod-mountable.

 

At this point I think it's between the Seymour filters and the EclipSmarts.  The Seymour filters for the 15x70s would give the biggest image, but I'm concerned it might be too dim.

 

Could anyone chime in who has experience with these three options?  Again, I'd like to keep the total cost under $100.

 

Thanks!

Hi,

 

Have you considered to make your own solar filters with the Baader Astro Solar Film? with one A4 sheet and some cardboard you can make full aperture filters and still have some material for smaller binos.

 

There is in the market a "brown" film that provides a very pleasant and contrasted image of the sun. It is sold by Intercon Spacetec in Germany, but i think can be found elsewhere.  This is by far my favorite way to observe the sun.

 

https://www.intercon...30-x-15cm-.html

 

Here is the translated description:

 

"The black / silver ICS solar film is absolutely safe for long-lasting solar observation and provides an aesthetic sun image in yellow-orange. It is therefore ideally suited for solar eclipse glasses, binoculars and telescopes up to 100x magnification. The robustness of the film against scratches remains fully intact, since still the film material provides the main filter effect. Likewise, the advantage of a dark back remains. It's no annoying back reflexes.

 

The pleasant orange-yellow sun picture can be observed for a long time fatigue-free. The optimally adapted brightness of the film prevents fatigue and generates no glare."

 

Carlos


  • Jon Isaacs likes this

#4 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 77218
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 27 June 2019 - 08:44 AM

Michael:

 

I recommend a wanted ad in the classifieds.  I have to think that there's are lots of solar filters for binos that were purchased for the 2017 eclipse and have not been used since.

 

I agree with Rich and Carlos, 15 x is better than 8 x or 10 x.. and solar filters are easily made.

 

Jon




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics