Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Why we love the orange Celestrons

  • Please log in to reply
81 replies to this topic

#1 starman876

starman876

    Nihon Seiko

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 20317
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2008
  • Loc: VA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:08 AM

Have had a good number of orange Celestrons over the years.  Have enjoyed each one.  Optics in all of them were very good.  What has been your experience?


  • bob midiri and Bonco2 like this

#2 J A VOLK

J A VOLK

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1057
  • Joined: 24 May 2006
  • Loc: So. Cal.

Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:38 AM

smooth orange OTA's on average better optically than later textured orange ones
  • Bonco2 and agmoonsolns like this

#3 B 26354

B 26354

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 793
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2017
  • Loc: Southern California semi-desert (NELM mag 5.3)

Posted 13 July 2019 - 11:12 AM

Bought my (smooth) orange C8 in '77. Its optics are exceptional, and still as clear as the day I brought it home. Motors died years ago, so I de-forked it, and it now has its own un-motorized Orion SkyView Pro. I only observe from home, so it's my G&G. I also use it for visual while doing AP. Makes those long AP sessions a pleasure. waytogo.gif


  • terraclarke and Bonco2 like this

#4 bbqediguana

bbqediguana

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 857
  • Joined: 28 Feb 2015
  • Loc: Canada

Posted 13 July 2019 - 11:35 AM

The first serious scope I ever had was a 1970’s orange tube which I got to borrow from a local scope shop (Efston). I used it for about a week and then bought a black tube C8. That orange tube started my life long love of SCTs! 😀

#5 Richard O'Neill

Richard O'Neill

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2131
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2014

Posted 13 July 2019 - 11:48 AM

The C8 has much in common with my first car, both introduced me to new wonders, fondly remembered 


  • bbqediguana likes this

#6 highfnum

highfnum

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4508
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2006
  • Loc: NE USA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 12:09 PM

great  scope here are my reasons

 

like you can see Tharsis volcano region on mars

small  clouds on Jupiter

clouds on venus (UV light) 

 

mrs0918.jpg

 

Capture 7_8_2018 9_15_03 PMc8red.jpg

 

venc8uv2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Scott in NC, deepwoods1, terraclarke and 6 others like this

#7 Bomber Bob

Bomber Bob

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 15470
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2013
  • Loc: The Swamp, USA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 01:03 PM

My mid-1970s orange C5 Astro makes a great display, but is actually more useful on a Polaris mount:

 

C5 Astro Restore S22 (Tabletop Wedge).jpg C5 Astro Restore S08 (OTA on Polaris).jpg

 

It's also much lighter on the Polaris, which puts it in the same g&g category as my FL80S, and both challenge my Questar.

 

This Jupiter image from 2018 only hints at what this SCT can do.  It's out of focus, and that's my fault.  I didn't wear my reading glasses.  And, my old laptop didn't have the resolution of my new one.

 

C5 - Jupiter (GRS) 20180609V03S11.jpg


  • Scott in NC, deepwoods1, bbqediguana and 3 others like this

#8 rolo

rolo

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8810
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2007
  • Loc: GA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 01:28 PM

Love all them oranges! Here's a blast from my past...

Attached Thumbnails

  • Or C8-2.jpg

  • Scott in NC, deepwoods1, terraclarke and 3 others like this

#9 rolo

rolo

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8810
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2007
  • Loc: GA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 01:33 PM

The old vs the new...

Attached Thumbnails

  • C5 009-2.jpg
  • C5 030-2.JPG

Edited by rolo, 13 July 2019 - 01:35 PM.

  • bob midiri, tim53, Scott in NC and 11 others like this

#10 starman876

starman876

    Nihon Seiko

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 20317
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2008
  • Loc: VA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 03:03 PM

I take it the C9.25 came out after the orange models stopped being made.  



#11 shredder1656

shredder1656

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1496
  • Joined: 24 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Indiana

Posted 13 July 2019 - 04:06 PM

The old vs the new...

Which one is the better of the two?



#12 highfnum

highfnum

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4508
  • Joined: 06 Sep 2006
  • Loc: NE USA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 04:45 PM

C925 came out much later  there were other c8 models in between

 

I have  c5 c8 c925 c11  

 

inch for inch my orange c8 is a bit better than my 925 however on good night you can squeeze a bit more resolution with c925 

its hard to tell since seeing plays a big part and the larger the scope the more its effected by seeing 


  • Augustus likes this

#13 Augustus

Augustus

    Fly Me To The Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7834
  • Joined: 26 Dec 2015
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 13 July 2019 - 06:55 PM

I’ve had all the Orange Celestrons except the C14.

With regards to the orange... I think it’s just the novelty of it Lots of scopes are black, white, blue or even red but nothing besides the original Celestron SCTs and a handful of rare Vixen imports they sold are orange, let alone the same shade of orange. And there’s the thrill of many of recreating childhood/youth experiences or wishes.

The 90 is a really nice little scope. I regret selling mine. However, without a wide field of view or much real estate on the tube for a finder, it is rather hard to use for DSOs. And the Astro fork is IMO pointless as it is ridiculously overmounted and inconvenient if you tote it around on a wedge/tripod and have to power it. A C5 is equally portable in that circumstance.

The 5 is in a weird no-man’s land. It’s the rarest of the orange Celestrons, the most inconvenient to put on a non-fork mounting, and it has a large central obstruction. The overly hefty nature of the fork/tripod/power pack issue still applies. If you must have an SCT in that size range I’d really get a newer C5 or C6, not an orange C5.

The C8 is just perfect.... perfect portability and size, usable for just about anything. I have always regretted selling them and sooner or later a new one finds its way to me. I just got a new one with special coatings in mint condition.

The C11 is still pretty portable - particularly as an OTA only - though a Dob is probably better if you drive to dark skies as any mounting is going to be heavy and annoying to set up - hoisting the forks of a big SCT on to a wedge can be backbreaking, as well. Plus the view is getting a little claustrophobic and finding stuff manually can be a challenge as a result. You really need something smaller with a wider field of you have a C11.

The C14 to me only seems to make sense if you have an observatory. Too big, too long in focal length, and too long of a cool down time otherwise. Even a garage really doesn’t do it.
  • terraclarke, bremms, Bomber Bob and 2 others like this

#14 starman876

starman876

    Nihon Seiko

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 20317
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2008
  • Loc: VA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 07:18 PM

I’ve had all the Orange Celestrons except the C14.

With regards to the orange... I think it’s just the novelty of it Lots of scopes are black, white, blue or even red but nothing besides the original Celestron SCTs and a handful of rare Vixen imports they sold are orange, let alone the same shade of orange. And there’s the thrill of many of recreating childhood/youth experiences or wishes.

The 90 is a really nice little scope. I regret selling mine. However, without a wide field of view or much real estate on the tube for a finder, it is rather hard to use for DSOs. And the Astro fork is IMO pointless as it is ridiculously overmounted and inconvenient if you tote it around on a wedge/tripod and have to power it. A C5 is equally portable in that circumstance.

The 5 is in a weird no-man’s land. It’s the rarest of the orange Celestrons, the most inconvenient to put on a non-fork mounting, and it has a large central obstruction. The overly hefty nature of the fork/tripod/power pack issue still applies. If you must have an SCT in that size range I’d really get a newer C5 or C6, not an orange C5.

The C8 is just perfect.... perfect portability and size, usable for just about anything. I have always regretted selling them and sooner or later a new one finds its way to me. I just got a new one with special coatings in mint condition.

The C11 is still pretty portable - particularly as an OTA only - though a Dob is probably better if you drive to dark skies as any mounting is going to be heavy and annoying to set up - hoisting the forks of a big SCT on to a wedge can be backbreaking, as well. Plus the view is getting a little claustrophobic and finding stuff manually can be a challenge as a result. You really need something smaller with a wider field of you have a C11.

The C14 to me only seems to make sense if you have an observatory. Too big, too long in focal length, and too long of a cool down time otherwise. Even a garage really doesn’t do it.

all good points.  The C14 is a bear.  However, rings make it a lot easier to put on the mount.



#15 Defenderslideguitar

Defenderslideguitar

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Connecticut

Posted 13 July 2019 - 07:30 PM

Hey  I am new to the orange tube genre...........but a memory...I was in the library in 1982  I found a national geographic magazine dated 1980 with a pic of Saturn on the cover from Voyager. I was intrigued  by an ad for the orange C-8 in there. I had never seen  a C-8  before or an SCT stye scope for that matter.  I still have that magazine but it set me on a path to get an SCT. Ultimately in May of 1984  I bought the Meade 2080LX2.

 

Last fall   I was lucky enough to buy a deforked college astronomy class/club  owned 1979 C-8 for 150.00

.....it has these anti mirror flop posts installed, two Losmandy bars on it  a telrad and other finders  and even some notes written in pencil on the orange tube. It has great views.

 

A few months  ago a 1973 sand cast  became available locally  and I bought it. I have only tried it once and it needs collimation and I need to learn about it and spend more time with it. Admittedly the 1979   die cast is simple and great to use.

 

below are pics of the die cast student modified C-8

 

Finally   the last pic is      the C-8s squared

Attached Thumbnails

  • c-8studentIMG_2214.jpg
  • c-8studentmirroflopIMG_2216.jpg
  • c-8sturdent modifiedIMG_2213.jpg
  • c-102 and the C-8 on az8IMG_2208.jpg
  • c-8studentwriting on itIMG_2215.jpg
  • c-8's times twoIMG_2679 (1).jpg

Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 13 July 2019 - 07:32 PM.

  • terraclarke, Bonco2, Bomber Bob and 4 others like this

#16 Don W

Don W

    demi-god

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 23012
  • Joined: 19 May 2003
  • Loc: Wisconsin, USA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 08:14 PM

In 1980, I got interested in astronomy after watching Cosmos. I ordered brochures from all the companies, Orion, Meade, Celestron, Unitron etc. Had fun poring over them for months. Then I got an interesting letter from Celestron. They were going to have a sale of seconds at the Phister Hotel in downtown, Milwaukee. I got pumped! They were set up in a big conference room and had boxes and  boxes of various Celestron scopes and had a bunch of them set up, one of each except the C14. Seeing them all in their Orange glory was very exciting! Sadly, the only one I could afford was a C90 Astro (One armed job). I grabbed it and paid a discount for it. I built my own tripod and wedge and went to town.

 

Of course it didn't take long for aperture fever to take hold. Less than a year later I ordered a C8 with most of the goodies from our host, Astronomics. I learned to use the setting circles on the C90 and they were even easier on the C8 since they were larger.

 

Those two Orange tube Celestrons were very special to me and I was kind of sad to see them go to the black and now to the shiny orange of present Celestrons.


  • bbqediguana likes this

#17 rolo

rolo

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8810
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2007
  • Loc: GA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:14 PM

My before and after pics of my old 1972 C5. Gave it away to a good friend that fell in love with it....

Attached Thumbnails

  • C5-Restored.JPG

  • tim53, Scott in NC, Bonco2 and 7 others like this

#18 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 77823
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 13 July 2019 - 10:50 PM

Orange and Celestron, it's just one of those things that was written in the stars and had to be. 

 

My favorites are actually the orange tube 80mm F/11 refractors but the SCT's are the classics.  My first serious scope was a used Orange Tube C-8.  That was in the days before digital cameras so I have no photos of it.. :(

 

(not mine)

 

2f30b40b2c96f147d51a603180ccdd27.jpg

 

Jon


  • Scott in NC, Bonco2, Magnus Ahrling and 5 others like this

#19 John Higbee

John Higbee

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 657
  • Joined: 17 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 14 July 2019 - 02:23 AM

My 1976 C8 will always be the heart of my collection...43 years old and still going strong!

 

Here's a shot (scope with all the trimmings) from NEAF 2018:

celestron c8 at NEAF 2018.jpg

 

...with its big brother C14, at an earlier NEAF:

P1010050 (reduced).jpg

 

...and my favorite shot (stripped down for observing down on Virginia's Northern Neck):

C8 v1.jpg

 

John

 

 


Edited by John Higbee, 14 July 2019 - 02:31 AM.

  • Scott in NC, Adam S, rolo and 7 others like this

#20 CHASLX200

CHASLX200

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 18216
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2007
  • Loc: Tampa area Florida

Posted 14 July 2019 - 06:10 AM

I’ve had all the Orange Celestrons except the C14.

With regards to the orange... I think it’s just the novelty of it Lots of scopes are black, white, blue or even red but nothing besides the original Celestron SCTs and a handful of rare Vixen imports they sold are orange, let alone the same shade of orange. And there’s the thrill of many of recreating childhood/youth experiences or wishes.

The 90 is a really nice little scope. I regret selling mine. However, without a wide field of view or much real estate on the tube for a finder, it is rather hard to use for DSOs. And the Astro fork is IMO pointless as it is ridiculously overmounted and inconvenient if you tote it around on a wedge/tripod and have to power it. A C5 is equally portable in that circumstance.

The 5 is in a weird no-man’s land. It’s the rarest of the orange Celestrons, the most inconvenient to put on a non-fork mounting, and it has a large central obstruction. The overly hefty nature of the fork/tripod/power pack issue still applies. If you must have an SCT in that size range I’d really get a newer C5 or C6, not an orange C5.

The C8 is just perfect.... perfect portability and size, usable for just about anything. I have always regretted selling them and sooner or later a new one finds its way to me. I just got a new one with special coatings in mint condition.

The C11 is still pretty portable - particularly as an OTA only - though a Dob is probably better if you drive to dark skies as any mounting is going to be heavy and annoying to set up - hoisting the forks of a big SCT on to a wedge can be backbreaking, as well. Plus the view is getting a little claustrophobic and finding stuff manually can be a challenge as a result. You really need something smaller with a wider field of you have a C11.

The C14 to me only seems to make sense if you have an observatory. Too big, too long in focal length, and too long of a cool down time otherwise. Even a garage really doesn’t do it.

I just as well have a C14 for my AP 800 mount since setting up the 6" ED is just as much trouble. If i could buy a super good C14 from a trusted seller i would give one another shot since my first Orange C14 was a dud.

 

I may offer a trade of some type as the high power views thru a super good C14 is right up my ball field. I have no problem lifting the OTA.



#21 agmoonsolns

agmoonsolns

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1412
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018
  • Loc: Washington

Posted 14 July 2019 - 06:14 AM

Chas, what about using wheels or a dolly with your 800 mount and 6" so all you need to do is roll it outside?

 

How about a large aperture Takahashi Mewlon?



#22 shredder1656

shredder1656

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1496
  • Joined: 24 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Indiana

Posted 14 July 2019 - 06:26 AM

Orange and Celestron, it's just one of those things that was written in the stars and had to be. 

 

My favorites are actually the orange tube 80mm F/11 refractors but the SCT's are the classics.  My first serious scope was a used Orange Tube C-8.  That was in the days before digital cameras so I have no photos of it.. frown.gif

 

(not mine)

 

2f30b40b2c96f147d51a603180ccdd27.jpg

 

Jon

I REALLY like the orange refractors too.  I almost snagged one from a CN'r around a year ago.  However, I screwed up and did not stay in contact.  You snooze you lose. 


  • Jon Isaacs and Defenderslideguitar like this

#23 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 77823
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 14 July 2019 - 06:41 AM

My 1976 C8 will always be the heart of my collection...43 years old and still going strong!

 

Here's a shot (scope with all the trimmings) from NEAF 2018:

 

goodjob.gif

 

Love that matching orange dew shield.  A refractor without a dew shield looks like a bird without feathers.. A dew shield also enhances the aesthetics of an SCT.

 

Jon


  • John Higbee likes this

#24 rolo

rolo

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8810
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2007
  • Loc: GA

Posted 14 July 2019 - 06:59 AM

A couple of 1972 models. I still own the rough one cause it has the best SCT optics of over 40 C8's I've tested. My AP130GT is afraid of itlol.gif and the TeleVue 102 is terrified of itscared.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • 02-05-10 009 copy.jpg
  • image1.jpeg

Edited by rolo, 14 July 2019 - 07:00 AM.

  • bob midiri, tim53, Scott in NC and 7 others like this

#25 The Planetman

The Planetman

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 764
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2006
  • Loc: Western KY

Posted 14 July 2019 - 08:29 AM

About 20 years ago, I had a 1982 C-11 that was, without a doubt, the best SCT I've ever seen or owned.  I called it The Orange Blossom Special. 
I had it at the Twin Lakes Star Party one fall and the sky was perfect.  Saturn was steady as a rock.  Several people looked through her and remarked at how crisp and contrasty Saturn looked.  It was nearly refractor like. 

One of our club members, an ophthalmologist by profession, had his 12.5" f/5 Lightspeed set up close by.  That scope has a really nice mirror and contrast out the butt (he still owns it).  Anyway, believe it or not, The Blossom was much better on Saturn.  And a couple of well experienced observers verbally noted that.....
Now John didn't like to be out done, so what does he do?  Packs up the 12.5" Lightspeed, goes home (he lived about an hour away from our site) and brings back his 16" f/5 Lightspeed the next day- yes he had two of them at the time....
But the funny thing about it, the seeing wasn't the best on that Saturday night, so we really couldn't do a comparison like the previous night.  And there were still remarks being said about how much better Saturn looked through Blossom than the Lightspeed.
We were never able to get together to see if the 16 was better or not. 
Anyway, I had a moment of stupidity, sold it to fund a nice Meade 12.5" for my first observatory.
I now have a black tube Fastar C-14.  It's a really good one, but like I said earlier, I have never looked through any SCT that was as good as Old Blossom....and may never again....


Edited by The Planetman, 14 July 2019 - 08:31 AM.

  • Scott in NC, rolo, John Higbee and 1 other like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics