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Where Are the Comets?

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#51 Ishtim

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 04:46 PM

hello all. new to the hobby with my new evo8. Just curious, are comets also included in the main databases with these tracker scopes?

I regularly visit skyhound's page for comet "news".  There is visibility info and finder charts.

http://www.cometchas...skyhound.com/  



#52 Aquarellia

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:44 PM

I regularly visit skyhound's page for comet "news".  There is visibility info and finder charts.

http://www.cometchas...skyhound.com/  

Hi, I do the same monthly look, the correct link is http://www.cometchasing.skyhound.com

Michel


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#53 TxStars

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 12:41 AM

This is always a good place to look..

http://www.aerith.ne...t/future-n.html



#54 Aquarellia

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 12:47 AM

Another one is http://www.alpo-astr....org/cometblog/

Michel



#55 TSSClay

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 02:10 PM

All of the older comets mentioned and no love for Ikeya Zhang from March of 2002???

 

Ikeya Zhang March 2002.jpg

 

I had a lot of fun with this one and it was naked eye from Tucson and my Michigan back yard.  I do agree - we are due for a nice one any time now.

 

Clay


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#56 goodricke1

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 02:26 PM

Not many interesting local comets, but a possible interstellar one is under discussion:

 

https://groups.yahoo...ations/messages

 

Yesterday was the 2nd anniversary of 'Oumuamua's perihelion.


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#57 Jure Atanackov

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 05:02 AM

It's like we were duped into astronomy from the mid 90s to mid 2000s. Not that I'm complaining, but it is positively boring right now!

 

Comets: kicked off with Hyakutake in 1996 (tail spanning almost half the sky!), followed by Hale-Bopp in 1997 and then a flurry of bright (3rd - 5th mag comets, Ikeya-Zhang in particular) in 2001-2005. And finished with McNaught (naked eye in daylight!). Has it really been nearly 13 years since then?! Being so spoiled I remember reading John Bortle's column in old S&T's at the time and really expecting something like the Great September Comet of 1882 to come along any day now!

 

Meteors: Perseids had elevated activity throughout the 90s. Leonids, in particular 1998 (fireball shower), 1999 meteor storm, 2000 intense shower, 2001 meteor storm, 2002 meteor storm! Was lucky enough to have seen most of these, including the Leonids 2001 storm from dark desert skies high in Arizona. June Bootids 1998 produced a big outburst, as did the Draconids in 1998. Taurid resonant swarm return in 1998. There have been occasional fine showers since (Draconids 2011, 2018, Perseids 2016, Taurid resonant swarms 2005 and 2015, Orionids 2006-2010), but nowhere near the activity and excitement level from the mid 90s to early 2000s.

 

Aurora: from quiet to mid/low latitude aurora almost every 2 weeks - 7 April 2000, 15 July 2000, 31 March 2001, 13 April 2001 - and the *big* ones, 29-31 October 2003 and 20 November 2003. The October 2003 produced aurora so intense, it illuminated everything in reddish color. And that from a suburban area, at 41 °N corrected geomagnetic latitude! And the November 2003 storm produced aurora that covered 2/3 of the sky from here! Very little activity since (have seen aurora on ~10 more occasions, but nothing comparable). Looking at Cycle 25 predictions... it is not looking good.

 

I was lucky enough to have seen great comet(s), meteor storms, great aurora storm(s) and a total solar eclipse by the time I was 20! 17 years later ... it is really quiet.


Edited by Jure Atanackov, 17 September 2019 - 05:02 AM.

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#58 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 06:55 AM

It's like we were duped into astronomy from the mid 90s to mid 2000s. Not that I'm complaining, but it is positively boring right now!

 

Comets: kicked off with Hyakutake in 1996 (tail spanning almost half the sky!), followed by Hale-Bopp in 1997 and then a flurry of bright (3rd - 5th mag comets, Ikeya-Zhang in particular) in 2001-2005. And finished with McNaught (naked eye in daylight!). Has it really been nearly 13 years since then?! Being so spoiled I remember reading John Bortle's column in old S&T's at the time and really expecting something like the Great September Comet of 1882 to come along any day now!

 

Meteors: Perseids had elevated activity throughout the 90s. Leonids, in particular 1998 (fireball shower), 1999 meteor storm, 2000 intense shower, 2001 meteor storm, 2002 meteor storm! Was lucky enough to have seen most of these, including the Leonids 2001 storm from dark desert skies high in Arizona. June Bootids 1998 produced a big outburst, as did the Draconids in 1998. Taurid resonant swarm return in 1998. There have been occasional fine showers since (Draconids 2011, 2018, Perseids 2016, Taurid resonant swarms 2005 and 2015, Orionids 2006-2010), but nowhere near the activity and excitement level from the mid 90s to early 2000s.

 

Aurora: from quiet to mid/low latitude aurora almost every 2 weeks - 7 April 2000, 15 July 2000, 31 March 2001, 13 April 2001 - and the *big* ones, 29-31 October 2003 and 20 November 2003. The October 2003 produced aurora so intense, it illuminated everything in reddish color. And that from a suburban area, at 41 °N corrected geomagnetic latitude! And the November 2003 storm produced aurora that covered 2/3 of the sky from here! Very little activity since (have seen aurora on ~10 more occasions, but nothing comparable). Looking at Cycle 25 predictions... it is not looking good.

 

I was lucky enough to have seen great comet(s), meteor storms, great aurora storm(s) and a total solar eclipse by the time I was 20! 17 years later ... it is really quiet.

Unfortunately that's the way it can be in this hobby. Hang in there something will pop up. smile.gif


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#59 Tonk

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:44 AM

Even the sun has gone quiet



#60 Zorbathegeek

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 03:36 PM

Is it cloudy in the northern hemisphere? Even COBS has gone quiet. As of this posting there's only been one submission since 11th September. 


Edited by Zorbathegeek, 17 September 2019 - 03:40 PM.


#61 Tonk

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 04:25 PM

I'd better own up to why this is happening.

I installed a dual telescope rig in southern Spain back in February. Both scopes are armed with sets of custom narrow band filters tuned for various important chemical species found in comets.

Obviously the comets know this and have decided to have a laugh at my expense. Even Africano has escaped me due to the foul weather currently happening in south eastern Spain (a Gota Fria weather event - https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Cold_drop )

I'm hoping by next year they will have got bored of the joke and things will be back to normal.


Edited by Tonk, 17 September 2019 - 04:26 PM.

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#62 goodricke1

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 08:25 AM

Is it cloudy in the northern hemisphere? Even COBS has gone quiet. As of this posting there's only been one submission since 11th September. 

 

In the northern hemisphere we only get 3 clear nights each month and only when there is a full moon.....


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#63 MalVeauX

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 09:23 AM

Based on how many truly bright (great) comets we have recorded and the average, we are over-due. So long story short, in our life time maybe.

 

Very best,



#64 Diana N

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 07:22 PM

It's like we were duped into astronomy from the mid 90s to mid 2000s. Not that I'm complaining, but it is positively boring right now!

 

Comets: kicked off with Hyakutake in 1996 (tail spanning almost half the sky!), followed by Hale-Bopp in 1997 and then a flurry of bright (3rd - 5th mag comets, Ikeya-Zhang in particular) in 2001-2005. And finished with McNaught (naked eye in daylight!). Has it really been nearly 13 years since then?! Being so spoiled I remember reading John Bortle's column in old S&T's at the time and really expecting something like the Great September Comet of 1882 to come along any day now!

 

Meteors: Perseids had elevated activity throughout the 90s. Leonids, in particular 1998 (fireball shower), 1999 meteor storm, 2000 intense shower, 2001 meteor storm, 2002 meteor storm! Was lucky enough to have seen most of these, including the Leonids 2001 storm from dark desert skies high in Arizona. June Bootids 1998 produced a big outburst, as did the Draconids in 1998. Taurid resonant swarm return in 1998. There have been occasional fine showers since (Draconids 2011, 2018, Perseids 2016, Taurid resonant swarms 2005 and 2015, Orionids 2006-2010), but nowhere near the activity and excitement level from the mid 90s to early 2000s.

 

Aurora: from quiet to mid/low latitude aurora almost every 2 weeks - 7 April 2000, 15 July 2000, 31 March 2001, 13 April 2001 - and the *big* ones, 29-31 October 2003 and 20 November 2003. The October 2003 produced aurora so intense, it illuminated everything in reddish color. And that from a suburban area, at 41 °N corrected geomagnetic latitude! And the November 2003 storm produced aurora that covered 2/3 of the sky from here! Very little activity since (have seen aurora on ~10 more occasions, but nothing comparable). Looking at Cycle 25 predictions... it is not looking good.

 

I was lucky enough to have seen great comet(s), meteor storms, great aurora storm(s) and a total solar eclipse by the time I was 20! 17 years later ... it is really quiet.

Don't forget the biggest show of all in that time frame:  Shoemaker-Levy 9 hitting Jupiter.  What are the odds we'll ever see something as dramtic as that again?



#65 Tonk

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 06:22 AM

What are the odds we'll ever see something as dramtic as that again?


Not as dramatic - but it has happened again. First one noted since SL-9 was on 19th July 2009 - exactly 15 years after SL-9. See here for details - https://en.wikipedia...er_impact_event

 

... and then again in 2010 but even less dramatic - https://en.wikipedia...er_impact_event
 

There was a further recorded event in 2010 a few weeks after the first and the latest confirmed observed impact was in 2016 ... the result of more people watching Jupiter using video capture


Edited by Tonk, 29 September 2019 - 06:31 AM.



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