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Eyepiece projection with threaded eyepiece

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#1 Shane1200

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 10:53 PM

I have a Nikon 5600, a Nikon t-ring and a Celestron 1.25" Universal T-Adapter with 2x barlow.  I have  used it to take pictures on the moon but I would like take closer images of the craters. I have a zoom eyepiece with threads that I would like to attach to my camera but the eyepiece is to small for the t-ring opening and too large for the t-adapter.

 Does anyone know of a adapter that will work with treaded eyepieces?

   I  attempted using a eyepiece with the  Celestron adapter but I get a image that looks like it was shot thru keyhole. The tube narrow below the eyepieces and I can only use my shortest eyepiece. 

    Does anyone know of   T-adapter what will accept eyepieces without narrowing the tube? 



#2 oldstargazer

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 11:57 PM

https://www.bing.com...13480dc30805829

shows several types



#3 Jerry Lodriguss

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 04:05 AM

You would use the eyepiece to get more power than the Barlow?

 

Then you would be doing "eyepiece-projection" photography.

 

This adapter is what you would need.  You put the eyepiece in it, and one end goes in the focuser, and the other attaches to your camera with a T-adapter. 

 

You can adjust the distance between the eyepiece to the sensor to change the magnification.

 

But, honestly you are better off with your Barlow. Less elements, less light loss, less aberrations than a regular eyepiece, and a zoom is worse.

 

Also to get sharp high-res images of the craters, you need to use Lucky Imaging, and have the correct sampling. 

 

A simple rule of thumb to determine the focal ratio at which you should shoot is to multiply your pixel size by 5x for nights of average seeing, and 7x for nights of really good seeing.

 

For example, if you have a camera with 4.3 micron pixels, you would want to shoot at about f/22 for nights of average seeing, and at about f/30 on nights of really good seeing.

 

However, I am sad to report that you probably won't be able to do any true high-res lucky imaging with the Nikon. It would involve capturing Live View, but Live View on the Nikon D5300 is too compressed to be usable, and I assume the D5600 is the same. Maybe I'm wrong about that, I don't have a D5600 to test.

 

Jerry


Edited by Jerry Lodriguss, 22 July 2019 - 04:06 AM.


#4 Alen K

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 12:23 PM

However, I am sad to report that you probably won't be able to do any true high-res lucky imaging with the Nikon. It would involve capturing Live View, but Live View on the Nikon D5300 is too compressed to be usable, and I assume the D5600 is the same. Maybe I'm wrong about that, I don't have a D5600 to test.

He could do a series of bursts. If you do that with these particular cameras when Live View is enabled, the mirror does stay up according to evidence I have seen on YouTube. (The 3x00 and 5x00 cameras lack an official mirror lock-up mode.) Not as good as recording uncompressed video and harder of course on the shutter but some of those images will be sharp enough. After all, it's not called lucky imaging for nothing. 

 

PS. This presumes the mount and telescope connection is solid enough not to show vibration from the shutter itself. An electronic first-curtain shutter would solve that but these cameras don't have that. 


Edited by Alen K, 22 July 2019 - 02:36 PM.



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