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Which light pollution filter should I buy

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#1 hongxu chen

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 04:31 PM

Hi all,

 

I have heavy light pollution here. Does light pollution filter really help? I found there are three kinds of filters, UHS, L-PRO and CLS. Which one should I choose for astrophotography? Will it cause chromatism?

 

Thank you!


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#2 kel123

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 09:07 PM

Light pollution filters do help. I will say it depends on your setup, your budget and editing skills. No one can advise you on this without knowing your setup

#3 hongxu chen

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Posted 23 July 2019 - 01:03 AM

Light pollution filters do help. I will say it depends on your setup, your budget and editing skills. No one can advise you on this without knowing your setup

I get NP101 and KAF16200. Just start to AP. Not a lot experience. Really need your guys advice.



#4 vdog

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 12:32 AM

I get NP101 and KAF16200. Just start to AP. Not a lot experience. Really need your guys advice.

This question is probably a better one for the Equipment or Beginning and Intermediate Imaging forums.  I would suggest you request the moderator move it or start a new post in one of those forums.  You're more likely to get better help there.



#5 jgraham

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 01:22 PM

I have gotten good results with the Hutech IDAS LPS2 and the Orion Imaging Skyglow Filter.

#6 mewmartigan

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Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:21 AM

I am quite happy with my optolong L pro. Works quite well at controlling light pollution and star bloat.

#7 FlankerOneTwo

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 02:15 PM

Agree that you'll probably get better answers in the imaging forums.

There are many factors to consider including - what types of targets are you looking to image and are you using a color or monochrome sensor?

 

Your best results in truly heavy light pollution are going to be with a monochrome sensor and narrowband filters - hydrogen-alpha, oxygen III, and +/- sulfur II 5nm bandpass or less would be a good start. This, however, will limit you to emission nebulae as targets.

If you're imaging with a "color" sensor (OSC), the multi-narrowband filters such as the STC Duo, OPT Triad or Triad Ultra, or Optolong L-Enhance are your next best bet, again for emission nebulae. You can of course use standard single narrowband filters, but less efficient as most of your pixels won't be doing anything (red pixels won't see much in OIII or SII, same for blue and green in Ha).

If you're looking to image broadband targets (galaxies, reflection nebulae, etc) the L-Pro and IDAS LPS-D2 are both pretty good, the L-Pro is thought to maintain natural color balance a little better, at the expense of a little less light rejection. Neither is going to work as well narrowband, though.

 

Good luck!


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#8 hongxu chen

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 12:52 AM

Agree that you'll probably get better answers in the imaging forums.
There are many factors to consider including - what types of targets are you looking to image and are you using a color or monochrome sensor?

Your best results in truly heavy light pollution are going to be with a monochrome sensor and narrowband filters - hydrogen-alpha, oxygen III, and +/- sulfur II 5nm bandpass or less would be a good start. This, however, will limit you to emission nebulae as targets.
If you're imaging with a "color" sensor (OSC), the multi-narrowband filters such as the STC Duo, OPT Triad or Triad Ultra, or Optolong L-Enhance are your next best bet, again for emission nebulae. You can of course use standard single narrowband filters, but less efficient as most of your pixels won't be doing anything (red pixels won't see much in OIII or SII, same for blue and green in Ha).
If you're looking to image broadband targets (galaxies, reflection nebulae, etc) the L-Pro and IDAS LPS-D2 are both pretty good, the L-Pro is thought to maintain natural color balance a little better, at the expense of a little less light rejection. Neither is going to work as well narrowband, though.

Good luck!


Thank you so much for your advice. It is very helpful!

#9 HydrogenAlpha

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 04:25 AM

+1 on FlankerOneTwo. 

 

I found there are three kinds of filters, UHS, L-PRO and CLS. 

You absolutely shouldn't be using any of these. 

 

The beauty of having a mono camera is that you can use narrowband filters (SII, HA and OIII). I almost exclusively image in narrowband as I live in a bright city. For narrowband filters, I recommend a bandpass of 7nm or less. The smaller the bandpass the better, but costs go up rapidly. The baader enforced filters seem like a good balance between price and low bandpass.



#10 hongxu chen

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 01:16 AM

+1 on FlankerOneTwo. 

 

You absolutely shouldn't be using any of these. 

 

The beauty of having a mono camera is that you can use narrowband filters (SII, HA and OIII). I almost exclusively image in narrowband as I live in a bright city. For narrowband filters, I recommend a bandpass of 7nm or less. The smaller the bandpass the better, but costs go up rapidly. The baader enforced filters seem like a good balance between price and low bandpass.

How about optolong? It is cheaper than Baader. 



#11 FlankerOneTwo

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:26 AM

I've had good results with the 7nm Optolongs narrowbands (as well as their other filters), however their focus point is waaaay different than the Astrodon LRGBs that I use. Probably not a big deal if you focus manually or use fixed focus offsets, but FocusLock wasn't happy with how large the offset was from the guide star on which it was focusing through the ONAG. Might be an issue if you cycle through the filters instead of running them as a batch, and particularly if there is some slip in your focuser (as systems that attach to the fine focus pinion of a Crayford focuser may be prone to have). In that case, I found that the less driving around the focuser had to do, the better.



#12 hongxu chen

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Posted 03 August 2019 - 07:10 AM

I've had good results with the 7nm Optolongs narrowbands (as well as their other filters), however their focus point is waaaay different than the Astrodon LRGBs that I use. Probably not a big deal if you focus manually or use fixed focus offsets, but FocusLock wasn't happy with how large the offset was from the guide star on which it was focusing through the ONAG. Might be an issue if you cycle through the filters instead of running them as a batch, and particularly if there is some slip in your focuser (as systems that attach to the fine focus pinion of a Crayford focuser may be prone to have). In that case, I found that the less driving around the focuser had to do, the better.


It that AR version? Or normal one?


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