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What makes a good binoviewing eyepiece?

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#1 Jethro777

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 04:54 PM

Over time, what conclusions have you drawn about what makes a good binoviewing eyepiece?
Is whether it is a premium eyepieces one of them?

#2 Miranda2525

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 05:22 PM

Over time, what conclusions have you drawn about what makes a good binoviewing eyepiece?
Is whether it is a premium eyepieces one of them?

Binoviewing eyepieces don't have to be premium at all. The FL when using binoviewers is a lot longer and more tolerable of edge correction when using cheap eyepieces, especially if using a barlow or barlow lens element.  

 

Super cheap eyepieces shouldn't be used, (for obvious reasons), in case the on-axis views are really bad.

 

Three of my BV'ing eyepieces are Orion Expanse clones bought off Ebay. Basically, I get two for the  price of one just because it doesn't say "Orion" on the side. I have the 20mm, 15mm and 9mm pairs. They say 68° on the side, but they are really only 66° except for the 9mm which is really 70.1° as measured by one of the experts here on Cloudy Nights.

 

I also bought a pair of the 23mm Vite Aspheric pairs and they also work really well, but not quite as good as the other three pairs. Eye placement on those is a bit more tricky, but I made my own eyecups for them, making them easier to use.

 

Now to answer your question: "What makes a good binoviewing eyepiece?"

 

1. Easy eye placement: (Eyepieces that maybe difficult to use alone will be harder to use as a pair).

2. Light in weight: (eyepieces can get heavy when used in pairs).

3. Be able to produce sharp images across most of the field

4. Have a fairly wide AFOV. (At least 60°)


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#3 Jethro777

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 05:57 PM

Thank you, how do you measure the magnification you will get with binoviewing? Is it the same math as when you calculate for a standard eyepiece? What magnification does your 20/15/9 eyepieces give you?
What sort of eyeplacement is best? For example, I am guessing short eye relief eyepieces are not fun?
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#4 doug mc

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 06:50 PM

Eyepieces that don't have undercuts. Longer focal length eyepieces are much easier to merge the image than short. Best to use barlows or OCAs to gain higher magnification. Start with plossls and work your way up from there. Depends on your budget.
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#5 Kutno

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 10:27 PM

Over time, what conclusions have you drawn about what makes a good binoviewing eyepiece?
Is whether it is a premium eyepieces one of them?

 

One will generally pay more for better views; therefore, a pair of premium-priced eyepieces are preferred by this binoviewer.  While I do enjoy looking through eyepieces with narrower fields of view, I particularly enjoy viewing through eyepieces with 82° AFOVs.  Other preferences:  Eye relief:  minimum of 10mm;  Barrel diameter:  less than 2";  Weight:  no more than 9 oz. apiece.


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#6 Jeff B

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 11:00 AM

NO STINKING UNDERCUTS

 

Other than that, just about any eyepiece I find "comfortable" and easy to use in mono-vision, is/are, usually, even more comfortable in bino-vision.

 

Jeff


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#7 denis0007dl

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 11:20 AM

I personally like most all Nagler line T5 and T6, LOAs 32mm both neutral and 3D, and Zeiss Adpherics orthos 25mm FL for low power.

I dont like fat eyepieces, and very very heavy ones, and after many years of trying all existed, I am finally done - nothing else stayed to be tried.

#8 CarlDD

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 02:50 PM

Hi Jethro

 

my experience is that premium results in a more comfortable experience than entry level.

 

A mechanical design that enables the optical centerline of the eyepiece to be aligned with the physical centerline of the eyepiece, followed by, quality control during manufacturing to ensure the optical and physical centerline are exactly the same for each eyepiece of that manufacturers model and focal length. 

 

A design that that allows for comfortable nose relief, lastly and for my use, the ability to accept winged eyeguards although this is quite personal and some folk don’t like them.

 

I mainly use 4 pairs of Takahashi eyepieces, with a pair of Zeiss and a pair of 19mm TV Panoptics.

 

Best Regards

Carl



#9 Oscar56

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 06:32 PM

I personally like most all Nagler line T5 and T6, LOAs 32mm both neutral and 3D, and Zeiss Adpherics orthos 25mm FL for low power.

I dont like fat eyepieces, and very very heavy ones, and after many years of trying all existed, I am finally done - nothing else stayed to be tried.


Denis:

You prefer the LOA 32 over the LOA 21?

#10 denis0007dl

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 08:06 PM

Yes I do, but its thing of personal taste and need.

#11 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 09:55 AM

Eyepieces that Barlow well (for using in power slide BVs).
No undercuts.
Small outside barrel housing.

#12 slavicek

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 03:20 PM

For cheap binoviewer (= one with small prisms) buy cheap eyepieces, For quality binoviewer, buy wide FOV eyepieces. I use Naglers with TV and Baader binoviewers and they work perfect...



#13 Lookitup

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Posted 29 July 2019 - 12:40 AM

Currently use Pentax xf, Delite's, Vixen ssw and D14's in that order. Only D14 have smooth barrels, all are used mostly for planetary.  



#14 Miranda2525

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 02:34 PM

Thank you, how do you measure the magnification you will get with binoviewing? Is it the same math as when you calculate for a standard eyepiece? What magnification does your 20/15/9 eyepieces give you?
What sort of eyeplacement is best? For example, I am guessing short eye relief eyepieces are not fun?

I just time a star very close to zero degrees in declination and divide by four. Get a star on the right and let it drift across the field so that it goes as close as possible to crossing the center of the eyepiece until it goes all of the way to the left, and then divide by 4 to get the field in minutes of arc. 

 

My focal length is 1200mm. A good example is my 20mm eyepieces. I get 155x from them. I can't remember how long it took, as I timed it a while back. I just messed with numbers to come up with close to a 3000mm FL when using my binoviewers.

 

Another answer to your questions: 20mm's I get 155x. 15mm's I get 200x. 9mm's, I get 320x. The 20mm's give me the best eye placement and eye relief followed by the 15mm's and then the 9mm's.


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#15 Kunama

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:26 PM

I use Tak LE 5,7.5, 12.5, 18 & 30 , Pentax XF8.5 & 12 and LOA21.

 

I really only binoview Moon, Planets, Globulars and the brighter Messiers.



#16 vpraghavan

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 11:50 AM

The Hyperion Mark IV works well for me with a slight modification. I had to remove the covering around the outer part that is closest to the eye (photo shows this removed). It also does not have the undercut and has zoom in multiple steps.

V.P

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#17 Eddgie

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 02:21 PM

I dont like fat eyepieces, and very very heavy ones, and after many years of trying all existed, I am finally done - nothing else stayed to be tried.

Yeah, a BV with a pair of heavy eyepieces (Baader Zooms) is very hard on focusers, and most standard Crayford focusers will not cope well with this kind of load.  The only kind of focuser I recommend for this kind of loading is the Feathertouch with the steel rails.  A binoviewer with heavy eyepieces will go though bearings much faster than most other loads.

 

That being said, I used the Baader zooms with my binoviewers exclusively for planets and really loved them. 

 

No days, I am using a cheap Burgess binoviewer with a pair of Nikon zooms for my Lunt, but my Lunt 80 has the Feathertouch, so I would feel OK using the Baaders in it.   I don't need them, but I would not hesitate to use them.  (The Nikon 7-21s were bought off of Ebay for something like $20 each!  Some shop in Canada was liquidating stock.. Several people bought one.. I bought two.. LOL).

 

The BV as pictured weighs 240g less than the 31 Nagler behind it!

 

thumbnail_20190730_101025.jpg



#18 Jeff B

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 03:26 PM

Lately, I've been really enjoying the APM 10, 15, and 18mm Ultra Flats.  Nice and comfortable with good eye relief, barlow very well and a nice 65 degree AFOV, which is sharp to the edge with my slower refractors (F7 and slower), especially with my Denk power switch in place.  Very good solar system eyepieces too as well as very "reasonable" prices for a pair of this quality (both mechanical and optical).

 

The 24mm version is rather big and heavy but has found a home with out 8" F13 and 11" F12 achromats, serving up some spectacular viewing with those long, slow lenses.  In particular M11 via the 11" F12 from our dark site was stunning with the 24mm's as was M13 and other globs, like M5.

 

Jeff



#19 25585

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 09:15 AM

Over time, what conclusions have you drawn about what makes a good binoviewing eyepiece?
Is whether it is a premium eyepieces one of them?

Long eye relief and easy exit pupil access - even more important than for mono use.

Light weight and thin enough for some i.p.d. variance

 

On binoculars, I prefer smaller diameter eye lenses than for mono viewing. 



#20 sonny.barile

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Posted 03 August 2019 - 07:52 AM

I’m old fashioned and like less glass. RKE and erfle types. Convienently light, small, inexpensive, middle sized fields. Perfect for a long focal length scope in an urban light polluted environment. 


Edited by sonny.barile, 03 August 2019 - 07:55 AM.


#21 Ed D

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 07:43 AM

No safety grooves or undercuts.  I like using good quality Plossls, not necessarily super expensive, but not cheap.  I find longer focal length eyepieces are easier to merge, so I usually use 17mm and longer along with a 2x or 3x Barlow.  YMMV

 

Ed D




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