Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Too Much Scope !

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 26 July 2019 - 09:08 PM

Soon after  my heart transplant I purchased a brand new 5" Tal refractor. Tonight was the first night and setup and take down exhausted my energy- the views were superb on Jupiter.  However, there's no way I am going to set up and hope the seeing is good then take down and march back in the house. 

 

I am about to go back out,  Quantum or Questar-setup takes a few minutes!   

 

Matt

 

 


  • ehallspqr, terraclarke and rcwolpert like this

#2 Stellar1

Stellar1

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 306
  • Joined: 08 Dec 2018
  • Loc: Ontario, Canada

Posted 26 July 2019 - 11:17 PM

You my friend are a dedicated astronomer, I hope your transplant keeps you healthy for years to come but, don't bite off more than you can chew, if your scope is proving too much then a hard decision may be in order, well being trumps aperture.


  • terraclarke, rcwolpert and Pragmatist like this

#3 JamesMStephens

JamesMStephens

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 663
  • Joined: 25 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Posted 26 July 2019 - 11:53 PM

The Questar might be the thing for you!


  • Matt Looby likes this

#4 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 27 July 2019 - 01:19 AM

The Questar might be the thing for you!

It already is- I just came back in with the Q.


  • JamesMStephens likes this

#5 JimP

JimP

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2368
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2003
  • Loc: USA

Posted 27 July 2019 - 07:21 AM

 As we all have heard many times and, which is so very true, your Best telescope is the one you use the most. The fact that you derive such pleasure from observing with your Questar 3.5 and Quantum 4 is what it’s all about. In September I will have been observing for 54 years. During this time I always owned a telescope, used it and, most of the time, kept journals of my observations. There is no doubt that for many of the things I wanted to do significant aperture was necessary but after all these years of observing I realize the most important thing, for me, is having fun and enjoying being outside observing the heavens with my own telescope. 

 

Matt, you are an inspiration to us all. I greatly enjoy reading about your experiences and observations and love your lunar drawings. Being able to walk outside and set up so easily and observe with such an exquisite telescope is what the Questar is all about.

 

Jim


Edited by JimP, 27 July 2019 - 07:22 AM.

  • Matt Looby, terraclarke and Pragmatist like this

#6 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 27 July 2019 - 10:30 AM

Thank you for those wise and  kind words.  I wish you well and wait for more observing reports.  'brought out the Q4  with 2 eyepieces- one in the eyepiece barrel the other in my hand, cradling the Q with one arm and a walk of a few paces to the table, rough polar align and plug in the drive. The Q4 held its own against the 5" refractor in general features on Jup.

 

V/R,

 

Matt



#7 justfred

justfred

    Viking 1

  • ****-
  • Posts: 530
  • Joined: 24 Sep 2010
  • Loc: Birmingham, Alabama, USA

Posted 27 July 2019 - 11:19 AM

Outstanding, Matt!

 

Glad you're on the mend.

 

The Questar performs beyond its modest aperture.

 

And its fun!

 

Praying for your continued speedy recovery,

 

Fred


Edited by justfred, 27 July 2019 - 05:02 PM.

  • Matt Looby likes this

#8 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 27 July 2019 - 04:58 PM

Thank you Fred!



#9 ehallspqr

ehallspqr

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Port Townsend, WA. USA

Posted 27 July 2019 - 09:58 PM

Glad to hear your on the mend. Amazing that this type of surgery is so routine nowadays. Take it easy and enjoy the little things I always say.

 

I think Questar owners have figured out the “riddle of telescopes”. Aperture is nice but it’s not everything. The little Questar is so convenient, simple, portable, beautiful aesthetics, a true classic in the world of personal astronomy. I have set up big refractors on massive equatorial mounts and it is definitely a enthusiasm & energy zapping undertaking compared to a Questar or other type of quick look scope. I love looking through a big refractor as long as someone else has set it up for me lol. Never have been able to have a look through a Quantum 4” and compare it to a good refractor. I always imagined it was very similar to the little Questar with just a bit more performance. I’m really curious to see how the new Q5 will stack up against a premium 4-5” refractor.


  • Matt Looby and Pragmatist like this

#10 Optics Patent

Optics Patent

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 30 Oct 2016
  • Loc: Dallas TX

Posted 27 July 2019 - 11:57 PM

I suspect the Q5 might be a hair behind a fine 5” refractor in performance when fully stable but will be miles ahead in convenience and like regain (or exceed) any advantage in less stable real world circumstances such as a breeze.

Compared to the 3.5Q the Q5 will have a clear optical advantage and will be “portable enough”, compared to “amazingly portable”.
  • Matt Looby, Kevin Barker, ehallspqr and 2 others like this

#11 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 28 July 2019 - 12:59 AM

I suspect the Q5 might be a hair behind a fine 5” refractor in performance when fully stable but will be miles ahead in convenience and like regain (or exceed) any advantage in less stable real world circumstances such as a breeze.

Compared to the 3.5Q the Q5 will have a clear optical advantage and will be “portable enough”, compared to “amazingly portable”.

Observed through a five inch russian mak in south Florida under excellent (sub arc second seeing).  There is no difference between the mak the 5 inch refractor- truly astonishing.  The detail captured  is burnt into my memory.  I only wish I brought my Questar.  Luckily my observing mentor (the guy I earned everything from) had a Quantum- again no difference between that and a four inch refractor.  It's all about the seeing.  By the way I was lucky enough to buy the Quantum from him.  So the 5" is definitely on my list I just need 10K.


  • ehallspqr, justfred, terraclarke and 1 other like this

#12 Kevin Barker

Kevin Barker

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 795
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2009
  • Loc: Auckland, NZ

Posted 28 July 2019 - 02:44 PM

Spot on.

Like you Ben I'd be surprised if the Q5 would outperform 

IMG_1082.jpg

a top notch apo. It should however be a lot easier to set up.

I suspect the Q5 might be a hair behind a fine 5” refractor in performance when fully stable but will be miles ahead in convenience and like regain (or exceed) any advantage in less stable real world circumstances such as a breeze.

Compared to the 3.5Q the Q5 will have a clear optical advantage and will be “portable enough”, compared to “amazingly portable”.


  • Matt Looby, Mike McShan and terraclarke like this

#13 ehallspqr

ehallspqr

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 445
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Port Townsend, WA. USA

Posted 28 July 2019 - 03:59 PM

I’ve side by side directly compared a newish Q7 with BB to top flight Apo’s like AstroPhysics, Takahashi, Zeiss. High altitude, dark location with nearly perfect seeing on multiple occasions. The Q7 compares most closely to a 5” but with a brighter more vibrant image. Contrast, sharpness was very close and most experienced observers in our group preferred the Q7 to a premium 5”. However when compared to 6-7” Apo refractor them I noticed most people leaning towards the refractor. It’s close though people and only really noticeable when moving back and forth between eye pieces. It’s hard to beat a premium Apo refractor on planetary, inch for inch. Of course my friends big refractor completely fills the back of a full size SUV with the both rows of seats folded down and is a two man 15-20 minute job to get setup. My Meade 5” ETX Mak is up and running in just a few minutes. I suspect the Q5 will be very similar to the ETX 125 in terms of setup and performance. Me thinks people are really going to like the new 5” Questar. Refractor like views in a much more convenient package. It should even be a bit less in price to a properly set up 5” AP, Zeiss or Tak Apo which are insanely expensive.



#14 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 28 July 2019 - 05:47 PM

We all have our experiences- my comparisons were done under optically measured sub arc second seeing on two different occasion overseen

by an expert..  There was no difference detected visually between the  Maks and the Nikon 4" f/12 APO, and the high end 5" f/12 APOMAX. The chances of observing in sub arc second seeing is about a once in a lifetime achievement.  I stand strongly by my statements.  


Edited by Matt Looby, 29 July 2019 - 07:02 AM.

  • justfred and RMay like this

#15 terraclarke

terraclarke

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 20382
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Terra Nova Observatory

Posted 07 August 2019 - 08:39 AM

Take care Matt! Try to not overdo it. Soak up starlight with your Q and Q. It has wonderful curative properties.


  • rcwolpert likes this

#16 Matt Looby

Matt Looby

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Lake Champlain Valley

Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:49 AM

Thank you Terra!


  • terraclarke likes this

#17 BillHarris

BillHarris

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 442
  • Joined: 29 Nov 2017
  • Loc: northwest Alabama

Posted 11 August 2019 - 10:15 PM

I've been observing for over 50 years and the thing I like most about my Q3.5 is the ease of setup. As we speak, the mount is outside and I'll take the tube assy out around midnight, set it up and wait for the Moon (and Jupiter and Saturn) to clear the southern trees.

Painless.
  • Matt Looby, terraclarke and Loren Gibson like this

#18 JamesMStephens

JamesMStephens

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 663
  • Joined: 25 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Posted 11 August 2019 - 10:20 PM

I've been observing for over 50 years and the thing I like most about my Q3.5 is the ease of setup. As we speak, the mount is outside and I'll take the tube assy out around midnight, set it up and wait for the Moon (and Jupiter and Saturn) to clear the southern trees.

Painless.

It must be clear in northwest Alabama!  

 

It sounds like you have a Duplex.  Do you use a tripod, table Tristand?

 

Jim


Edited by JamesMStephens, 11 August 2019 - 10:22 PM.

  • Matt Looby likes this

#19 BillHarris

BillHarris

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 442
  • Joined: 29 Nov 2017
  • Loc: northwest Alabama

Posted 12 August 2019 - 08:16 AM

It was clear! The Moon got into the gap in the trees but I had only a little over an hour to observe before it got into another tree. Still, it was worth it-- the Aristarchus plateau was under a low Sun and showed a lot of detail. Gassendi was also under low light and looked good.

Although the seeing was poor, I got to evaluate a new 8mm eyepiece. It'll be nice as a high power (150-300x) eyepiece with better seeing.
  • Matt Looby, terraclarke and Loren Gibson like this

#20 BillHarris

BillHarris

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 442
  • Joined: 29 Nov 2017
  • Loc: northwest Alabama

Posted 12 August 2019 - 08:18 AM

Standard Questar, I set it up on a Meade tripod.
  • Matt Looby likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics