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An uncommon approach

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#1 rugby

rugby

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 08:25 PM

A brief search for threads relating to the Webb book Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes turned up nothing. That seems unusual for  a site dedicated to viewing double stars . I tend to use this reference  as I plot pairs on the AAVSO  sheets and although I know it's innacurate I cant help but be charmed by the descriptions.  

An example I would like to draw attention to is 13 aquiliae ( Epsilon).This star is not a double but that which lies close following is curious. Seems a faint triple can be found which under my light polluted skies in a 120 refractor can be seen as a very faint and thin nebulous blur. I needed averted vision to confirm its existence.

An eight inch at 250x shows it much better. Now it shows as three minute stars the middle of which is brightest and not entirely all in a straight row.

i consulted Stella Doppie. Bringing up Struve 2428 which lies in the same low power field there is a reference to WRD 2 AB 13 Aquilae. The position angles and brightness for the three stars match what I saw.

I am not interested in measuring anything. Just to revisit something seen so long ago is haunting


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#2 flt158

flt158

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:08 PM

Hi Rugby.

 

Got both last night (Thursday 1st August). 

Stf 2428 A and B stars were an easy split at 40X and 112X using my William Optics 158 mm apochromatic refractor with a completely new Crayford focuser. 

I saw it as a triple star at 112X up to 280X. 

What impressed me most was the C star. It is red orange -similar to a carbon star. 

It is only 11.1 in magnitude. Guide 9.1 DVD pointed out the colour to me. 

I am thrilled to have seen all 3 components. 

 

Epsilon Aquilae was a easy triple at 112X in the same FOV magnitude 4.  

The A star was visible to my eyes without and optical aid.

 

I very much thank you for drawing our attention to this triple - triple in Aquila, Rugby! 

I must have another look very soon.

 

There is also a carbon star nearby which I must check out. 

 

Clear skies, 

 

Aubrey. 




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