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August 2019 Supernova Thread

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#1 Redbetter

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 12:06 AM

It is late in this lunar cycle, but there is one promising target that showed up recently on the Bright Supernova page that was not already covered in the prior months' threads.  So I guess it is time to kick off the August thread.  I have not a had a chance to observe this one yet, hopefully I will get one more clear night this cycle:

 

SN 2019krv is associated with NGC 7236 in Pegasus.  It is a type Ia and was measured at 16.4 mag on 7/25.  It is fairly wide away from the galaxy, a somewhat unusual looking E-S0 type that shows disruption stretching out toward the location of the current SN.  It is interacting with its very close neighbor NGC 7237 which has another smaller galaxy adjacent to it labeled 7237c that appears to be about 10% nearer to us than the interacting pair.  The pair of NGC's are listed as Arp 129, K564, and II Zw 172. 

 

There are a number of other much fainter galaxies distributed around the area.  Those are on my target list if conditions are favorable.   


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#2 Redbetter

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 12:20 AM

I tried this one last night with the 20", but was effectively clouded out again.  I still made an attempt through the thin but continuous high level cloud, despite losing a full magnitude naked eye.  The clouds were being illuminated to about 0.3 magnitude brighter than the sky is on even a mediocre night.   Still, peering through the haze I was able to see the three galaxies and spent some time trying to see the SN but did not have any convincing sighting.  I did spot one of the 16g mag galaxies preceding it to the NW but it was just the faintest averted vision splotch.  I searched for a few of the other faint galaxies nearby and with considerable difficulty located four more down to 16g mag.  Wasn't seeing any of them well enough to make a decent description other than detecting them, so I packed up and came home.


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#3 George N

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 10:48 PM

Thanks! I'll give SN2019krv a shot if I get a chance!



#4 Redbetter

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 05:23 AM

Thanks! I'll give SN2019krv a shot if I get a chance!

I wish you luck.  If it peaked on 7/25 at 16.4 mag as a Type Ia it is likely about 17.8 mag now and declining about 0.05 mag/day at this stage.  I don't have steady enough skies for it, although they can be dark enough to put it in play if they were only steady.

 

I am having trouble finding new candidates brighter than 17 at this time. 



#5 George N

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:42 PM

I wish you luck.  If it peaked on 7/25 at 16.4 mag as a Type Ia it is likely about 17.8 mag now and declining about 0.05 mag/day at this stage.  I don't have steady enough skies for it, although they can be dark enough to put it in play if they were only steady.

 

I am having trouble finding new candidates brighter than 17 at this time. 

OK.... here's what I got Friday Night: https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/

 

and: https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/

 

Kopernik Observatory & Science Center (http://www.kopernik.org) Image taken at 3:40 UT Aug 24 2019 total exposure time = 10 minutes - seeing = poor - using an Optical Guidance Systems 20-inch F/8 and FLI ProLine CCD

 

Measured magnitude of SN2019krv in the Kopernik Image = 18.62


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#6 Redbetter

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Posted 02 September 2019 - 03:26 PM

The only other one I managed to detect for the month was 2019osl in UGC 3115 in Taurus.  The SN was discovered on 8/26 and tentatively classified as "a young Type II" on 8/27.  As such it shouldn't fade that rapidly from the reported 16.8 mag. 

 

I targeted this one as a long shot on 8/30/19, and initially did not see it with the 20".  I had hand plotted the galaxy as it was not in Uranometria.   I logged the galaxy as very small, very faint, fair surface brightness with some brightening to the semi-stellar core.  Galaxy is elongated between 2 or 3:1 in the NNE/SSW orientation.  For the SN I only had position relative to the center to work from as I have not found any images of it so far. After some time of studying the field I concluded that an extremely faint spot I detected at moments was at the proper point to be the SN, slightly preceding and south of the core to the SSE.  This was a marginal detection at 278x in poor seeing, but good transparency in 21.65 MPSAS skies.  I was having trouble detecting stars reliably to 17 mag at the time (seeing...) 

 

Just prior to this one I targeted 2019hvv in MCG-2-3-9 in Cetus, but this Type Ia was about 3 weeks past its 8/10 peak at 17.0, which probably left it in the ~18 mag range at the time of my attempted observation.  In very stable skies I might have had a chance, but in seeing that elicited four letter words in my notes I had no hint of it.  Winds at that site pick up noticeably in the later AM hours and really make a mess of seeing and telescopic limiting magnitude.


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