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Impact on Jupiter on 2019-08-07 at 4:07 UTC?

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#76 troyt

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 10:58 PM

Looks like you have capture an impact event to me - well done waytogo.gif

 

Marc - does DeTeCt work on colour files? In the past it was only mono data.

 

 

I think that the difficulty in getting confirmation here shows the need for a coordinated Jovian Impact Monitoring Program, much like NASA has with it's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program.  I would be very interested in trying both if I could, and it would be good if there was a better way to coordinate observations between both amateur and professional astronomers and more quickly confirm reports of impacts.

From memory Anthony Wesley tried to get a amateur program running years ago without luck. I think the proposal was to get several sites in different countries to monitor Jupiter for potential impacts. This was after he detected an impact flash himself.  


Edited by troyt, 08 August 2019 - 10:59 PM.

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#77 DMach

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:03 PM

Darryl posted a WJ image in an earlier post. 

Yup, but according to the S&T article:

 

"Due to prevailing winds, any possible dark scar left in the wake of the impact will be slowly drifting westward, increasing in longitude by approximately 3.9°"

 

It then goes on to estimate coordinates over the next few days.

 

So I'm wondering if there's a way to locate a specific ROI (e.g. using WinJUPOS) on an image based on the coordinates?



#78 DMach

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:11 PM

Here's what I was able to manage given the limitations above:

 

attachicon.gif Jupiter 2019-08-08 11-41UT v1 36pc.png

 

Nothing's jumping out at me ... but then I'm not sure exactly where to look. Is there a method for highlighting a ROI in WJ?

Here's another set of images taken around 20 minutes later. I had taken the time to equilibrate and collimate my 'scope by then, but seeing was still pretty poor.

 

My 5 YO son was helping me with the acquisition, as this was a rare case where it was not yet past his bed time ... a very enjoyable shared experience! He also helped with the processing, and in particular did the measurements in WinJUPOS and decided on the final processing in PS (colour, gamma, histogram adjustments) ... I think he did a pretty good job! (But then I would, wouldn't I lol.)

 

Jupiter 2019-08-08 12-08UT v1 33pc.png


Edited by DMach, 08 August 2019 - 11:15 PM.

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#79 DMach

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:41 PM

Just saw an image Fabio posted on Astrobin, very good resolution:

 

https://www.astrobin.com/419920/



#80 KiwiRay

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:49 PM

Working backwards from the S&T times, it would have crossed the CM at 11:25 UT on August 8, just 16 minutes before Darren's first image (11:41 UT).  This would place the impact a little right of center in that image.


Edited by KiwiRay, 08 August 2019 - 11:53 PM.


#81 Joe1950

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:53 PM

Joe:  But did that take into account the expected 3.9° westward movement per Earth day?

The image with the dark spot was taken less than 1 Jovian day after the impact. The GRS rotated from its position in frame 2 to frame 3. Roughly 9 hours later.

 

 

>> I removed my animations of the impact and possible dark spot resulting from it. I feel any confirmation should come from professional sources and I am not sufficiently equipped or knowledgable to contribute in a scientific manner.


Edited by Joe1950, 09 August 2019 - 01:21 AM.


#82 WarmWeatherGuy

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 01:02 AM

CNET reported it.

 

https://www.cnet.com...-it-from-earth/


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#83 CPellier

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 02:21 AM

What about the gray smears just left of centre?:

attachicon.gif post-285172-0-53238300-1565311386ed.png

 

The clouds here are moving west relative to the GRS, so perhaps any impact would be smeared to the west like this?

This is usual SEBs jetstream eddy activity. So definitely no scar, this time again.


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#84 BQ Octantis

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 02:39 AM

As promised:

 

Jupiter Animation 2019-08-08

 

BQ


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#85 Kokatha man

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 03:41 AM

Here's what I was able to manage given the limitations above:

Nothing's jumping out at me ... but then I'm not sure exactly where to look. Is there a method for highlighting a ROI in WJ?

 

 

Darryl posted a WJ image in an earlier post. 

 

 

Yup, but according to the S&T article:

 

"Due to prevailing winds, any possible dark scar left in the wake of the impact will be slowly drifting westward, increasing in longitude by approximately 3.9°"

 

It then goes on to estimate coordinates over the next few days.

 

So I'm wondering if there's a way to locate a specific ROI (e.g. using WinJUPOS) on an image based on the coordinates?

Holy Kryptonite..! lol.gif

 

I did point out in Posts #40 & #46 that in the turbulent latitudes of the SEB any impact "footprint" might be very short-lived: also, in the screenshot of my quick WinJUPOS measurement of Ethan's image, that along with the position measurement, the westerly drift in the relevant zone would need to be factored into any projected possible "scar" remnants! wink.gif

 

The drift rate as well as the position mesurements were all in that screenshot I posted - pass marks to Andrew only..! lol.gif

 

We all probably need to take a few deep breaths on this whee.gif slaphappy.gif whistling.gif ...so far nothing seems to have turned up & as time goes by the liklihood becomes increasingly less so - we're at Leigh Creek & we hope to image the relevant aspects of Jove if we get any chance, but I'm not terribly optimistic...but none of this takes way from Ethan's discovery! waytogo.gif​ 


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#86 Ethan Chappel

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 09:27 AM

Post-flash photos, while I was still oblivious to what happened minutes earlier.

 

2019-08-07-0420_2-EC-RGB.png

2019-08-07-0428_1-EC-IR.png

2019-08-07-0435_2-EC-CH4.png


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#87 aeroman4907

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 10:08 AM

Ethan, great job again.  I am not sure your imaging run alone will yield any real confirming results.  As a gross over-simplification, I used the speed of sound on Jupiter to estimate the size of the blast wave on Jupiter.  Using a high end of 1220m/s (source here: http://www.lpl.arizo.../soundspeed.pdf), at 20 minutes past the event, that would be 2928 km if my quick math is correct.  That is around 1/50 the diameter of Jupiter, so about 8 pixels on your supplied images.  The RGB image you show at 12.6 minutes would only be about 5 pixels and I don't think the resolution of that particular area holds up enough to make any detection possible.  Of course the actual speed of the blast wave would be different because I believe energy of the impact makes a difference, and the distance of the observable impact area will be lessened due to the dissipation of the energy into Jupiter's dense atmosphere, but it has been too many years since I took aerodynamics...


Edited by aeroman4907, 09 August 2019 - 10:16 AM.

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#88 JupiterOwl

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 12:49 PM

Ethan, great job again.  I am not sure your imaging run alone will yield any real confirming results.  As a gross over-simplification, I used the speed of sound on Jupiter to estimate the size of the blast wave on Jupiter.  Using a high end of 1220m/s (source here: http://www.lpl.arizo.../soundspeed.pdf), at 20 minutes past the event, that would be 2928 km if my quick math is correct.  That is around 1/50 the diameter of Jupiter, so about 8 pixels on your supplied images.  The RGB image you show at 12.6 minutes would only be about 5 pixels and I don't think the resolution of that particular area holds up enough to make any detection possible.  Of course the actual speed of the blast wave would be different because I believe energy of the impact makes a difference, and the distance of the observable impact area will be lessened due to the dissipation of the energy into Jupiter's dense atmosphere, but it has been too many years since I took aerodynamics...

In layman's terms: The big fatty just absorbed it like nothing happened wink.gif


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#89 Lunatiki

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 01:20 PM

Here is a gif made by 3 of my images and 10 others that show how the 2009 impact dispersed over, I think, a 2 week period. You are looking down on the S. Pole.

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#90 39.1N84.5W

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 05:17 PM

Congratulations!
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#91 Mirzam

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 06:22 PM

Just a comment.  While we know that some impacts have produced transient dark “scar” features on Jupiter, we do not know that all impacts will produce such scars.  Indeed, our knowledge of potential impacting bodies, ranging from massive iron to ice + dirt in composition, suggests a rather broad range in impact effects.  I agree with the poster above who suggested an atmospheric impact, which may not have produced a dark scar.  Nevertheless, the OP’s data are important for perhaps documenting a class of Jovian impacts that has not previously been observed.

 

JimC


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#92 Marc Delcroix

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 05:53 AM

Looks like you have capture an impact event to me - well done waytogo.gif

 

Marc - does DeTeCt work on colour files? In the past it was only mono data.

 

 

From memory Anthony Wesley tried to get a amateur program running years ago without luck. I think the proposal was to get several sites in different countries to monitor Jupiter for potential impacts. This was after he detected an impact flash himself.  

Well, DeTeCt by itself is a project (see http://www.astrosurf...ject_detect.php ) to gather amateurs observations in order to estimate the frequency of impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. I launched it in 2012, in close coordination with pros (Ricardo Hueso et al. from UPV-EHU, Spain).
If you look carefully, you have there a few professional monitoring programs (Pic du Midi, Hampton University, and we will get soon in a program from Senegal), aside amateurs, some of which are really observing with the aim or participating to the program).
 

And yes DeTeCt v3.x handles color files (even if greying them during processing).


Edited by Marc Delcroix, 10 August 2019 - 06:03 AM.

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#93 Marc Delcroix

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 05:59 AM

Post-flash photos, while I was still oblivious to what happened minutes earlier.

 

attachicon.gif 2019-08-07-0420_2-EC-RGB.png

attachicon.gif 2019-08-07-0428_1-EC-IR.png

attachicon.gif 2019-08-07-0435_2-EC-CH4.png

Again another excellent work Ethan, I do not see any black scar in visible wavelengths/infrared typical of the 1994 / 2009 remnants, nor white scar in the CH4 889nm absorption band. Anyway this goes with what we expected comparing your discovery to the 5 other flashes including one much brighter in 2012 which did not leave any scar.


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#94 Lunatiki

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 07:44 AM

Scar or no scar, it was an important event to capture and you can impress your friends by doing a google search on your name and Jupiter flash. Once in a lifetime too, unless you are Anthony Wesley. Does Bird still come around here? Used to all the time, many moons ago.


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#95 Tulloch

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 08:28 AM

And anyway, flash or no flash, they are great images, well processed and sharp.

 

Worthy of worldwide attention smile.gif


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#96 Tulloch

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 09:04 PM

A little late, but news has finally hit Australia too!

 

https://www.news.com...8b2547cee0bd167


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#97 Ethan Chappel

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 12:41 AM

A little late, but news has finally hit Australia too!

I thought you all live in the future. How did this take so long? thinking1.gif lol.gif

 

 

BTW, one L too many in my last name ohlord.gif, unless future me added it.


Edited by AstroEthan, 13 August 2019 - 12:46 AM.

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#98 Riccardo_italy

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 04:36 AM

Italian news

 

https://video.lastam...a/102365/102376

 

Congrats Ethan!



#99 AstroDan2015

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 08:17 PM

Hi Ethan,

 

I just found out about this a few minutes ago while surfing YouTube. Congratulations on your Jupiter Fireball discovery! waytogo.gif

 

I know exactly how you feel, the same thing happened to me 7 years ago when I observed through the eyepiece of my backyard telescope a very similar Jupiter impact. Here is an image of that September 10, 2012 fireball captured by George Hall of Dallas TX.

 

How many seconds in duration was the flash? Ours was a max of 2 seconds.

 

Best Wishes, Dan cool.gif

JupiterGeorgeHall9102012.jpg


Edited by AstroDan2015, 15 August 2019 - 08:25 PM.

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#100 Ethan Chappel

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 11:02 PM

Thanks Dan! The length I've heard back is 1.55 seconds. When I watch the recording at original speed, the flash seems to faintly linger for a few seconds longer, but for all I know it could be a persistence of vision issue. I've shared the entire recording with Marc so he and others can take deep dives into the data.


Edited by AstroEthan, 15 August 2019 - 11:05 PM.



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