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Carbon Star Newbie

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#1 aeromarmot

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 09:22 PM

Have been a visual Deep Sky observer for decades. At the 2019 Golden State Star Party, another astronomer introduced me to carbon stars, specifically s Cephei. I think I found a new avenue to pursue! Question, what are your favorite carbon stars? And what are some of the showcase stars to observe? I will be using either an 8in f/6 Meade EQ Newtonian or a 102mm Celestron f/9 EQ Refractor.
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#2 siriusandthepup

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 09:26 PM

Best one ever is the one in the gap between the clusters in the Double Cluster. Super obvious.


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#3 aeromarmot

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 09:30 PM

Best one ever is the one in the gap between the clusters in the Double Cluster. Super obvious.

Huh.  I have enjoyed viewing the Double Cluster since the early 80s (one of my favorites).  Did not know there is a carbon star there!  Thank you!



#4 siriusandthepup

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 09:59 PM

The great Double Cluster in Perseus

 

I always see the one between main clusters, but this photo seems to indicate that it is not alone. I will have to see how visible those others are - never noticed them before.

hmmm...


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#5 siriusandthepup

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:08 PM

Here is one I didn't know about - another easy one to find. I've never noticed a red star in the with the blue ones. We can both look. smile.gif

 

NASA's Hubble Spots Carbon Buckyballs

 

<edit> Jewel Box cluster is too low for us to observe - constellation Crux. Barely hits the horizon at all here in Texas.


Edited by siriusandthepup, 07 August 2019 - 10:18 PM.

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#6 Astro-Master

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:15 PM

T Lyrae is a very red carbon star.

 

V Aquila is good.

 

LW Cygni

 

V Corona Borealis

 

And Herschel's Garnet star Mu Cephi  are all visible in the summer sky, have a look.


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#7 The Ardent

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:25 PM

https://www.astrolea...-observing-club
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#8 Jim Waters

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:41 PM

T Lyrae is a very red carbon star.

 

V Aquila is good.

 

LW Cygni

 

V Corona Borealis

 

And Herschel's Garnet star Mu Cephi  are all visible in the summer sky, have a look.

+1 for T Lyra.  Very nice carbon star.


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#9 theApex

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:51 PM

R Leporis has definitely got to be in any Carbon star list worth its salt.

According to its color index of 5.70, it should be the reddest of them all! But if there's one thing I came to learn from observing these crimson gems, is that seeing and magnification certainly affect how we perceive their "redness" - not to mention their inherent variability.

Southerly DY Crucis as well. Though you lot up north cannot see it, it's a great, contrasty companion (color index 5.56) to bright blue-white Beta Crucis.

Last but not least, V Hya is another fine example as well, among others.

S&T magazine's Sue French has recently come up with a fine list to get started on. ("Rubies and Sapphires" S&T 05/19)


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Edited by theApex, 07 August 2019 - 11:05 PM.

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#10 theApex

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:55 PM

https://www.astrolea...-observing-club

Which, BTW, is in the appropriate folder on SkySafari's observing list database, ready to be downloaded.

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#11 fcathell

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 10:57 PM

T Lyrae and R Leporis are the best.  Look like red LEDs!

 

FC


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#12 theApex

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 11:01 PM

Here is one I didn't know about - another easy one to find. I've never noticed a red star in the with the blue ones. We can both look. smile.gif

NASA's Hubble Spots Carbon Buckyballs

<edit> Jewel Box cluster is too low for us to observe - constellation Crux. Barely hits the horizon at all here in Texas.

This one (DU Cru) is more orangey than red.

Nearby DY Cru is the one to look for!

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#13 theApex

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 11:14 PM

The aforementioned Sue French article - including the link for two S&T Carbon Star observing guides:

https://www.skyandte...wels-of-spring/

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#14 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 11:16 PM

+1 T Lyrae. Would love to see R Leporis but it's too low in the trees when visible for me.
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#15 aeromarmot

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 11:32 PM

Thank you!  Purchased their Carbon Star Book!



#16 aeromarmot

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 11:34 PM

R Leporis has definitely got to be in any Carbon star list worth its salt.

According to its color index of 5.70, it should be the reddest of them all! But if there's one thing I came to learn from observing these crimson gems, is that seeing and magnification certainly affect how we perceive their "redness" - not to mention their inherent variability.

Southerly DY Crucis as well. Though you lot up north cannot see it, it's a great, contrasty companion (color index 5.56) to bright blue-white Beta Crucis.

Last but not least, V Hya is another fine example as well, among others.

S&T magazine's Sue French has recently come up with a fine list to get started on. ("Rubies and Sapphires" S&T 05/19)


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I'll have to try my f/6 reflector and f/9 refractor to see which works better!


Edited by aeromarmot, 08 August 2019 - 01:13 AM.

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#17 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 11:40 PM

The reflector should have truer overall color than the refractor. I use an 8" f6 dob and as said above, T Lyrae looks like a red led light.
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#18 cliff mygatt

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 10:16 AM

You might try out the Astronomical League's Carbon star observing program here.  Good luck!


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#19 IMB

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 12:04 PM

When I was star hopping to NGC 6751 in Aql, I noticed a very red star in the field of view, which seemed to be a carbon star. And indeed, it was - V Aql.


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#20 flt158

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:14 PM

Hello Aeromarmot. 

 

The constellation Andromeda will be making its autumn appearance very soon. 

And if you want to tackle its 26 carbon stars, please search back in time to 23rd February 2019 on the Astrophysics Forum here on Cloudy Nights. 

You will see my complete list of each one. 

Much patience will be required to seek out them all. 

(It took me 2 years to achieve my goal). 

 

I wish you the very best. 

If you think that is too much, please relax and simply enjoy picking out one carbon star at a time in any constellation. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey (FLT 158).  


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#21 CrazyPanda

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 07:57 PM

Best one ever is the one in the gap between the clusters in the Double Cluster. Super obvious.

Is that a carbon star or just a red giant? It's nowhere near as deep red as T-Lyrae or other carbon stars are.


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#22 RubyCruxis

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 08:51 PM

Another vote for DY Crucis or Ruby Crucis as it is also known. The very close proximity of this blood red carbon star to the colour contrasting blue-white B class giant Mimosa (Beta Crucis) makes this pair one of my absolute favourite astronomical targets with any telescope. If you live far enough south to be able to view this, you won't be dissappointed I promise.

 

 


Edited by RubyCruxis, 08 August 2019 - 08:55 PM.

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#23 timokarhula

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 04:25 AM

Ditto.  The first time I saw Ruby Crucis (also known as Espin-Birmingham 365) 20 years ago, I thought the red star was a reflexion from Beta Crucis.  Ruby Crucis looked so unreal to me and was extremely contrasty to the blue-white Mimosa.  Ruby Crucis has a B-magnitude of 15 and it is thanks to its strong emission in red light that it is at all visible in small instruments as a 9th magnitude star.

 

/Timo Karhula


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#24 chrysalis

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 02:28 PM

R Leporis (Hind's Crimson Star). One evening, using my Intelliscope and COL, I went through the list of "Variable Stars" that were up; most of which were carbon starts or similar; all of which exhibited colors ranging from golden through red. Lots of fun!


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#25 Cames

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 04:42 PM

Many carbon stars are indicated with "( c )" in the Sky &Telescope Pocket Sky Atlas.  Many of us already own that reference.

 

Some carbon stars seem to lose a little of their beauty when trying to shine through the greenish airglow. Airglow contaminates the red and gives the carbon star a brownish tint.  I have noticed that when I'm using a  broadband filter that removes the airglow and that possesses a wide, red passband, the red comes shining through. It becomes much easier to separate carbon stars from the others.

 

I'm not sure why the ultra-red ones like T Lyr and Hinds Crimson seem to be able to burn through the airglow with ease. If you have access to such a filter, give it a try.  There's almost a qualitative difference between carbon stars and normal ones.

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