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Last Rites to a Dying Soldier...

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#1 SMark

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 01:08 AM

I present to you a war hero. In the heat of battle he unselfishly gave his all so that other soldiers could live on to serve the next generation. He gave new life to many, and for this he is well honored...

 

                                                                   usa.gifsalute.gif  usa.gif

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Edited by SMark, 08 August 2019 - 01:12 AM.

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#2 SMark

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 01:09 AM

...

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#3 PEterW

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 01:16 AM

Coryable?

#4 SMark

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 01:20 AM

Coryable?

I sent Cory a bunch of these SARD Mark 43's to refurbish, many of them needing spare parts. So this one was chosen to be the parts donor for all the rest.



#5 Corcaroli78

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 03:14 AM

I sent Cory a bunch of these SARD Mark 43's to refurbish, many of them needing spare parts. So this one was chosen to be the parts donor for all the rest.

Then this fallen one will live forever in the body of the part recipients lol.gif

 

What do you do with all refurbished SARD´s? are they going to your collection?

 

Last week I "rescued" a Zeiss 7x40 DF. Did I need a second one? No, but i was not able to let it pass and was interested in the restoration project... OMG, I must stop duplicating binos !!!

 

Carlos


Edited by Corcaroli78, 08 August 2019 - 03:29 AM.


#6 SMark

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 04:16 PM

Then this fallen one will live forever in the body of the part recipients lol.gif

 

What do you do with all refurbished SARD´s? are they going to your collection?

 

Last week I "rescued" a Zeiss 7x40 DF. Did I need a second one? No, but i was not able to let it pass and was interested in the restoration project... OMG, I must stop duplicating binos !!!

 

Carlos

Great point. It will live on! 

 

I have been enjoying and then selling the refurbished binoculars. I list them here in the classifieds and on eBay. I will keep one for myself. It's a project I have undertaken in honor of my dad, who was a WW2 veteran and Purple Heart recipient. In my eyes, he was also a WW2 hero who saved the lives of 20 fellow soldiers. The project was to take 20 of these Mark 43 binoculars that were in unusable condition, and make them as close to new as possible so that they can be enjoyed by future generations for the great binoculars that they were and are.

 

My dad was among the first troops to invade Germany on foot near the end of the war. In the ensuing chaos, he was called on to provide cover for the other soldiers by engaging a rather large German resistance by himself for short period of time. While doing so he took a bullet to the head and was left for dead as the German resistance overtook his position. He was out cold for an unspecified period of time. But he later regained consciousness and dragged himself to a service road where he was then found by an allied medical vehicle. 


Edited by SMark, 08 August 2019 - 04:23 PM.

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#7 Rich V.

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Posted 08 August 2019 - 05:18 PM

 

 

My dad was among the first troops to invade Germany on foot near the end of the war. In the ensuing chaos, he was called on to provide cover for the other soldiers by engaging a rather large German resistance by himself for short period of time. While doing so he took a bullet to the head and was left for dead as the German resistance overtook his position. He was out cold for an unspecified period of time. But he later regained consciousness and dragged himself to a service road where he was then found by an allied medical vehicle. 

Your dad has my appreciation as well.  waytogo.gif   Guys like him were the liberators of POWs like my dad that were held in German Stalags.  My dad spent the last year of the war in several Stalag Luft camps after being shot down over Poland after bombing a synthetic fuel plant.

 

Boy, were the POWs glad to see guys like your dad come and liberate them.

 

Rich


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#8 SMark

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 01:38 AM

Your dad has my appreciation as well.  waytogo.gif   Guys like him were the liberators of POWs like my dad that were held in German Stalags.  My dad spent the last year of the war in several Stalag Luft camps after being shot down over Poland after bombing a synthetic fuel plant.

 

Boy, were the POWs glad to see guys like your dad come and liberate them.

 

Rich

In total, WW2 is such a huge story. And for most of my life it was just a war in the past. My dad spoke very little about his service in the war. And it was only months before he passed away that he told us his story. Growing up, I knew that my dad was missing an eyebrow because he took a German bullet there during the war. But that's all I knew about it. My dad was still 17 when he graduated high school in 1944. The next day, he and his friends from school were all down at the recruiting office enlisting in the US Army. Of course, he told them he was already 18, but he actually wouldn't turn 18 for another 6 months. So he was just 17 when all this happened to him. The Greatest Generation, indeed.


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#9 Foss

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 08:39 AM

Hats off to your dad for giving so much to his country, Mark. Bringing 20 SARDS back to life is a cool way to commemorate him. How far along the trail are you?

Jack



#10 Mad Matt

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 02:26 PM

That is an amazing story Smark! I hope the next batch is ready soon, I have some funds set aside now 😁

#11 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 11:49 PM

That cannibalized  one is missing the  plastic focusing   grips.  So, presumably  one of the  others which have passed your way needed them.  But you told us in a recent post that none of   your   6 x 42 hoard  had  needed   that part, after I described how I been forced to make  some from  Delrin.   ??? 

 

Are there any   remaining   for others to   pursue?  Are you in a region   where  many of those   concentrated postwar?

I have several  already,  all  acquired  singly in the 1970's,   so  am not   chasing those.


Edited by Gordon Rayner, 11 August 2019 - 11:50 PM.


#12 SMark

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 01:13 AM

That cannibalized  one is missing the  plastic focusing   grips.  So, presumably  one of the  others which have passed your way needed them.  But you told us in a recent post that none of   your   6 x 42 hoard  had  needed   that part, after I described how I been forced to make  some from  Delrin.   ??? 

 

Are there any   remaining   for others to   pursue?  Are you in a region   where  many of those   concentrated postwar?

I have several  already,  all  acquired  singly in the 1970's,   so  am not   chasing those.

I sent that one to Cory to use as a parts donor for the current lot, and I just now received it back. It was sent primarily as a prism donor since I knew there were a few cracked prisms amongst the lot. So I can now assume that they also encountered the cracked grips as well. I've gotten most of my Mark 43's from eBay and Goodwill. I generally look for the abused ones that few will bid on. But I do occasionally win the nicer ones. They all come back from Suddarth Optical looking really good...

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Edited by SMark, 12 August 2019 - 01:13 AM.

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#13 Foss

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 10:19 AM

bow.gif

 

^^^

The binos, not you Mark. ha ha


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#14 Corcaroli78

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 10:35 AM

I sent that one to Cory to use as a parts donor for the current lot, and I just now received it back. It was sent primarily as a prism donor since I knew there were a few cracked prisms amongst the lot. So I can now assume that they also encountered the cracked grips as well. I've gotten most of my Mark 43's from eBay and Goodwill. I generally look for the abused ones that few will bid on. But I do occasionally win the nicer ones. They all come back from Suddarth Optical looking really good...

It is amazing how these binos look like after service! 



#15 SMark

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 11:07 PM

Hats off to your dad for giving so much to his country, Mark. Bringing 20 SARDS back to life is a cool way to commemorate him. How far along the trail are you?

Jack

If that German bullet had hit him an inch higher, it would have gone into his brain. And if it had been an inch lower, it would have gone through his left eye. Both likely fatal. He had a guardian angel that day...

 

I just sent Cory #15.


Edited by SMark, 12 August 2019 - 11:08 PM.

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#16 Cestus

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 01:48 PM

Wow, those binoculars saw some heavy service.


Edited by Cestus, 13 August 2019 - 02:28 PM.


#17 EverlastingSky

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 07:47 PM

Wow Mark, that example looks pristine, the best one I have yet seen! waytogo.gif Suddarth worked some magic on those alright. I really should buy one of these 6x42 SARD... been saying it for a couple of years now. What is it like to scan the Milky Way star fields from a dark site with a pair of these 6x42 with a whopping 12° field? crazyeyes.gif


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#18 SMark

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 10:52 PM

Wow Mark, that example looks pristine, the best one I have yet seen! waytogo.gif Suddarth worked some magic on those alright. I really should buy one of these 6x42 SARD... been saying it for a couple of years now. What is it like to scan the Milky Way star fields from a dark site with a pair of these 6x42 with a whopping 12° field? crazyeyes.gif

I really enjoy sweeping the Milky Way with this binocular. It takes that "Porthole into Space" effect to the max. 


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#19 davidmcgo

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 09:02 PM

Thanks for sharing your father’s story and for resurrecting these optics!  My dad and my uncles were mostly US Navy in WW2.  My dad was on the USS Concorde (CL-10) in the Aleutian Islands campaign as a gunnery officer and one of the stories I got from him involved him taking a radio and some Marines ashore in the Kuriles and climbing a mountain to call in gunfire on one of the Japanese bases there when the fog was too thick to see from the ship.

 

Most of my uncles were driving ships in the island hopping across the Pacific and another went Army Air Corps as a radioman on a C47 flying the Hump from India to take supplies to Chiang Kai Shek’s forces in China.

 

It is pretty wild to think of having to use these vintage optics for war and survival and how much of a difference they could make.  If you were an airman downed in the Pacific, these Mark 43s in the hands of a spotter on a PBY meant life.  If you were in an enemy sub, possibly death.  Now they bring a fantastic view of the Milky Way and a respect for our fathers and their generation and all they did for us.

 

Dave


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#20 Grimnir

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 05:34 AM

This is, without question, one of the very finest threads I've ever read on Cloudy Nights.

 

As Mark says, they were indeed The Greatest Generation.

 

We are all profoundly indebted to them.

 

Graham


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#21 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 12:20 AM

RE  #19

 

I saw a 6 x 42 collection  ( owner now RIP )  which were   similar to the handheld  version,  but  which   were  heavier, no plastic,   adapted for fixed, or semi- fixed  mounted use   on what  I guessed  were  the Martin Mars  and similar  flying boats,  for   antisubmarine patrols  in the Atlantic.  The idea was to see  U-Boot   wakes  at night, when they  were running on the surface  to charge  their batteries.     Maybe they were used on the PBY  also.   I once had  a similar  6 x 42, fixed focus,  made in Pasadena,    for mounting in the nose of the P-61 Black Widow  night fighter

 

A PBY was my first airplane ride,  from Oakland, Calif.  to  Newport, Oregon,  prior to  employment as   a summer job  crewmember for in-port maintenance  on two week  duration  shifts.  One of the pilots let me ride  in the right  cockpit seat.  Noisy.    The boats were  basically Gulf Coast shrimpers  adapted  for explosive seismic  oil exploration  by a Shell Oil subsidiary.    I served one two week  offshore stint  when one of the regular  crew  was absent.   There  are many albatrosses  off the Oregon and Washington coasts,  if one  watches  from perhaps 20  or 30 miles  offshore.  I fed  kitchen   scraps to them.    We saw a large sunfish one day,  but never any whales  or dolphins.   

 

Once,  the geologists  set off a charge too close  to the boat.   I was in my bunk.  It was  as though someone was beating  the hull  with a sledgehammer.  Similar to a  U_Boot  under depth  charge attack,  I suppose.   The Norwegian captain  was angry  .  " That was too close".

 

About the "over the hump"  anecdote,  above.      A longtime  family friend,  a biologist colleague of my father,  was at Myitkina in Burma  as a radio  controller for   the  flights to Kunming.   He hitched a ride  once,     thru a pass below  some peaks.   I do not know if the C-47 - DC-3  were supercharged.  His brother , a B-17 pilot,  was killed  in a raid upon a  synthetic  fuel plant,not far from Jena , IIRC , in late 1944.   

 

 

.

My father was a Lt.  JG.  in malaria control  at  Samar,  and later at  Tsingtao.  


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#22 davidmcgo

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 04:34 PM

Woo hoo!  Just got mine from SMark yesterday and they are absolutely fantastic.  They fit all of Sagitta and the Coathanger cluster and Alberio with room to spare and the Coathanger recognizable as such even fairly near the field edge.  Amazingly comfortable on the eyes, pretty well controlled distortion and stars stay reasonable across the field. Very heavy but balanced and at 6x, absolutely no distracting jiggle.

 

Saturn was a tiny oval in a huge field of stars, Jupiter a disk.  No spiking, or anything.  The whole bottom hook of Scorpius all fits in the field too.  Really good depth of focus, the palm tree across the street was nearly at same focus as the Stinger and M6 and M7.

 

Can't wait to get them to the desert this weekend for some dark skies!

 

Dave


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#23 Yarddog

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 05:17 PM

Interesting stories.

 

My Father was also in the European theater of operations. His Battalion, the 208th Engineer Combat Battalion, landed in Normandy and ended up In Liege Belgium at the end. I have no idea why they detoured to Belgium as they were deep into Germany and met up with Russians at one point.

 

They were sent into Berlin after the war ended. Maybe two years ago the Daughter of one of the men of the Battalion contacted as many of the children of the 208th as she could and gathered as many photos as she could. She then scanned all of them to several CDs. I now have several hundred photos of the Battalion from England to the Battalion being disbanded and sent home by Lt. Col. Scott in 11/45.

 

Many of them historically interesting. Many of Russian troops including Russian WACs who Daddy said were actually nice girls.

 

The 208th did things which now seem impossible. Absolutely unbelievable. Daddy did not earn any medals other than the ones everyone got. He did bring home a Luger, a P-38, a Leica which was new in the box when he got it and an ICA folding camera.


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