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micrometeorites

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#1 lordgordons

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 12:43 PM

Hello all,

 

I want a microscope to study micrometeorites (size = 50 microns to 2mm).  If known, what would be the typical magnification?  It would seem to me that the light source would be above the micrometeorite.  Is there a preferred microscope for this application?  At some point, I would like to get plan eyepieces, which I have heard are better than the eyepieces typically sold with the microscope.  I would prefer something less than $300.00 if possible.  Being new to microscopes - and with a lot of confusing information out there - I thought it best to ask people who have done this.  

 

As a secondary purpose, a biological-type microscope is preferred.

 

Is there a microscope good for both?

 

FYI: I have already contacted AmScope (they recommended a compound microscope) and Omax; I have also looked at the Meiji and Leitz brands.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Gordon



#2 Microscopy

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Posted 16 August 2019 - 09:13 AM

Hello all,

 

[... ]Is there a microscope good for both? [...]

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Gordon

Yes there is, but not for $300, not even second/third/fourth hand...

Pretty much any system microscope can be equiped for both transmitted and reflected light (the list is endless) but a complete set is difficult to find and always far more expensive than $300.



#3 EJN

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 08:38 PM

Here's a timely article on micrometeorites in this month's Micscape:

 

http://www.microscop...dh-Stardust.pdf


Edited by EJN, 19 August 2019 - 08:38 PM.

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#4 Tom Stock

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 09:47 PM

Hello all,

 

I want a microscope to study micrometeorites (size = 50 microns to 2mm).  If known, what would be the typical magnification?  It would seem to me that the light source would be above the micrometeorite.  Is there a preferred microscope for this application?  At some point, I would like to get plan eyepieces, which I have heard are better than the eyepieces typically sold with the microscope.  I would prefer something less than $300.00 if possible.  Being new to microscopes - and with a lot of confusing information out there - I thought it best to ask people who have done this.  

 

As a secondary purpose, a biological-type microscope is preferred.

 

Is there a microscope good for both?

 

FYI: I have already contacted AmScope (they recommended a compound microscope) and Omax; I have also looked at the Meiji and Leitz brands.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Gordon

I am new to microscopes so don't assume anything I say is correct until someone else chimes in... but... 

 

What about something like this? 

 

AmScope SE306R-PZ-LED or Model No: SE306R-P20

 

I've seen those on ebay new for around $85

 

Or.. if you want more magnification for biology, you could two: A stereo scope, and compound monocular microscope and still be around $300 total.

 

There are also plenty of vintage compound microscopes on ebay which are probably quality better than an AmScope anyway for $50-$150

 

Curious to see what others say.


Edited by Tom Stock, 21 August 2019 - 10:02 PM.


#5 j.gardavsky

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 02:54 PM

Hello Tom,

 

for the micrometeorites, I would prefer the incident light microsopes.

 

As these are expensive, you can take any standard microscope with the long working distance objectives to have enough space left for an illuminating lamp.

 

These objectives are signed  as a rule with L, LL and similar.

The objective magnification around 20x, and the numeric aperture of 0.40 are the maximum.

The best choice are the planar (Pl) fuoride (Fl) objectives

https://www.ebay.de/...gEAAOSwoahcwdpJ

followed by the planar achromatic objectives

https://www.ebay.de/...DUAAOSwUGxdZsRN

 

Quite important is the right match of an eyepiece to the objective.

 

Another possibility is to take a discontinued ZEISS West STEMI (stereo microscope), the Leicas are too expensive.

With the STEMI you can zoom in, and with the added front lenses you can even increase the magnification.

 

I am using for observing the cell structures in the petrified extinct Permian farns the old Leitz Diascope and an old ZEISS STEMI.

 

Tomorrow, when I have more time, I will post some pics,

JG



#6 j.gardavsky

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 08:35 AM

Hello Gordon, hello all,

 

here are my gallery pics of the ZEISS Stemi and Leitz Dialux microscopes,

and a pic of a snow agate in a silicified fossil Permian farn,

https://www.cloudyni...919-microscopy/

 

Best,

JG



#7 gregj888

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 09:46 PM

The most interesting is a SEM with EDS so you can do elemental analysis.  I have the SEM in my "shop" (I sell them so it's not fair, but no EDS at the moment).  We do some outreach and I have a few in High Schools and micro micrometeorites a really fun projects to do with students.  Sorry, just had to throw that in :-)  

 

Another option are the  Petrographic microscopes with polarizers.  

 https://en.wikipedia...phic_microscope

 

I also have a basic Motic SZ168 with ring light.  It's my general purpose microscope for sample prep, soldering, splinters and so on.

 

You can find reticle eyepieces with scales on Ebay that will fit most microscopes.  With one of those you can make reasonable measurements.  



#8 j.gardavsky

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 04:39 AM

The most interesting is a SEM with EDS so you can do elemental analysis.  I have the SEM in my "shop" (I sell them so it's not fair, but no EDS at the moment).  We do some outreach and I have a few in High Schools and micro micrometeorites a really fun projects to do with students.  Sorry, just had to throw that in :-)  

 

Another option are the  Petrographic microscopes with polarizers.  

 https://en.wikipedia...phic_microscope

 

I also have a basic Motic SZ168 with ring light.  It's my general purpose microscope for sample prep, soldering, splinters and so on.

 

You can find reticle eyepieces with scales on Ebay that will fit most microscopes.  With one of those you can make reasonable measurements.  

The ZEISS Stemi has both the incident spot light and the ring light.

Who does not have it?

Its optics is parfocal with the modern Leica HC Plan eyepieces, as shown on the pic, where the Zeiss eyepieces have been replaced with the more comfortable for me Leicas.

 

The Leica Dialux system is both for the classic and the phase contrast microscopy.

It is also convertible for the both 160 and 170 standards - no hassle when using different objectives.

The polarization and fluorescence accessorie are in a drawer, so the petrography is not a problem, even if not done at the moment.

The measurement reticles can be mounted in all Leitz MF eyepieces, a few reticles are in the drawer.

 

I am not selling microscopes, but been in this hobby for a while, supporting also the independent paleontology research with my microphotography.

Another hobby of mine is collecting and refurbishing the vintage 19th century Zeiss and Leitz microscopes.



#9 555aaa

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Posted 22 April 2020 - 02:10 AM

Way back in the early 1980s I did a little micrometeorite project with Don Brownlee at UW. They had a big SEM with an electron microprobe and I spent a fair amount of time trying to collect dust from rainfall or other sources, but mostly I got junk, it turned out. Hopefully the air is cleaner now.  I agree with JG above, you want something with long working distance objectives, maybe a used metallurgical microscope? You can get pretty creative however with just about anything; you can also sneak some light in using an optical fiber to illuminate the sample.



#10 j.gardavsky

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Posted 22 April 2020 - 06:12 AM

There are the Leitz L and LL microscope objectives for the long working distance on the eBay, for the typical prices 60 EUR up to 120 EUR.

Here is one of mines,

 

Leitz LL 20x 0,40 NA.jpg

 

JG


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#11 ANKry

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Posted 23 April 2020 - 12:29 PM

https://www.cloudyni...ese-meteorites/

 

There is another topic about micrometeorites. I photograph the sand at a large scale of 5: 1. Then I go through the magnetic separator and photograph the fraction attracted by the magnet. I do a photo 5: 1 without a microscope using a macroinstallation.




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