Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

ASI120MC-S vs Canon 80D for planetary

  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 aatdalton

aatdalton

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 74
  • Joined: 05 Feb 2019

Posted 14 August 2019 - 08:33 PM

So I've run across some interesting numbers looking deeper into my gear. The root of it is that my Canon 80 and ASI120MC-S have almost exactly the same pixel size. So here's my question: which is a better option for planetary video capture (for later processing)? Here's some relevant specs.

 

Canon 80D

  • Pixel size: 3.75 micron
  • Sensor size: APS-C
  • Max video: 60 fps @ 1920x1080 full sensor
  • Crop video: 30 fps @ 3-10x digitial zoom

ASI120MC-S

 

  • Pixel size: 3.75 micron
  • Sensor size: real small
  • Max video: 60 fps @ 1280x960 full sensor
  • Faster video: 168 fps @ 1280x400
  • Fastest video: 254 fps @ 320x240

 

I'm either going to be imaging through an 8" dob and manually tracking or using a 130mm newt on a mount. Any ideas or lines to think along? Am I totally looking past something else relevant? 



#2 Tulloch

Tulloch

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 350
  • Joined: 02 Mar 2019
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 14 August 2019 - 08:47 PM

Hi there, I've been imaging the planets with my Canon 700D for about 6 months now and it works pretty well. I've got some pretty good images of the planets with it (check my CN gallery for examples) but I've decided to make the jump to the ZWO ASI224MC. 

 

I'll make the following observations about using a Canon DSLR for planetary:

   - the Canon system is the best DSLR for planetary, as long as you stream the Liveview images straight to your computer at 5x zoom (details here). The max framerate I could achieve is 20 fps. Don't use the video modes.

https://www.astropix...resolution.html

   - since you already have a DSLR, it is the cheapest way to get into the hobby. After you've been doing it for a while you will know if you want to continue (and purchase a better camera) or not. If not, you haven't blown $200 on a camera you'll never use again

   - If you want to start with your DSLR, get yourself a dedicated piece of software (I use BackyardEOS), it's great for both DSO and planetary work.

   - I have an alt/az goto mount, it makes pointing and tracking objects soooo much easier

 

Check out what is possible in Tom Glenn's recent post with a $200 6" Newtonian and an ASI224. This is the image that tipped me over the edge to get a dedicated planetary camera.

https://www.cloudyni...august-11-2019/

 

Hope this helps,

 

Andrew


Edited by Tulloch, 14 August 2019 - 09:01 PM.


#3 aatdalton

aatdalton

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 74
  • Joined: 05 Feb 2019

Posted 14 August 2019 - 09:03 PM

Hi there, I've been imaging the planets with my Canon 700D for about 6 months now and it works pretty well. I've got some pretty good images of the planets with it (check my CN gallery for examples) but I've decided to make the jump to the ZWO ASI224MC. 

 

I'll make the following observations about using a Canon DSLR for planetary:

   - the Canon system is the best DSLR for planetary, as long as you stream the Liveview images straight to your computer at 5x zoom (details here). The max framerate I could achieve is 20 fps. Don't use the video modes.

https://www.astropix...resolution.html

   - since you already have a DSLR, it is the cheapest way to get into the hobby. After you've been doing it for a while you will know if you want to continue (and purchase a better camera) or not. If not, you haven't blown $200 on a camera you'll never use again

   - If you want to start with your DSLR, get yourself a dedicated piece of software (I use BackyardEOS), it's great for both DSO and planetary work.

   - I have an alt/az goto mount, it makes pointing and tracking objects soooo much easier

 

Check out what is possible in Tom Glenn's recent post with a $200 6" Newtonian and an ASI224. This is the image that tipped me over the edge to get a dedicated planetary camera.

https://www.cloudyni...august-11-2019/

 

Hope this helps,

 

Andrew

Thanks for the tips. I already have the 120MC-S and have been using it for auto-guiding. But I chose it because I knew I could dual purpose it for planetary as well. (and it was real cheap.)



#4 Tulloch

Tulloch

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 350
  • Joined: 02 Mar 2019
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 14 August 2019 - 09:08 PM

Thanks for the tips. I already have the 120MC-S and have been using it for auto-guiding. But I chose it because I knew I could dual purpose it for planetary as well. (and it was real cheap.)

OK, I'd probably go for the 120 then (should've read your sig first smile.gif ).

 

Andrew




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics