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Solar Weather Update - Capture the Moment!

astrophotography imaging imaging/sketching contest solar optics
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#1 LuntSolar

LuntSolar

    Vendor (Lunt Solar Systems)

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 11:42 AM

Solar News & Astrophotography Contest Round #2

Capture the beauty and the power of our sun and enter your image to be in our next astrophotography contest for another shot at a $200 Lunt Solar Systems Gift Card.

 

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Solar News

 

The sun is only 93 million miles away from us, but solar activity can have interesting effects here on Earth as well as right outside our atmosphere. That is why many are interested in studying the changes in the sun's activity and what it means for us.

 

Our sun famously cycles through its highs and lows every 11 years. Its quieter periods are known as solar minimum in comparison to its more violent and turbulent times, known as solar maximum. Studying the surface of the sun for dark patches, known as sun spots are one of the many ways physicists monitor solar cycles.

 

 

Short-lived patches are due to intense solar magnetic activity. The larger amounts of sunspots indicates the transition between solar minimum and maximum.

 

On occasion, the sun spots can erupt to powerful solar storms that are able to emit streams of charged flares and particles into space- sometimes in Earth's direction. This can have an effect on our power grids and satellites that orbit around our planet.

 

As the sun transitions from one solar cycle to another is can be an interesting opportunity to witness the natural phenomena through the lens of our solar telescopes. Capture the progression of the end of a solar cycle and the beginning of a new.

 

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Earlier this month on August 2nd, 2019 the NOA SWPC issued a solar storm watch after a coronal hole was facing Earth.

 

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The coronal hole had caused solar wind speeds of over 600km/s and with the north-south direction of the solar magnetic field pointing mostly south. In turn, this creates a stunning auroral ovals in our very atmosphere. Perfect for high altitude aurora watchers.

 

On August 13th 2019, an unexpected solar explosion interrupted a solar minimum. If the explosion had been facing Earth and hit our atmosphere, solar magnetism would've caused strong auroras and other effects to our planet. Even during a solar minimum, explosions like those can happen unexpectedly and at any time.

 

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Experience the fury and the ever-changing dynamic of our flaming star and witness our sun through our high-quality solar telescopes.

 

 

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Solar Astrophotography Contest #2

Capture the beauty and the power of our sun and enter your image to be in our next astrophotography contest. Submit your entry today! Voting for the winning image begins September 1st, 2019. Join the competition for a chance to win a $200 Lunt Solar Systems Gift Card and have your photo shared on our social media and future newsletters. The contest starts today, so get your scopes ready and show us what you can capture!

 

Professional solar astrophotographers and space enthusiasts alike are welcome to join in on the fun.

 

The rules are simple:

 

  • The image must have been captured within the last 6 months.
  • Must be your own image. By submitting, you agree to allow Lunt to add your image to our gallery and potentially use in future promotions (credit will be given to the photographer).
  • A Lunt Solar System Scope must be used to take the image.
  • Your submission must include all relevant technical data including:
    • ‚ÄčLunt Scope and camera used
    • Exposure time
    • Stacked or single image
    • Software used for capture
    • Processing and colorization

Feel free to add any additional information to your submission.

 

Ready to enter?

 

Submit Your Image

 

 

Previous Winning Image:

ISS Solar Transit 06/12/2019 - Lunt LS100THa single stack
Photographer: mgsmith1983

 

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Edited by LuntSolar, 15 August 2019 - 11:45 AM.



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