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Any little Mak fans here?

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#26 Hesiod

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:05 PM

I like them very much as travel telescopes and for wildlife, and for these purpose I prefer them to refractors

gallery_215679_8115_2334460.jpg

 

gallery_215679_8115_517477.jpg

 

gallery_215679_8115_1297190.jpg

 

What I like most is that their sizes match those of much smaller refractors, so performances will be the same, or better for the MCTs:

gallery_215679_8115_2418226.jpg

 

55mm vs 95mm leaves little room to guess who won on faint fuzzies, even if the former is more "efficient"...however the actual sizes are very close, and both can ride the same "mount", while a 90-100mm refractor could not (and, among 80mm ones, just the smaller such as the ST80, which has its own set of issues)


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#27 pdxmoon

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:22 PM

I like them very much as travel telescopes and for wildlife, and for these purpose I prefer them to refractors

gallery_215679_8115_2334460.jpg

 

gallery_215679_8115_517477.jpg

 

gallery_215679_8115_1297190.jpg

 

What I like most is that their sizes match those of much smaller refractors, so performances will be the same, or better for the MCTs:

gallery_215679_8115_2418226.jpg

 

55mm vs 95mm leaves little room to guess who won on faint fuzzies, even if the former is more "efficient"...however the actual sizes are very close, and both can ride the same "mount", while a 90-100mm refractor could not (and, among 80mm ones, just the smaller such as the ST80, which has its own set of issues)

The faint fuzzies may be faint, but I'll bet those little guys are great all purpose lunar scopes!


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#28 Boom

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:28 PM

I like them very much as travel telescopes and for wildlife, and for these purpose I prefer them to refractors

 

What tripod is that you mounted the Vixen's on?



#29 Stevegeo

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 04:30 PM

I m another big fan of MAKs,  with 3 C90s  one as a spotter on a C8, one solo on a vhs tripod, one a spotter on my 10in Meade... And my latest thanks to another CN member, a Meade that I have used traveling all over. 

Lighter then the C90   it fits easily in my carry-on . And all easy to use... Point and look.

IMG_20190501_105942.jpg love these little beasts....


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#30 PXR-5

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 06:00 PM

Big fan here also :)

My 90 and 127 are my most used scopes.
Why? The EP position does not move as much as other designs, that means my back doesn't have to.

You can't beat comfort :)
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#31 terraclarke

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 07:15 PM

I love my little Mak! It’s 3.5” of joy! love.gif

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#32 Joe1950

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 07:28 PM

I use a binoviewer. Since they split the light, some feel objects are dim. Plus, a 90mm ETX at f/13.8 is often said to run out of light before running out of detail. My ETX is one of the first generation that were specifically made to compete with the Questar.  How they do or not I don’t know. But the optics are very good. We won’t talk about the mount.

 

Anyhow, I took it out on a simple alt-az and plugged in the binoviewer.

 

I was astonished by the brightness of both Jupiter and Saturn, and especially the contrast. Seeing was not good, but the detail was there. Jupiter’s belts had good edge detail, I could see the GRS, no problem, and the whitish belt right under the SEB! 

 

Saturn was not as bright, but bright enough with a few color bands and an easy Cassini Division. 

 

It was more than I expected. So the ETX will get its time in use. The whole setup is so light and easy it almost floats outside. I’m sure it will do great when the moon swings around again.

 

 


Edited by Joe1950, 17 August 2019 - 08:50 PM.

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#33 PXR-5

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 08:06 PM

I love my little Mak! It’s 3.5” of joy! love.gif


Show off :)
Sweet
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#34 pdxmoon

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 08:31 PM

I love my little Mak! It’s 3.5” of joy! love.gif

That thing is like looking through a painting. It’s gorgeous,


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#35 Richard Whalen

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 08:48 PM

I used to own 90mm, 4" and 5" MCTs. Did not find them all that useful for one reason or another. I prefer MCTs in the 7" to 10" range. For small scopes I much perfered my 110mm f7 apo.



#36 PXR-5

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 08:55 PM

I used to own 90mm, 4" and 5" MCTs. Did not find them all that useful for one reason or another. I prefer MCTs in the 7" to 10" range. For small scopes I much perfered my 110mm f7 apo.


I get back pain occasionally, so I like real short tubes.

A 110 f7 is a nice scope, but the EP end varies too much for my comfort.

Truth be told, I miss my 14" Dob, but that moved several feet LOL
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#37 khingdheano

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 11:34 PM

My Skywatcher Virtuoso 90mm Mak is the perfect grab-n-go scope. 



#38 Hesiod

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 04:41 AM

The faint fuzzies may be faint, but I'll bet those little guys are great all purpose lunar scopes!

I use them mostly for DSOs, but the M500 is indeed excellent for quick Moon sessions too



#39 Hesiod

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 04:46 AM

What tripod is that you mounted the Vixen's on?

It is a photographic tripod by NovoFlex, BasicBall is the name.

It is fundamentally a table-top tripod (and as such has very good payload and stability), but through optional rods may be raised enough to be employed with comfort while sitting on low camping stools, even if this means a substantial reduction of its stability.

The best feature is that the longest piece is 30cm long, and the whole tripod is really light, so I keep as backup in my travel bag or hand luggage


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#40 grif 678

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 06:51 AM

I would love to see a picture of how you mounted the OTA!

Can't do pictures, but I took a 4 inch dovetail and bolted to the base of the ETX using the existing holes. ( This will also make it accesable to many mounts)  Then the base of the unitron mount also has two holes that the rings bolt onto. I just removed the rings. Masilmw (CN user ID) made me two aluminum blocks about inch long. They are made with the grooved top that a dovetail will fit into, and the bottom of those blocks has two holes in them ( really a great system ) I just bolted those two blocks onto the mount base through the existing holes in the mount. Then I set the dovetail into the top grooves, and tighten the nylon bolts that were also made into the side of the  aluminum blocks. It is really a neat looking system. Those blocks should me mass produced, they would really sell.

I am pretty sure that Masilmw would make some more, they are pretty cheap.


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#41 treadmarks

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 07:58 AM

The faint fuzzies may be faint, but I'll bet those little guys are great all purpose lunar scopes!

Indeed, but I wouldn't count out the little Mak for DSO. Look at this list of 500 good DSO for 4" refractors and 5" Maks.

 

The secret of what makes little Maks great is that you don't need a lot of telescope unless you're pushing the limits in some way. Maks are great lunar scopes, but I've never looked through any telescope and said "wow, the Moon looks terrible in this scope."

 

So under those conditions, when you're not trying to find some Mag. 12 galaxy you've never seen before, there's a strong argument that you may as well use the most convenient scope you have. And little Maks are hard to beat in that.


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#42 JohnH

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 09:23 AM

Here are a few truly "little" Maks. From L to R:

30mm, 40mm, 60mm Lomo Gregorian Maks, 50mm, 65mm Celestron spotting Maks, and a 70mm Lomo Astele Mak.

I thought about filling the gaps with the Pico 6 and 8, but their reviews weren't favorable. I would like to have an Ad Astra, though.

Maks.jpg


The Ad Astra IS nice. I have to send the primary in for recoating.

I plan on making a bunch in the 4.5 to 8 range, and posibly a number based on the solid cat
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#43 Eric63

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 09:53 PM

I love both my C90 and 127Mak. Great balcony scopes for condo living.
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#44 Jim1804

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 10:15 PM

Any little Mak fans? You have seen this thread, right?? :-)

 

https://www.cloudyni...-celestron-c90/


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#45 Jim1804

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 05:48 AM

Had to do an internet search to find this https://www.cloudyni...-celestron-c90/


Nicole - somehow I missed your post - you beat me to it! Great minds...
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#46 Jim1804

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 05:55 AM

Indeed, but I wouldn't count out the little Mak for DSO. Look at this list of 500 good DSO for 4" refractors and 5" Maks.

The secret of what makes little Maks great is that you don't need a lot of telescope unless you're pushing the limits in some way. Maks are great lunar scopes, but I've never looked through any telescope and said "wow, the Moon looks terrible in this scope."

So under those conditions, when you're not trying to find some Mag. 12 galaxy you've never seen before, there's a strong argument that you may as well use the most convenient scope you have. And little Maks are hard to beat in that.


Exactly. My C90 and ST80 are my most used scopes, especially for summertime “guerrilla astronomy” when I’m dodging storms most days - which scope depends on what I’m looking at. The extra focal length is great for quick peaks at planets and the moon - I wouldn’t have seen much of 2018’s Summer of Planets if it weren’t for the C90.
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#47 Joe1950

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 09:36 AM

I often wonder if the efforts of bigger scopes are worth it around where I live.

 

Start with the mosquito spray, lug out the mount, then the scope, out the door and down the steps, set up the chair, the eyepiece box... only to see Jupiter look like it’s under several inches of running creek water.

 

Give up right there and go back in. This is the usual summer routine.

 

Something to be said for quick out and back in. 


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#48 treadmarks

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:44 AM

I often wonder if the efforts of bigger scopes are worth it around where I live.

 

Start with the mosquito spray, lug out the mount, then the scope, out the door and down the steps, set up the chair, the eyepiece box... only to see Jupiter look like it’s under several inches of running creek water.

 

Give up right there and go back in. This is the usual summer routine.

 

Something to be said for quick out and back in. 

I always check Clear Sky Charts before taking out a telescope. Sometimes patience can pay off too. Seeing can vary from moment to moment, and I suspect not everything in my setup is cooled down all the way right when I get out.

 

Can't say that I'm always patient about it when all I can see is a tiny featureless white ball, while lights all around me are glaring in my eyes mad.gif


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#49 Dave Radosevich

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 12:09 PM

I picked up this little 5.5" Mak made by Max Bray back in the 70s. Beats my Quantum 6.. Who doesn't like a small Mak!

 

max_Mak1.jpg

 

 


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#50 Joe1950

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 12:44 PM

I always check Clear Sky Charts before taking out a telescope. Sometimes patience can pay off too. Seeing can vary from moment to moment, and I suspect not everything in my setup is cooled down all the way right when I get out.

 

Can't say that I'm always patient about it when all I can see is a tiny featureless white ball, while lights all around me are glaring in my eyes mad.gif

I hear you. Sometimes I preserve, but when the bugs are all over the place, the lights from houses and cars are blinding and the perspiration is dripping, my good intentions sour.

 

Better days are coming, hopefully when the planets get higher and into Autumn weather. It’s a slow process though.




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