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#1 csa/montana

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 06:16 PM

Let's continue the observation log, here.

 

Previous log


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#2 dustyc

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 06:20 PM

Aww, I wanted to see the old one tick over 10,000 replies!!


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#3 Pbinder

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 06:47 PM

I wanted us to go till the sun burnt out too. :(


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#4 SeaBee1

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 08:25 PM

I have been participating in Ed's Thread since the beginning... I thought that thread would go forever and was hoping it would... There may be days I may not check into another thread, but I always checked that one. I not only learned a lot, but made new friends there...

 

Well.. Ok, part 2... I'm in...

 

Keep looking up!

 

CB


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#5 BFaucett

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 12:11 AM

brent's comment from the original thread:

 

brentknight wrote:


Very nice repot, Bob.  I wonder what caused the rille?  It kinda looks like a great flow of something from the original crater that - over the distance slowed to a trickle...  Seem like no matter where you start on Luna, you will find something interesting.

 

Thanks!  Schroter's Valley is volcanic in origin.  From what little I've read about it, the "Cobra's Head" is the lava vent that was the source of the lava flow that created the meandering channel.  IMHO, I think it's kind of cool to be able to see a lava flow channel on the Moon.  I'm going to start looking into sinuous rilles and see if I can view some more of them with my small scopes.

 

I'm a complete novice when it comes to Lunar observing and identifying features but we all have to start somewhere. cool.gif   Frankly, I think the Moon deserves more respect and interest.  Ol' Luna must feel like Rodney Dangerfield...  I mean, we've got this entire other world that's only about 240,000 miles away from us and yet so many of us take it for granted or swear at it for spoiling the view of DSOs. undecided.gif

 

 

Sinuous Rilles

http://volcano.orego.../sinuous-rilles

 

Rilles, Cobra Head Volcano

http://andrewplanck....sites-in-space/

 

Title: The Moon - The Aristarchus Plateau
Authors: Douglass, E.
Journal: Journal of the Association of Lunar & Planetary Observers, The Strolling Astronomer

(ISSN 0039-2502), Vol. 43, No. 1, p. 8 - 10 (Winter 2001) Bibliographic Code: 2001JALPO..43a...8D

http://adsabs.harvar...JALPO..43a...8D

 

 

Cheers!  Bob F.  smile.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • Schroters-Valley-Cobra-Head-2.jpg

Edited by BFaucett, 18 August 2019 - 03:49 AM.

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#6 Migwan

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 05:49 AM

I've gotten to be such a night owl that when I happened to wake up at 3:30, I almost instinctively checked conditions.  Clear skies said to cloudy to forecast, but that seeing was average.  Huh?  I could see a bright moon glaring through the living room window.  Hmm!  

 

8/18/19 04:00 - 05:30 67°,  RH 97%, Wind calm, CPC1100 22T4 136x, ST120 APM30 UFF 20x

 

I know, but out I went into a washed out sky not worthy of a formal log.  Seriously, I was pretty happy to have a chance at "average seeing".   Checked for a carbon star between the double cluster.  Easy enough.   Andromeda's core was obvious, but if you didn't know better, you would not know it was a galaxy.  Its companions were not readily visible and I didn't even bother.  The Blinking Planetary Nebula was up to the task.  The dwarf was clearly visible and the shell was well focused, though not resolved within.   I could not see any blue in the blue snowball, but it too had well focused edges.  Who decided to call a summer target a snowball?  Never mind.  smile.gif 

 

Pleiades was fantastic approaching zenith, stars sharp as could be.  And down to the SSE near the horizon, M42.  Oddly, the lower wing was largely visible while the upper wing was almost absent.  The E star was easily visible, but I did not try to pick up the F star, not wanting to spend any time changing EPs. 

 

Lastly, Luna.  Have to go with Bob.  I should have respected the Moon.  First peek blinded me bad, leaving me searching one eyed for that moon filter.  Fantastic.  Could not find any shimmering anywhere.  Seeing had to be well above average for that to happen.  I reduced the CPC to 95x and the the moon was focused right to the edges.  Its hard to say for sure, but this may well have been my best view of the moon ever.  Features were so clear and distinct, even at 20x in the ST120.  So sharp.  

 

Though I do prefer DSOs and often cuss the moon, this morning with transparency rather poor and seeing so great, I had to be very thankful to have it around.   That said, I sure wish Jupiter had been up.  Oh well.  Can't have everything.

 

jd


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#7 BFaucett

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 06:23 AM

Date:  Sunday  Aug 18, 2019  |  Time:  approx  1:00 AM – 2:00 AM  CDT
Weather:  Temp 81 F | Humidity 92% | Clear
Scope:  Celestron C90 Mak  (FL = 1250 mm)
Eyepiece(s):  Meade 8-24 mm Zoom
Filter(s):  Orion Moon  25% transmission
 
 
Just another simple session of viewing the Moon.  (Waning gibbous - 92%)
 
Another clear night so I decided to view the Moon again for a short while.  I was just panning around, using various magnifications, when the crater Langrenus caught my eye near the terminator.  I decided to look around the area just to see what I could see.  I noticed a mountain range (I think) to the right (image reversed in the scope) of Langrenus.  I zoomed in for a better look.  My app didn’t identify the mountain range, so I’ll try to identify it later, but I enjoyed viewing it.  I also noticed a small crater below the mountains.  I then turned to my app to try to identify the small crater.  As I zoomed in on the area in the app, the crater’s name appeared.  It was crater Lindbergh.
 
I sat back and pondered my random “discovery”.  Charles Lindbergh was one of my heroes when I was growing up.  Back in the mid-sixties, when I was a kid, I saw the original Spirit of St. Louis airplane at the Smithsonian Museum.  I’ve read several biographies about him and also his book The Spirit of St. Louis.  I’ve also read several books written by his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh.  About 20 years ago, I flew on a business trip to Minneapolis.  While I was at the Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport, I noticed that I happened to be in the Lindbergh Terminal.  And there I was, all these years later, sitting on my patio with a small telescope looking at a crater on the Moon named after Charles Lindbergh.  Heck, I didn’t even know there was a crater named after him! 

Note: While writing this report, I checked and the crater is named after Charles Lindbergh.

See: https://planetarynam...ov/Feature/3408
 
While doing the Google search on the Lindbergh crater, I also came across what I consider to be another interesting connection between Charles Lindbergh and a crater.  It turns out that he was the first to photograph Meteor Crater in Arizona from the air back in 1929.
 
 

5cf1a6f62aeb3.image.jpg
 
Caption: This is the first aerial photograph ever taken of Meteor Crater, captured in 1929 by famed aviator Charles Lindbergh as he flew over northern Arizona.
 
See: Meteor Crater played role in aviation history
By KEVIN SCHINDLER - Special to the Daily Sun - Jan 28, 2017
https://azdailysun.c...06a9f0a056.html

  

 
And, there is another connection between Lindbergh and the Moon that I think is interesting.  From the article:
 
“Finally, Lindbergh played an important role in the development of space studies. Not only did his famous flight help advance air travel, but he became a close friend and staunch advocate of physicist/inventor Robert Goddard. Lindbergh spearheaded an effort to raise funds that allowed Goddard to develop the liquid-fueled rocket, which was critical to the development of missiles and the evolution of space travel.”

  

Well, I guess this really isn’t much of an actual observing report but I wanted to share my little “discovery” with our group.  I hope you guys don’t mind.

Cheers and remember to keep looking up!  Bob F. smile.gif

 

 

gallery_230527_11713_58587.jpg

Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh in 1930. The aircraft is a Lockheed Model 8 Sirius.  laugh.gif

See: THE LINDBERGHS’ FORGOTTEN FLIGHT TO THE ORIENT

https://www.historyn...rgh-canada.htm 

 

Celebrity Couple - a clip from "Anne Morrow Lindbergh: You'll Have the Sky"

StateoftheArtsNJ
Published on Mar 7, 2018

https://www.youtube....h?v=YY2TIYYP7Es

 

 

The area of crater Langrenus and crater Lindbergh:

 

gallery_230527_11713_55338.jpg

 

 

The following screenshots are from the “Moon Atlas 3D” app for Android. 
https://play.google....onAtlas3D&hl=en

The images are reversed left to right to match the view in my scope.

 

gallery_230527_11713_174608.jpg

  

 

Crater Lindbergh:

 

gallery_230527_11713_95703.jpg

 


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#8 brentknight

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 10:02 AM

I've gotten to be such a night owl that when I happened to wake up at 3:30, I almost instinctively checked conditions.  Clear skies said to cloudy to forecast, but that seeing was average.  Huh?  I could see a bright moon glaring through the living room window.  Hmm!  

 

8/18/19 04:00 - 05:30 67°,  RH 97%, Wind calm, CPC1100 22T4 136x, ST120 APM30 UFF 20x

 

I know, but out I went into a washed out sky not worthy of a formal log.  Seriously, I was pretty happy to have a chance at "average seeing".   Checked for a carbon star between the double cluster.  Easy enough.   Andromeda's core was obvious, but if you didn't know better, you would not know it was a galaxy.  Its companions were not readily visible and I didn't even bother.  The Blinking Planetary Nebula was up to the task.  The dwarf was clearly visible and the shell was well focused, though not resolved within.   I could not see any blue in the blue snowball, but it too had well focused edges.  Who decided to call a summer target a snowball?  Never mind.  smile.gif

 

Pleiades was fantastic approaching zenith, stars sharp as could be.  And down to the SSE near the horizon, M42.  Oddly, the lower wing was largely visible while the upper wing was almost absent.  The E star was easily visible, but I did not try to pick up the F star, not wanting to spend any time changing EPs. 

 

Lastly, Luna.  Have to go with Bob.  I should have respected the Moon.  First peek blinded me bad, leaving me searching one eyed for that moon filter.  Fantastic.  Could not find any shimmering anywhere.  Seeing had to be well above average for that to happen.  I reduced the CPC to 95x and the the moon was focused right to the edges.  Its hard to say for sure, but this may well have been my best view of the moon ever.  Features were so clear and distinct, even at 20x in the ST120.  So sharp.  

 

Though I do prefer DSOs and often cuss the moon, this morning with transparency rather poor and seeing so great, I had to be very thankful to have it around.   That said, I sure wish Jupiter had been up.  Oh well.  Can't have everything.

 

jd

I didn't think they allowed that kind of humidity up north - that's only for us poor sods on the Gulf Coast!

 

I just can't say enough good things about the little 120mm Orion.  It shows false color, especially on unfocused bright stars, but it never bothers me.  And it's so easy to use - it's just fun.  I don't ever want to look through an APO (or an ED) to discover how really poor the view is in the achro... grin.gif


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#9 brentknight

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 10:08 AM

brent's comment from the original thread:

 

 

Thanks!  Schroter's Valley is volcanic in origin.  From what little I've read about it, the "Cobra's Head" is the lava vent that was the source of the lava flow that created the meandering channel.  IMHO, I think it's kind of cool to be able to see a lava flow channel on the Moon.  I'm going to start looking into sinuous rilles and see if I can view some more of them with my small scopes.

 

I'm a complete novice when it comes to Lunar observing and identifying features but we all have to start somewherecool.gif   Frankly, I think the Moon deserves more respect and interest.  Ol' Luna must feel like Rodney Dangerfield...  I mean, we've got this entire other world that's only about 240,000 miles away from us and yet so many of us take it for granted or swear at it for spoiling the view of DSOs. undecided.gif

 

 

Sinuous Rilles

http://volcano.orego.../sinuous-rilles

 

Rilles, Cobra Head Volcano

http://andrewplanck....sites-in-space/

 

Title: The Moon - The Aristarchus Plateau
Authors: Douglass, E.
Journal: Journal of the Association of Lunar & Planetary Observers, The Strolling Astronomer

(ISSN 0039-2502), Vol. 43, No. 1, p. 8 - 10 (Winter 2001) Bibliographic Code: 2001JALPO..43a...8D

http://adsabs.harvar...JALPO..43a...8D

 

 

Cheers!  Bob F.  smile.gif

I appreciate this thread more than any other on Cloudy Nights and I'm happy to see that we got our own Part 2.  If it wasn't for the discussions and the people that I've enjoyed and learned from here, I'd still be hating the Moon and wondering what all the fuss was with double stars.  I still love deep-sky the best, but I've learned there's a bunch more out there...


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#10 Migwan

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 11:01 AM

I didn't think they allowed that kind of humidity up north - that's only for us poor sods on the Gulf Coast!

 

I just can't say enough good things about the little 120mm Orion.  It shows false color, especially on unfocused bright stars, but it never bothers me.  And it's so easy to use - it's just fun.  I don't ever want to look through an APO (or an ED) to discover how really poor the view is in the achro...

 

That bit of blue in a bright star let's you know to focus a a bit more.  Don't care to pony up for an f5  5" apo, unless it somehow falls right into my lap.  More likely an f5 or faster dob.

 

Forgot to mention that I had the ST80 out for awhile before deciding to pull out the big dogs.  

 

jd 


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#11 aeajr

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 06:32 PM

Aww, I wanted to see the old one tick over 10,000 replies!!

Me too, but apparently if a thread gets big enough the policy is to split it.   I was not aware of this.   

 

This started as my early observation log, when I was a beginner back in 2015 and I invited others to join.   Over time it really has evolved into a community observation log.  So let the observing reports continue to roll and let's share the wonder of the universe. 


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#12 aeajr

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 11:20 PM

Maybe, now that we are in Part 2 my sky will clear up.   Right now the forecast for the next week is clouds, clouds, clouds.


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#13 jklein

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 07:02 AM

Well - I believe you promised clear skies would appear at the 10,000th post........

 

Still - a milestone for this thread to be split. Organic growth.....


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#14 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 12:39 PM

Aug 15-16 

 

Visiting Cape Breton Nova Scotia my wife and I went to hike 6k around Warren lake to try to spot a moose. On the way before 6am we saw a fox and on the S side of the lake got some great photos of a loon close by. We were thrilled to see a bald eagle we must have crept up on fly from its low lakeside perch and pass straight in front of us 100 ft away. It was too quick to photograph and will remain a beautiful memory. We saw some folks across the lake and when we got around to that side the told us they had spotted a moose earlier.  We waited 10 minutes for a possible return with no luck. 

 

The 16th was our last real shot at a sighting so we got up at 4:30a to arrive at the lake by 4:57a sunrise. Getting out to the car the sky was clear with a full moon low to the west. Orion was up with Hyades and Pleaides all competing with the bright moon next to the ocean view a stones throw away. At the lake the moon shone brilliantly over the water and when the trail was lighted enough in the dawn we silently set out the opposite direction from yesterday's hike 2.5k to the cable suspension foot bridge traversing the brook with the moose tracks seen that day. We waited in the quiet for an hour and saw no moose, bear or coyote.  Just bear scat. 

 

It was a wonderful first viewing of the winter constellations and a setting moon into the belt of Venus like sky into the dense forest. Marvellous.


Edited by B l a k S t a r, 19 August 2019 - 12:42 PM.

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#15 JHollJr

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:43 PM

Aug 15-16 

 

Visiting Cape Breton Nova Scotia my wife and I went to hike 6k around Warren lake to try to spot a moose. On the way before 6am we saw a fox and on the S side of the lake got some great photos of a loon close by. We were thrilled to see a bald eagle we must have crept up on fly from its low lakeside perch and pass straight in front of us 100 ft away. It was too quick to photograph and will remain a beautiful memory. We saw some folks across the lake and when we got around to that side the told us they had spotted a moose earlier.  We waited 10 minutes for a possible return with no luck. 

 

The 16th was our last real shot at a sighting so we got up at 4:30a to arrive at the lake by 4:57a sunrise. Getting out to the car the sky was clear with a full moon low to the west. Orion was up with Hyades and Pleaides all competing with the bright moon next to the ocean view a stones throw away. At the lake the moon shone brilliantly over the water and when the trail was lighted enough in the dawn we silently set out the opposite direction from yesterday's hike 2.5k to the cable suspension foot bridge traversing the brook with the moose tracks seen that day. We waited in the quiet for an hour and saw no moose, bear or coyote.  Just bear scat. 

 

It was a wonderful first viewing of the winter constellations and a setting moon into the belt of Venus like sky into the dense forest. Marvellous.

There really ought to be a moose constellation.


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#16 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:44 PM

Called Bulltwinkle. 


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#17 SeaBee1

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:53 PM

There really ought to be a moose constellation.

 

Called Bulltwinkle. 

 

lol.gif  This right here is why this thread is so special...

 

Just sayin'...


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#18 MP173

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 05:09 PM

Any possibility of "pinning" the old thread so it can be readily referenced?  Lots of data and observation logs in that.

 

Absolutely one of the best forums anywhere on any subject.

 

Ed


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#19 Tyson M

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:33 PM

Any possibility of "pinning" the old thread so it can be readily referenced?  Lots of data and observation logs in that.

 

Absolutely one of the best forums anywhere on any subject.

 

Ed

Agreed, that thread is gold.

 

Hopefully with this rehash, more people will join in on the reporting.


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#20 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 07:22 PM

There really ought to be a moose constellation.

 

 

Called Bulltwinkle. 

Well what do you know, I just read a S&T article by Bob King on Orion rising in August and a comment followed pointing to an older article he wrote regarding Native constellations.  There indeed, is a Moose - comprised of what looks to be Pegasus inverted with Cassiopeia making the antlers. Very interesting!

 

https://www.skyandte...aker11122014bk/


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#21 tony_spina

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 09:10 PM

I also vote for pinning the original. I send that to lots of folks. Great reference for newbies and veterans alike 


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#22 BFaucett

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 02:56 AM

Date:  Monday  Aug 19, 2019  |  Time:  approx  2:00 AM – 3:00 AM  CDT
Weather:  Temp 79 F | Humidity 97% | Clear
Scope:  Celestron C90 Mak  (FL = 1250 mm)
Eyepiece(s):  Meade 8-24 mm Zoom
Target:  The Moon  (Waning gibbous - 86%)
Filter(s):  Orion Moon  25% transmission (with and without)
   
   
On this episode of Looney Talk with Lunatic Bob, we’ll be discussing Posidonius and his sidekick Chacornac right here on KNGC 90.1 FM “The Mighty Mak.” grin.gif 
   
Another clear night so I grabbed my C90 Mak and set up on my patio as usual.  After seeing Schroter's Valley a few days ago, I thought I’d try for another sinuous rille.  After doing a little research, Hadley Rille (aka Rima Hadley) in the Apollo 15 landing area seemed like a good one.  I located the area but I was unable to see the rille.  I think I’m gonna need a bigger boat scope to see that one. wink.gif 
  
While looking around the general area, I noticed an interesting looking crater.  I looked it up in my lunar atlas app and it turned out to be Posidonius and I decided to concentrate on it.  I took the scope up to around 100x and I saw an inner wall inside the crater (see #1 in the attached pic).  I could also see a somewhat large crater within Posidonius (see #4).  I also saw the crater within Chacornac (#6).  The longer I looked, I began to notice hints of some other features so I took the mag up to 156x.
  
At 156x, I noticed a smaller crater (#3) within Posidonius below the larger one (#4) and also what appeared to be some peaks (#5) that were lit up like white points in contrast to the dimmer surrounding crater floor.  While studying the crater, I began to see a squiggle (#2) that appeared white against the gray of the crater floor.  It was at the limits of my scope but I could see it.  Could it be another rille?  Well, after doing a little research on the web, it turned out to be the sinuous rille Rimae Posidonius. 
   
Yep, I’d stumbled across another sinuous rille by accident!  I could just barely make it out and it looked like a thin, squiggly line but I saw it.  It was not nearly as prominent as Schroter's Valley had been but then Schroter's Valley is the largest sinuous rille on the Moon.  Still, it was fun just stumbling across something unexpected without having done any research beforehand. 
   
So, that’s it for now.  Just another simple but enjoyable session of observing the Moon. 

  

Cheers and remember to keep looking up!  Bob F. smile.gif 
  

   
Rimae Posidonius  (LRO NASA):

Sinuous rilles are remarkable features resulting from turbulent flow of low viscosity (very fluid), high temperature lavas that erodes the pre-existing surface. In turbulent fluid flows, eddies and vortices form that can be highly erosive and result in the twists and turns seen in many rilles. This rille, located on the western edge of Posidonius crater (~100 km diameter, floor-fractured and partially mare-filled), tightly winds against the northern crater wall and then veers away in a southerly course.

https://www.nasa.gov...2012-rimae.html

  
Posidonius: https://en.wikipedia...donius_(crater)

  
Chacornac: https://en.wikipedia...cornac_(crater)

  

  

Location of Posidonius:

   

gallery_230527_11720_9620.jpg

   

   

The following screenshots are from the “Moon Atlas 3D” app for Android.  https://play.google....onAtlas3D&hl=en

The images are reversed left to right to match the view in my scope.

  

gallery_230527_11720_190537.jpg

  

gallery_230527_11720_215793.jpg


Edited by BFaucett, 20 August 2019 - 03:22 AM.

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#23 aeajr

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:55 AM

Date:  Monday  Aug 19, 2019  |  Time:  approx  2:00 AM – 3:00 AM  CDT
Weather:  Temp 79 F | Humidity 97% | Clear
Scope:  Celestron C90 Mak  (FL = 1250 mm)
Eyepiece(s):  Meade 8-24 mm Zoom
Target:  The Moon  (Waning gibbous - 86%)
Filter(s):  Orion Moon  25% transmission (with and without)
   
   
On this episode of Looney Talk with Lunatic Bob, we’ll be discussing Posidonius and his sidekick Chacornac right here on KNGC 90.1 FM “The Mighty Mak.” grin.gif

   snip...

Oh boy!   I can see this is a show I will want to tune into on a regular basis.  I can't wait for the next episode.  laugh.gif


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#24 SeaBee1

SeaBee1

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 08:21 AM

Oh boy!   I can see this is a show I will want to tune into on a regular basis.  I can't wait for the next episode.  laugh.gif

 

Seconded! Bob does an excellent job of describing his adventures!


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#25 SeaBee1

SeaBee1

    Soyuz

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  • Posts: 3873
  • Joined: 19 Mar 2015
  • Loc: Under the DFW light barrier

Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:04 AM

Time data: 21:00, Monday, 8/19/2019

Instrument: 10 inch reflector, Paradigm 25mm, 12mm, 5mm

Temp data: 92*F, humidity off the chart, dew point - what dew point?

Seeing: avg to poor

Transparency: avg to poor

Targets: Jupiter, Saturn

 

I haven't had "The Monster" out in quite some time, as I have been playing with the new rig lately. It was time, in spite of the poor conditions. We have had out of town family with us for several weeks and finally, yesterday we bid my wife's sister farewell. The house was quiet.

 

It was really an impromptu session, with no clear plan, I just needed a bit of scope time. Jupiter and Saturn seemed like the natural targets, even if the seeing wasn't the best. I put "The Monster" out on the sidewalk with cooling fans blowing, and gathered the other stuff I needed. First up was Jupiter...

 

The obvious first thing I noticed were the moons, only three were visible - Europa, Ganymede, Callisto. Io was behind the planet. The NEB and SEB were well defined in moments of clarity, but the seeing was not the best. Other belts and zones were also visible during moments when the seeing cleared up some, but it never got "good". I was trying real hard to like the view with the 5mm, but it just wasn't happening. The 12mm was the best view and easiest to focus.

 

And then it was time to look at Saturn. The first thing I noticed was that the view of Saturn with the 12mm was much better than the view of Jupiter with the same eyepiece. Cassini was a clearly defined black ring. I could easily see the planetary shadow on the rings themselves. I decided to try the 5mm... and it was a good choice. With more detail evident, I was able to clearly see the cloud belts planetside, Cassini division absolutely popped, but this is where it got interesting... on the outer ring, I could clearly see a distinct color variation in its outer portion, and after a bit of research, possibly the "F" ring? I'm not even sure that is possible with this scope, but I was seeing something I haven't seen before... and then I turned my attention to the planet... and saw another something I haven't seen before... there was a dark coloration at the southern pole, like a grey hole in the otherwise tanish brown cloud cover. Again, I am unsure what exactly I was seeing, as I have never had this kind of detail on Saturn... and I completely forgot to note the moons...

 

At 22:10 and the temp still 90ish, and sweat running off my nose, it was time to reluctantly put things away. Still an enjoyable and much needed hour of eyepiece time.

 

Clear skies guys!

 

CB


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