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#301 aeajr

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:40 AM

Wait till you get the property tax bill.


It might be....



Wait for it....




Wait...



Dramatic pause





Astronomical. 😄
 

#302 viewer

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:00 AM

Wow, is the Head Cheese still active? I have one of those, must be 20 years since I purchased my acre. Haven't actually looked at the "property" since getting a telescope, where can the deed be? If I recall right there were mineral rights too. Anyway it had a nice outfit, you almost believed in it when holding it in your hand.


Edited by viewer, 14 September 2019 - 10:02 AM.

 

#303 aeajr

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:05 AM

I have been meaning to write about Labor Day weekend.  A combination of buyers remorse (despite loving the 102ED), reverse aperture fever, wanting to have bonfires at night and hang out with friends changed how I went about my viewing sessions.  I went for binoculars, my $30 Simmons 10X50, their simplicity was welcoming as I officially started my second year.  

I wasn't concerned with smoke from the fire with these, I fully enjoyed getting up at odd hours of the night, getting different vantage points by walking down the road early in the AM, and could even take the dogs for a walk with me. 

 

I stumbled upon two star clusters which I later identified as M6 and M7.  I would not have seen these if I used my scope or stood by the entrance to the drive.  But by taking a walk and walking around a bend in the road gave me the opportunity.  

Wild Duck Cluster and the Keystone globular, I know now the stars that can take me there.

Kembles cascade, the darkening of the NA nebula, the Double Cluster, the Milky Way, Andromeda and other old favorites.

Ring nebula-  there it is, that point of light. 

 

Waking up early in the AM.  Auriga--M36, M37, M8 along with M45, Orion and it's beautiful star cluster and nebula, Perseus, and the Summer Triangle low in the west.  Summer isn't over yet, I am determined to to enjoy it even more in the next couple weeks.  A different approach was relaxing this time around, I didn't feel like I 'had' to just because I am in dark skies and just purchased a new scope. 

 

For now I want to check out the full moon this weekend and go to Astronomy at the Beach.

A fun thing to do with the Moon is to use a chart that shows where the Apollo landing sites are and identify them with binoculars.   When I view the Moon with binos, that is the first thing I look for.  


 

#304 Tyson M

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:42 AM

Sept 13, 2019

 

Full moon, bad seeing 2/5 transitioning to average seeing 3/5 - mostly clear - mostly transparent - backyard red/white zone-  22:30 to 01:30

 

With my mak cooling in its bag for hours and the moon higher up now clearing my house, I initially set at one part in the yard, to catch a small observing window  until a tree obstructed my view.

 

The views were blinding bright with the 48mm brandon @ 83x mag and 2.4 exit pupil. The seeing wasn't ideal but the Mak was stable and putting up some good views.  This eyepiece is perhaps one of, or my favorite all time eyepiece.  Razor sharp porthole into space, with long focal length scopes.  Can cause blackouts with excessive eye relief but you get use to it.

 

Shortly after, I had to repositioned my EQ mount in the yard to a better location for the duration of the night.  I set up and started looking in detail.

 

I had a brief look at the Ring Nebula.  Despite the light pollution, it looked really good with the 48 Brandon.  Clear sharp grey ring structure apparent. Ghostly and ethereal- cant wait to view this under good conditions at a dark site.

 

Back to the moon.  Bear in mind I spent two hours looking at the disk, 3 hrs total outside  ending at 01:30 but I took a 45 min break to go inside and eat.

 

I usually focusing in on the cratered northern top of the moon.  Pythagoras with its central peak was particularly nice. Carpenter, Philolaus C and Anaxagoras were dominating the view.

 

Another crater that drew me in was Harpalus with its etched rim.  As you get closer in from the lunar disk, contrast seems to drop a bit.  Not much, but the full moon slightly washes out contrast on the face on features I find, with any scope.  That's why I use a 1.25" Lumicon orange filter in smaller scopes.

 

Regardless, my standard for focusing was using Plato and Sinus Iridum.  By 01:00 the seeing was starting to stabilize.  Now we are talking.  Before, after trying the 32, 24, and 16 Brandon's, I found the conditions warranted only the 48.  

 

With the seeing turning into only the slightest of waviness, now the 32 could come out to play and be aesthetically pleasing. Sometimes the 24mm for 166x mag.

 

With the 32 and sometimes the 48, I could see a feature in plato.  I think this is the first for me.  Not sure what it was, when I tried to use a higher power it didnt really support it to well. It might have been craterlets B and C , almost seen as one from this far away. Or, it was craterlet A.

 

I studied the terraced semi-circle rim of Sinus Iridum, moved down to Montes Apenninus.  This feature really deserves a terminator, like in the first quarter phase.  Contrast wasn't jumping out at me, just identification.  Really, the only thing that could have made this night better was being in any phase besides fully illuminated.

 

I did however observe the ray structures for quite some time.  With and without the Lumicon light yellow or the neutral density 25% filters, the ray structures were contrasty and pleasing.  Tyco, Kepler and Copernicus showing off in all their glory.

 

I could see central peaks in 2 out of the 3, none in Keplar. 

 

After this, I packed it and went inside. 

 

Thanks for reading and clear skies!


Edited by Tyson M, 14 September 2019 - 11:46 AM.

 

#305 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:56 AM

Sound's like a great night Ed! I have gone hiking on the trails across the road from there and saw the dome. I never knew what was inside. It sounds like they have a wonderful setup for outreach. Very high Tech.

 

I recently had a birthday and my daughter purchased 1 acre on the moon for me smile.gif. As crazy as it sounds I thought it was sweet she was thinking about my love of the sky. Having the attached deed in hand I thought I should check on the neighborhood while the moon was full. I setup my AT102ED and located it. It's located at the crater Manilius to the west. As soon as I got setup my daughter pulled in the driveway and we checked it out together. It looks like I have property with a nice view of the crater. Something I have always wanted smile.gif

 

It was nice viewing the moon with my daughter. It was easy to see Manilius at 29x & then 44x. It's to the SW of Montes Apenninus which was interesting to view even fully illuminated. We spent some time checking the nearby features and making sure that the lot was buildable and a good investment.

 

After that I felt like I burned a hole in my retina but I swung around to Polaris and split it at 44x. The primary almost looked pink to me and the secondary a deep blue. I'm not sure if my color vision was impaired or enhanced from the moon but I haven't seen the colors looking that rich before. I viewed it at 129x for a closer look but the secondary was fainter the blue color wasn't as intense at that magnification. 

 

Some clouds were passing though so I packed up and we headed in. It was a short session but nice spending a little time viewing the moon with my daughter.

attachicon.gif Moon Deed IMG_6349.jpg

I estimate your future cottage to be around Wilma Flintstone's eye. Use the local regolith to fashion a concrete structure in case of moon quakes and pesky radiation. 


 

#306 TheBigK

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 03:49 PM

You know what the best thing about the full moon is?  Tomorrow it will come up a full hour after the sunset. 

I agree 10000%! I mean, I guess I could embrace the moon and observe it, but I really don't want to.

 

Ed, take it easy and get better quickly! 

 

I got out last night for the first time since last weekend and had a nice double star session (not putting out 4 sessions at once this time). Too bad I tired out so soon. I might possibly go out again tonight as it should be nice and clear.

 

Telescope - Orion XT10i

Finderscope - Stellarvue 50mm, 9x, 5.8 FOV

Eyepieces:

Paracorr Type 2 (used at all times)

ES30mm - 46x, 1.78 FOV

Nagler 12mm, Type 4  - 115x, 0.71 FOV

Zhumell 6mm - 230x, 0.24 FOV

ES4.7mm - 294x, .28 FOV

 

 

Friday, September 13, 2019 8:29-10:54pm
Seeing wasn't all that great compared to normal, so the closest split I made was 1.4". Normally I can get down to 1.0"....but I'm not complaining. I had the moon at my back and kept turning around thinking the neighbor had installed a security light in his backyard!

 

STF2673 (Delphinius)- Viewed at the same time as STF2674. This was the tighter of the 2 pairs since the other pair was greater magnitude difference but quite wide apart.

 

STF2674 (Delphinius) - Viewed with STF2673 in the same field of view using the 4.7 mm.

 

STF2631 (Sagitta) - Nice widish double star. According to SD this is an uncertain double. I use the 12 mm to split this one.

 

STF2583 (Pi Aquilae - Aquila) - This one was a tough split. Fairly high magnitude stars close in brightness, but separated by only 1.4".  Pretty stunning though. According to SD this is an uncertain physical pair. There's another bright star fairly close to it and the same field of view.

 

STF2567 (Aquila) - Easily made out the AB pair with the 12 mm. No way that I can see the C component in my backyard especially right now with moon.

 

STF2184 (Ophiuchus) - I split the AB pair easily enough with both a 12 and the 4.7. But the moon is shining straight behind me so there was no way that I was in a pick up to C component.

 

STFA34 (f Ophiuichi - Ophiuchus) - Took me a couple minutes, but I was able to make out A, B, C and D components. The C and D components are pretty dim tonight.

 

STF2176 (Ophiuchus) - I was surprised that I can actually pick up all 3 components of this system with the 30 mm.  The AC pair is actually a double star named GUI19.

 

STF2170 (Ophiuchus) - The AB pair was actually a pretty nice split in the 12 mm, being 3.3" from each other. The C component was easy to see in all the eyepieces.

 

STF2166 (Ophiuchus) - This is a pretty wide double star system. Easily split in the 12, and I probably could have easily split it with the 30 as well. According to SD this is a physical system, so the 1st physical system for tonight's session!

 

STF2193 (Ophiuchus) - This one was a little tough tonight only because both stars are fairly faint. This and the fact that there is a full moon out tonight so a high sky brightness. According to SD this is an uncertain double.

 

STF2228 (Ophiuchus) - Another physical double according to SD. Both of these stars are 10th magnitude stars, but their separation is quite large so it was much easier to split than the prior pair.

 

STF2230 (Ophiuchus) - A nice non physical triple star. The 3 stars form in right triangle. When I 1st found these 3 stars, I was really hoping that they were a physical star system. That would have been really cool.

 

STF2240 (Ophiuchus) - Another fairly tough pair for tonight due to the sky brightness and how dim these 2 stars are and how close they are to each other. Not a physical system.

 

STF2227 (Ophiuchus) - Quite nice, split easily with a 12. Not a physical system. The stars that are just below it and to the right in my reflector kind of look like a sled to me, like Santa's sleigh sort of.

 

STF2223 (Ophiuchus) - Another physical double. This one was easily split and the 12. This was an easy star hop with the 12 mm from the prior double.

 

STF2216 (Ophiuchus) - This is a physical double in the open cluster IC4665. Even in the 4.7 mm it is the same field of view as STF2212. Spectacular together.

 

STF2212 (Ophiuchus) - Viewed at the same time that I viewed STF2216. Even though this is a much closer double it is not a physical double system. I really thought it would be before I looked it up and SD.

 

STF2200 (Ophiuchus) - Normally this would not be too tough of a split, but tonight it wasn't that easy. I think the seeing is a little worse than normal. Not a physical double.

 

STF2338 (KP Lyrae - Lyra) - I decided to view a few doubles Lyra. For this system I can make out the AB & C components, but no way I can make out the other ones. This is not a physical system. The main is a red? giant star, orange colored.

 

STF2304 (Lyra) - Nice double system, easily split with the 12 mm. According to SD this is a physical system. Main is a nice light orange color. This double makes up the corner "star" of a right triangle.

 

STF2298 (Lyra) - I could only make out the AB pair with the 4.7 mm, I did try with a 12 but wasn't quite able to split it. C component is rather dim tonight but I did make it out.

 

Clear skies!


 

#307 Spacefreak1974

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:15 PM

The Harvest Moon Event at an area park was a great success. We had around 75 people total  tonight  and quite a 10 club attendees with telescopes. Most club attendees also brought family members and guests, so at least 55-60 of the total were attendees other than IAS.

After my presentation inside we looked at the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn along with some brighter star clusters. I was also able to show some folks the Andromeda galaxy. I offered to help them out with future events as well and they all seemed very interested.

 
Great park and location and seeing the big tortoises in the nature center was a treat too. It was great to see so many people from IAS and the community there tonight!
Jon Thomas


 

#308 Studly

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 12:08 AM

The sky cleared (mostly) for a while tonight, so I got out to do some lunar observing:

 

2019-09-14
Time: 22:25 local time (EDT); 02:25 UTC (09-15)
Cloud Cover: None at start, but building to about 10%
Wind: Very Light, increasing to Light
Temperature: Approximately 70F
Overall Seeing: Fair, increasing to Average
Length of Observing Session: 1h 30m
Equipment: Orion 90mm Equatorial Refractor (fl910, f/10.1)

 

Summary: The forecast called for clear skies this evening, but with clouds beginning to build again starting around midnight. I had my doubts about the quality of the atmosphere, mostly due to the rain we had been getting sporadically over the last couple days. There was some barely-perceptible haze in the sky, which the mostly-full Moon highlighted wonderfully. Still, it was a good opportunity to get out with the 90mm achromat to do some lunar observing. I utilized the Meade HD-60 oculars, and used the Orion 13% Neutral Density Filter with most of them.

 

Moon (Waning Gibbous): At about 15 days old, our satellite was just under one day past full. This left a small sliver of shadow in the northeast limb of the visible Moon. I installed the 13% Moon Filter and began my observations. Like last time, I tried to focus my attention on one area—in this case, the area near the Moon’s limb in the vicinity of Mare Crisium, the first to grab my attention. At 25mm, the shadows cast along the northeastern limb were pronounced. Mare Crisium was very clear, a distinct darker stain against the brighter features farther from the terminator. The first smaller feature which drew my attention was crater Condorcet. The crater’s flooded floor stood out well, with the irregular splotch of Mare Undarum nearby. At 18mm, Mare Udarum gained tremendous new detail, showing bright ridges and other minute features along its floor. I spent some time admiring these. Crater Condorcet also gained definition with the increase in magnification, becoming more crisp and better defined. North of Condorcet, craters Hansen and Alhazen were prominent. (As I was admiring this view, the black silhouette of a jet flew directly through my view, leaving its twin contrails in its wake!) At 12mm, more features interior to Mare Undarum became visible, including Fermicus-A and –B. The larger parent crater was also a significant contributor to the view, just outside the Mare itself to the west. Along the terminator itself, lots of deep shadows painted the area richly, but this effect made identification of features difficult for me (as usual so close to the limb). The area around Seneca, Plutarch, Hubble, and Cannon appeared as a jumble of very deep shadows—an awesome view, even as it presented its challenges. I noticed a small, black shadow west of Condorcet—Promontorium Agarum casting a sharp, black shadow at the edge of Mare Crisium. I spent some time admiring this very cool shadow. At 9mm, Promontorium Agarum resolved into a small but very distinct feature. The peak of the cape presented an almost semi-circular rise from which the shadow was cast—very cool. At this magnification a smaller Mare, Anguis, became a distinct and detailed area. On the floor of Mare Crisium, some smaller, lighter-colored dorsa appeared on the verge of being resolved. At 6.5mm, the images in the eyepiece grew larger, but the detail level remained mostly constant. The wind was beginning to pick up slightly, though, just enough to make the scope shake some more. Despite this, I pressed on. North of Mare Crisium, craters Hahn and Berosus appeared very distinctly as a nicely positioned pair. Nearby these, right along the line of the terminator, the area around crater Gauss was swallowed in deep shadows. The wind began to settle back down, and the images were growing steadier once again, so I switched to the 4.5mm ocular, removing the neutral density filter. With the filter removed, the image quality improved despite the increase in magnification. The central prominence of crater Hahn revealed its distinctive almost-triangular shape—very cool. A large area of exceedingly dark shadows drew my attention in the vicinity of Mare Humboldtianum. The way the light was catching the area made it appear as though some central area of the Mare was catching the sunlight, but that deeper areas nearer its edge remained dark. A very strange effect. Along one edge, there appeared to be four small ridges that were creating short, rough sunlit lines, while the surrounding area remained pitch black. Unfortunately, I was not able to positively identify anything in this area due to the distorting effect of the long shadows.

 

Conclusion: Identifying features along the extreme limbs of the Moon remains a serious challenge for me, as tonight’s foray demonstrates. Still, I have had few clear nights to get out under the sky lately, what with the crappy weather and trying to recover from this Bronchitis, so it was very satisfying to get out for this session. Again, the electronic focuser for this scope was put to good use.

 

 

Until next time!


 

#309 NYJohn S

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 07:29 AM

The sky cleared (mostly) for a while tonight, so I got out to do some lunar observing:

 

2019-09-14
Time: 22:25 local time (EDT); 02:25 UTC (09-15)
Cloud Cover: None at start, but building to about 10%
Wind: Very Light, increasing to Light
Temperature: Approximately 70F
Overall Seeing: Fair, increasing to Average
Length of Observing Session: 1h 30m
Equipment: Orion 90mm Equatorial Refractor (fl910, f/10.1)

 

Summary: The forecast called for clear skies this evening, but with clouds beginning to build again starting around midnight. I had my doubts about the quality of the atmosphere, mostly due to the rain we had been getting sporadically over the last couple days. There was some barely-perceptible haze in the sky, which the mostly-full Moon highlighted wonderfully. Still, it was a good opportunity to get out with the 90mm achromat to do some lunar observing. I utilized the Meade HD-60 oculars, and used the Orion 13% Neutral Density Filter with most of them.

 

Moon (Waning Gibbous): At about 15 days old, our satellite was just under one day past full. This left a small sliver of shadow in the northeast limb of the visible Moon. I installed the 13% Moon Filter and began my observations.

                                             

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       -Snip-

Unfortunately, I was not able to positively identify anything in this area due to the distorting effect of the long shadows.

 

Conclusion: Identifying features along the extreme limbs of the Moon remains a serious challenge for me, as tonight’s foray demonstrates. Still, I have had few clear nights to get out under the sky lately, what with the crappy weather and trying to recover from this Bronchitis, so it was very satisfying to get out for this session. Again, the electronic focuser for this scope was put to good use.

Very nice moon session!

 

Does the moon filter help? I have one and haven't used it. During my last session I was really uncomfortable viewing the full Moon with no filter. I may have explored a little more if I used it.

 

I have generally avoided the Moon so I'm not familiar with many of the features. I pulled out my old copy of Turn Left At Orion and there's a large section on viewing the moon with some nice maps. It takes you through each day or phase and has closeup photos of the features with a summary on each. One thing I didn't realize is you can view the same features in reverse during the waning moon but they'll look completely different because the shadows are reversed - east to west. 

 

I didn't see anything in particular that will help with what you're describing, features right on the limb but I thought it was worth mentioning for anyone trying to learn the other features like I am. If nothing else it's a good read when it's overcast.

 

Oh and your mention of the contrails reminded me, I saw a goose fly in front of the moon during my last session. A perfectly sharp little silhouette flapping its wings as it flew by.

 

Clear skies

John


Edited by NYJohn S, 15 September 2019 - 09:53 AM.

 

#310 aeajr

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 07:29 AM

Very nice moon session!

 

Does the moon filter help? I have one and haven't used it. During my last session I was really uncomfortable viewing the full Moon with no filter. I may have explored a little more if I used it.

 

I have generally avoided the Moon so I'm not familiar with many of the features. I pulled out my old copy of Turn Left At Orion and there's a large section on viewing the moon with some nice maps. It takes you through each day or phase and has closeup photos of the features with a summary on each. One thing I didn't realize is you can view the same features in reverse during the waning moon but they'll look completely different because the shadows are reversed - east to west. 

 

I didn't see anything in particular that will help with what you're describing, features right on the limb but I thought it was worth mentioning for anyone trying to learn the other features like I am. If nothing else it's a good read when it's overcast.

 

Oh and your mention of the contrails reminded me, I saw a goose fly in front of the moon during my last session. A perfectly sharp little silhouette flapping its wings as it flew by.

 

Clear skies

John

I have a 25% Moon filter that I use when the Moon gets past 50% illuminated.   I find it make it more comfortable and I also feel it enhances contrast.   I have used it as lesser illumination too, but really value it above 50%.

 

I also use it when viewing Venus.   Helps cut down that glare and lets me better see the phases of the planet. 


 

#311 rajilina

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 09:08 AM

Very nice moon session!
 
Does the moon filter help? I have one and haven't used it. During my last session I was really uncomfortable viewing the full Moon with no filter. I may have explored a little more if I used it.
 
I have generally avoided the Moon so I'm not familiar with many of the features. I pulled out my old copy of Turn Left At Orion and there's a large section on viewing the moon with some nice maps. It takes you through each day or phase and has closeup photos of the features with a summary on each. One thing I didn't realize is you can view the same features in reverse during the waning moon but they'll look completely different because the shadows are reversed - east to west. 
 
I didn't see anything in particular that will help with what you're describing, features right on the limb but I thought it was worth mentioning for anyone trying to learn the other features like I am. If nothing else it's a good read when it's overcast.
 
Oh and your mention of the contrails reminded me, I saw a goose fly in front of the moon during my last session. A perfectly sharp little silhouette flapping its wings as it flew by.
 
Clear skies
John


I got a variable moon filter that I really like. It has a ring you can turn to adjust the strength how you like without having to remove the eyepiece and screw in a different filter. Looking at a really bright moon is a bit painful on the eyes and this filter sure makes it a lot better.

Edited by rajilina, 16 September 2019 - 09:08 AM.

 

#312 The Luckster

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 11:18 AM

It's been sweepy cloudy during the evenings out here, so I've been doing other things...

 

I was a moment away from buying an ES82 18 2", then I had a lucid thought: "What do I really need?"  The actual answer is NOTHING, but I narrowed the need down to a 2" diagonal with twist-locks.  I ordered an Orion 2" Dielectric Twist-Tight diagonal, which also comes with a 1.25" Twist-Tight adapter.

 

I'm really looking forward to not setting screws anymore, but I do hope the diagonal mirror is up to snuff.

 

CS

 

jason


 

#313 Studly

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 12:08 PM

Very nice moon session!

 

Does the moon filter help? I have one and haven't used it. During my last session I was really uncomfortable viewing the full Moon with no filter. I may have explored a little more if I used it.

 

I have generally avoided the Moon so I'm not familiar with many of the features. I pulled out my old copy of Turn Left At Orion and there's a large section on viewing the moon with some nice maps. It takes you through each day or phase and has closeup photos of the features with a summary on each. One thing I didn't realize is you can view the same features in reverse during the waning moon but they'll look completely different because the shadows are reversed - east to west. 

 

I didn't see anything in particular that will help with what you're describing, features right on the limb but I thought it was worth mentioning for anyone trying to learn the other features like I am. If nothing else it's a good read when it's overcast.

 

Oh and your mention of the contrails reminded me, I saw a goose fly in front of the moon during my last session. A perfectly sharp little silhouette flapping its wings as it flew by.

 

Clear skies

John

I actually have two neutral density filters--one a 13% fixed filter, and the other is a variable polarizing filter. They both help tremendously with the glare at lower magnifications. At higher mags, the image is already dimmed due to the ocular, so I find I don't need it. (As demonstrated in my session--I removed the filter when switching to the 4.5mm eyepiece.) I have a co-worker who is just getting into amateur astronomy, and the bright glare from the Moon is one thing she mentions often, so I recommend such a filter. They are inexpensive, and definitely help.

 

I have seen others recommend a color filter on the Moon. This I have not tried, even though I have the filters on-hand. I may give this a shot if the clouds part long enough to do it this week.

 

Generally speaking, I don't actually use filters that often. The 13% Moon filter and the Orion Ultrablock are the ones I reach for first when needed (for Lunar and Nebula viewing, respectively). I just find that they often dim the images too much for my taste on most occasions. Still, when the sky is sufficiently dark, and the target bright enough, they can bring out nuances that would otherwise be missed.

 

For a Moon map, I started out using the Orion Moon Map, but time and again I found myself unable to reconcile what I saw in the eyepiece with what the photographic map was showing. I bit the bullet and bought a copy of Rukl's Atlas of the Moon. This has been tremendously helpful, with its hand-drawn and shaded maps being a better fit for what I am actually seeing. I highly recommend this if you can find one and feel justified spending the money on it. (It was not cheap.) However, when features are nearest the limbs, they are stretched or appear exaggerated in the eyepiece to me, making identification challenging, even with Rukl.

 

But, I do believe I am gaining proficiency in this the more I practice it. With time and patience, this issue should become less pronounced for me .


 

#314 ETXer

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 01:03 PM

Last night was my first night out in a long time, and it shows because I found this "new" thread after trying to find the old one! I'm still on a morning work schedule but now that the sun sets so much earlier, I can do a decent observing session before I have to retire for the evening.

 

Seeing and transparency were average to above average considering the DC suburban sky. I wanted to make up for lost time, so the scope for the evening was the ETX-125AT. The list from Tonightssky.com was nearly excessively long, so I revisited some old favorites as well as some previously-unseen open clusters. I have three eyepieces out with me, but pretty much used the 26mm Plossl exclusively (73x).

 

I started off with M13, M92, M29, C14, and NGC 869/884. M29 was the best of the bunch with many bright stars against a black sky being higher in the sky. M92 showed its characteristic bright core, where M13, was actually somewhat faint and could only resolve fringes after extended viewing. My soon-to-be 11 year-old son came out to see the first group and was awed by M29 and the Double Cluster, and enjoyed M92 in that he could make out some detail. The Owl Cluster was also one of his favorites (as well as mine).

 

Then I began the planned rundown of open clusters, mostly in Cassiopeia.

 

NGC 129 - A nice bright double accompanied by a fairly even distribution of dim stars.

NGC 225 - This turned out to be my favorite, with a small central, even grouping of dim but plainly visible stars that the ETX was able to pull out.

NGC 654 - One bright anchor star with a small tight grouping adjacent.

NGC 7789 - Barely visible, a small patch that if tighter could almost be a globular.

NGC 659 - A very loose grouping of a small number of barely visible stars.

NGC 7039 - In Cygnus, five prominent stars, almost like a big pot with a single-star "handle," accompanied by dimmer background stars.

 

M31 - My first view of the year, faint, fuzzy in the sky glow, but still plainly visible with a bright(er) center.

 

And the finale was M57 which the mighty ETX pulled in nicely. My son was quite impressed and we discussed planetary nebulae.

 

In all, a great night to finally get back into the swing; as autumn progresses, there should be many more opportunities.

 

Cheers, Allan


 

#315 SeaBee1

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:09 AM

It's been sweepy cloudy during the evenings out here, so I've been doing other things...

 

I was a moment away from buying an ES82 18 2", then I had a lucid thought: "What do I really need?"  The actual answer is NOTHING, but I narrowed the need down to a 2" diagonal with twist-locks.  I ordered an Orion 2" Dielectric Twist-Tight diagonal, which also comes with a 1.25" Twist-Tight adapter.

 

I'm really looking forward to not setting screws anymore, but I do hope the diagonal mirror is up to snuff.

 

CS

 

jason

 

Good morning Jason! I am very interested in your impression of this diagonal, I don't like those darn set screws either, but I have been reluctant to spend the money on a new one. So let us know what you think!

 

Clear skies!

 

CB


 

#316 SeaBee1

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:05 AM

Good morning guys!

 

It has been a while since I have had any observing time, so last night was very overdue. It wasn't a long session, but very informative. My log here will be brief, as I will be getting ready for work shortly.

 

9/15/2019
Begin: 19:45
Temp: 91*
RH: 32%
Seeing: 2/5
Transparency: 3/5
Equipment: SW120 ED, AVX GoTo mount, Paradigm 25mm, 12mm, 5mm, and 3.2mm eyepieces. All observations were with the 5mm except where noted. Data points are as listed in SkySafari and SkyTools3.

 

My intent for the session was primarily to check mount operation, as I had performed some work on the RA axis, which had indications of a bind or misadjustment after I did the hyper-tune. I need to fix any problems before my dark site trip next week, and even though I will have tools on hand for any field adjustments necessary, I would rather have any issues corrected now.

With twilight present, I uncovered the SW120/AVX rig, and connected the power and the SkiFi unit. I would be using the TLAO Summer observing list I had downloaded to Sky Safari from SkyTools3. I waited for the sky to darken enough to see a few bright stars for the GoTo alignment. About 20:15 or so, I could see Arcturus and Antares. Jupiter and Saturn were also strutting their stuff. Good enough! Alignment went smoothly and accurately!

 

8 Scorpius - Graffias. As a fairly wide double with a separation of 13.6" between the A and C components and with a primary mag of 2.6 and the C component at 4.9, this one is easy. It is actually a triple, and Sky Tools 3 lists the B component as a mag 10.6 with a separation of only .3", I can say with certainty "It ain't happening!" with the SW120... the A component was a bright white in appearance and the C component was a dull bluish white. I also took note of tracking accuracy - I cannot improve on it! Objects stay precisely in the center of the view!

 

14 Scorpius - Jabbah. This is a near equal mag double with a separation of 1.3", a near perfect "headlight" double, as my oldest granddaughter likes to call them. The A component is 4.1 mag and the B component is mag 5.3. There was another star nearby, and my notes prompt me to research as a possible triple? I'll have to come back to that.

 

HR 5978 - Another double in Scorpius. And, as a bonus, there is another double in the same view. This is another equal mag pair, both around 4 mag, and a separation of 1.1"... easy peasy.

 

HD 144087 - The other double noted in the previous observation. An equal mag pairing with a separation of 11.9". Nothing outstanding except it is a "headlight" double.

 

36 Ophiuchus. This was my favorite for the night! A and B both at 5 mag and 5" of separation... the very definition of "headlight" double. Both a brilliant white, and bright enough to really stand out and at a near perfect separation for the "headlight" effect!

 

M6 - Butterfly Cluster. OK, I'll need to preface this observation with this statement - I am NOT a fan of open clusters. I have tried a few in the past, and I always think - meh... but this one is on the downloaded list, so I thought "Why not?". This one actually looks like the name. The wings were clearly defined and I caught a hint of the antennae... still... meh...

 

M7 - Ptolemy's Cluster. OK, there are a lot of brightish stars to see here at first glance. There is a slightly curved line of bright stars in an upward sweep (eyepiece view), with another curved line below meeting the main line about 2/3 it's length. Interestingly, the longer I looked, the more dim stars began to appear. Still, I am thinking... meh... it's ok, but I remain unimpressed. Is something wrong with me? OK... don't answer that...

 

M13 - Hercules Cluster. We have all heard and many of you have observed this object, perhaps over and over. I have tried in the past with my 10 inch reflector, with no success, but that was probably my inexperience at locating it. When I look up naked eye, there are NO STARS VISIBLE where Hercules should be. However, GoTo put me right on top of it. And I could see it... as a ghost of its (probably) glorious self. It was a fairy wisp, and the promise of magic is there, but the oppressive light pollution (and I am sure the waning gibbous moon) washed the view out to make this one a detection only observation. No stars resolved. I genuinely want to see this one, but from my backyard, the view is unimpressive. I will be looking at this one from the dark site next week. And next week, the moon rise is very late, so I am looking to be impressed. To be continued...

 

M92. Another glob. I was not expecting much after the M13 disappointment. This was to be my last observation for the night, as the helicopter sized Texas mosquitoes were regrouping to carry me away. But this one is bright and full of promise! I could actually resolve a few stars around the (ghostly) core. I spent some time here, and concluded I will be re-visiting this one at the dark site next week.

 

Conclusions: 1.) My light pollution situation would probably be a hobby killer, but I am a stubborn cuss. And there are still lots of things I CAN see and that bring me enjoyment. 2.) GoTo is a darn fine tool in light polluted skies. With an accurate alignment, I no longer doubt if I am on target. If I can't see something, I know it is there behind the LP curtain... 3.) It's a good thing I like looking at double stars... 4.) I don't get out enough!

 

That's all for now my friends! I will post my observations from the dark site trip when I get back. I will be looking at some of the same targets... I think the comparison will be interesting...

 

Keep looking up guys!

 

CB


 

#317 NYJohn S

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 10:44 AM

9-16-19 - 8:30pm-9:30pm - Partially Clear Skies • XT8

 

Clouds were thinning out around sunset so I had it in mind to view a few things that were around Saturn before the moon got too high.

 

Saturn - This looked so good I got stuck here for most of the session. I was able to get a nice crisp view at 218x with contrast and detail that really surprised me. The Cassini division was jet black which made it seem wider than I've seen it in some time. The translucent C ring or Crepe ring was clearly visible and also seemed darker and more noticeable against the planet. The shadow on the rings from the planet was crisp and clear which gave it dimension and an almost 3D look. The banding on Saturn was nicely defined, especially the North Equatorial belt right in the center. The moons were laid out in an interesting configuration. With averted vision I could see Rhea, Dione & Tethys lined up on an angle to the east. Titan was much brighter and further to the SSE. I kept thinking I saw glimpses of Mimas and even Enceladus at but both were very close to the rings which made it difficult to confirm. All in all one of the nicest views I've had of Saturn in some time.

 

NGC 6717 - This is a 9th mag globular not far from Saturn that's just about right on top of Nu2 Sagittarii. It's also very small 5.4 arcmin. I was able to just make it out as very a faint hazy point of light. It reminded me of viewing Mirach's Ghost in the glare of Mirach.

 

Nu1 Sagittarii / Burnham 1033 - At at 218x this was in the same field just to the W of  NGC 6717. This confused me a little because SS shows 2 companions Burnham AB, one 10th Mag and one 11mag plus a 3rd 11.42 mag field star that form a triangle just to the E. I couldn't see any of these. As I was trying to see them I noticed clouds moving in so I'm assuming that was the problem. Still it seems odd I didn't see them at all when I first landed on Nu1 Sagittarii. Sep for the AB pair is listed at 2.5 in SS so I think I should have seen them. I will check again when it's clear. 

 

With the sky to the south clouded over I moved to Vega overhead and managed to quickly split Epsilon1 Lyrae, Epsilon2 Lyrae - Double Double into all 4 components at 218x. It wasn't long before the clouds covered the sky so I packed up. 

 

I had a lot of things on my list like M22 but I got caught up in the beauty of Saturn. I'm glad I spent the time on it I did. It was a memorable view for sure.

 

Clear Skies!

John

 

Edit - I totally forgot I viewed open clusters NGC 6716 & Collinder 394 to the NW of Saturn. Collinder 394 is quite large and both looked like they had potential but were washed out by the time I got to them. A sure sign the transparency was deteriorating. Plus the Moon was above the horizon by then.


Edited by NYJohn S, 17 September 2019 - 12:53 PM.

 

#318 NYJohn S

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:24 AM

CB, I'm looking really forward to your report after the trip. M6, M7, M13 & M92 are all showpiece objects in dark skies. 

 

Glad you got the mount working so well in preparation for the trip so you can enjoy your time there.

 

John


 

#319 Studly

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 11:51 AM

Yay! The weather forecast proved surprisingly WRONG last night, and I was able to get out for another lunar session:

 

2019-09-16
Time: 22:50 local time (EDT); 02:50 UTC (09-17)
Cloud Cover: None at start, but increasing to about 15%
Wind: Moderate, decreasing to Light
Temperature: Approximately 69F
Overall Seeing: Average
Length of Observing Session: 1h 30m
Equipment: Orion 120mm Refractor (fl 600mm, f/5.0)

 

Summary: The forecast proved wonderfully inaccurate, allowing the clouds to part to allow for some lunar observing. My main goal for the evening was to try several different color filters on the Moon, to see if any improved contrast or quality of the views was revealed. Since my start time was a little late, I decided to use the 120mm short-tube refractor for its shorter deployment time. I employed the Vixen SLV eyepieces to obtain the clearest possible reference views, and used the Orion 13% neutral density filter for the low magnification views. Granted, I don’t normally use this scope for lunar observing, but it seemed the best fit for the circumstances.

 

Moon (Waning Gibbous): At 17 days old, the terminator was still fairly near the limb of the Moon, casting long shadows along Mare Crisium, whose edge was very near the dark line. At 25mm (using the 13% NDF), the rim of the Mare was thrown into sharp relief, showing deceptively long shadows that made the rim appear very tall and rough. Crater Macrobius lay nearby, its outer rim very distinct. However, no sign of its central prominence could be made out at this magnification. I did experience some minor issues focusing the image, but with patient manipulation, I was able to obtain good views. At 20mm, the image appeared sharper, and Macrobius showed cleaner lines around its rim. During moments of clear seeing and calm wind, there was just the barest hint of a central prominence—really nothing more than a pinpoint near the center of the crater. At 15mm, the rough terrain around the rim of Mare Crisium was very clear. The uneven floor of the Mare was revealed by a partially-lit interior, now beginning to resolve into detail. Crater Macrobius’ central peak was small but definite. To the northwest of Mare Crisium, the terrain appeared almost pockmarked and very rough. A neat effect! At 12mm, the pockmarked terrain grew more detailed, with the surrounding areas now appearing as almost roughly-wrinkled skin. Other features became clearer and more distinct, as well. Mons Argaeus, situated between Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquilitatis, showed a wealth of detail—many fine ridges and craters, almost piled on top of one another. Back at crater Macrobius, the shadow along its western lip was now more pronounced, creating a nice contrast to the view. At 10mm, Macrobius’ central prominence was still just a tiny point, though easier to see. The uneven floor of Mare Crisium is now resolved to great detail, showing an “L” shape of illuminated area, while the remainder lies in darkness—a very cool effect!

 

Color Filters: At this point, I had the target mostly filling the view in this scope with the 10mm eyepiece, so I removed the 13% NDF and tried my different color filters on the Moon—
#12 Yellow: This filter did seem to improve contrast slightly. The shadows were more prominent, and crater rims were slightly improved. It did seem to mute some of the brighter details, and the image was still bright enough to cause blotchy vision if looking at it too long.
#23 Orange: This filter seemed to highlight brighter areas nicely, but it muted the darker areas. This filter did reduce the glare, making it less painful to look at the bright Moon. The areas around Mons Argaeus were *very* clear with this filter. Crater Posidonius, on the edges of Mare Serenitatis and Lacus Somniorum, was also very clear. The crater’s rim appeared as a fine double line.
#25 Red: This filter dimmed the image considerably. The shadows were made profound, and brighter areas were significantly muted. No glare issues.
#58 Green: This filter still let enough light through to cause my vision to go blotchy, but seemed like an overall decent filter for the target. I noted some very prominent wrinkle ridges in Mare Fecunditatis along the terminator. Overall, the filter seemed to normalize the image slightly, but I did notice the brighter peaks of Montes Appenninus stood out very well.
#80A Blue: This more subtle filter still let a lot of light through, causing blotchy vision if staring too long at the image. This filter emphasized the mountain peaks, but muted the shadows slightly. It provided a surprisingly clear view, nonetheless.
Skyglow: The Orion Skyglow filter was a more subtle filter, and imparted a green tint to the view. It was still very bright, causing blotchy vision if staring at it for too long. It seemed to slightly mute the shadows, but the details of the ejecta rays on the Moon seemed slightly improved.

 

At this point, I removed all filters, and resumed my normal observations. At 9mm, Macrobius’ central prominence was finally revealed clearly! All other previously noted features increased in detail and clarity. (This could partially be due to the removal of the 13% NDF, too.) The uneven floor of Mare Crisium now showed ridges and small interior craters capturing bits of sunlight—very cool! At 6mm, the image began to fade somewhat, but the detail remained clear. Northwest of Mare Crisium, I noted two pairs of craters that captured my attention when moving toward the north lunar pole. The first in line were craters Franklin and Cepheus. Cepheus-A was clear, a smaller crater interrupting its parent’s rim. Franklin showed a strong central peak. A very nice pair to look at. Continuing northwest, craters Hercules and Atlas formed another significant pair. Atlas showed a small but distinct central feature, while Hercules proudly showed its interior crater. At 5mm, the detail in the view improved again. Northeast of crater Atlas, a bright peak was noted winking from within the darkness of the terminator. Following the terminator from here toward the north polar region, I spotted at least two more of these—now all very distinct at this high magnification. They gave me the impression of glowing teeth peering out of the shadow! Moving back to Mare Crisium, the detail in and around the area was breathtaking. The play of light and shadow on the interior, partially-lit features at times seemed to resemble a stair step pattern. Very cool! At 4mm, the internal reflections in the eyepiece began to interfere with the view somewhat. (This is a known issue with the Vixen SLV line.) However, the detail levels remained good. Pushing my luck, I decided to go for broke with the 2.5mm ocular. The image was shimmering noticeably at this magnification, but some additional details could be picked out of the view during moments of steady viewing. The central features of crater Atlas resolved into a line of small ridges or peaks. Crater Macrobius’ central prominence gained some definite shape. The wrinkle ridges along the terminator in Mare Fecunditatis revealed *remarkable* textures.

 

Conclusion: I would have actually liked to stay out longer, but with work looming large in the morning, I had to call it at this point. It was interesting to test the different filters and gauge their effects. I’m not sure I will use them very often, and I’m sure every person would get different impressions from them since it is a very subjective thing, but it was interesting to test them. I can see the #12 Yellow and #58 Green ones being the most useful out of the ones tested.

 

 

Until next time!


 

#320 SeaBee1

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 12:50 PM

CB, I'm looking really forward to your report after the trip. M6, M7, M13 & M92 are all showpiece objects in dark skies. 

 

Glad you got the mount working so well in preparation for the trip so you can enjoy your time there.

 

John

 

John, I am really looking forward to going there! My only fear is that it will be a total bummer... when I return home lol.gif

 

Clear skies sir!

 

CB


 

#321 SeaBee1

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 12:53 PM

Yay! The weather forecast proved surprisingly WRONG last night, and I was able to get out for another lunar session:

 

2019-09-16
Time: 22:50 local time (EDT); 02:50 UTC (09-17)
Cloud Cover: None at start, but increasing to about 15%
Wind: Moderate, decreasing to Light
Temperature: Approximately 69F
Overall Seeing: Average
Length of Observing Session: 1h 30m
Equipment: Orion 120mm Refractor (fl 600mm, f/5.0)

 

Summary: The forecast proved wonderfully inaccurate, allowing the clouds to part to allow for some lunar observing. My main goal for the evening was to try several different color filters on the Moon, to see if any improved contrast or quality of the views was revealed. Since my start time was a little late, I decided to use the 120mm short-tube refractor for its shorter deployment time. I employed the Vixen SLV eyepieces to obtain the clearest possible reference views, and used the Orion 13% neutral density filter for the low magnification views. Granted, I don’t normally use this scope for lunar observing, but it seemed the best fit for the circumstances.

 

Moon (Waning Gibbous): At 17 days old, the terminator was still fairly near the limb of the Moon, casting long shadows along Mare Crisium, whose edge was very near the dark line. At 25mm (using the 13% NDF), the rim of the Mare was thrown into sharp relief, showing deceptively long shadows that made the rim appear very tall and rough. Crater Macrobius lay nearby, its outer rim very distinct. However, no sign of its central prominence could be made out at this magnification. I did experience some minor issues focusing the image, but with patient manipulation, I was able to obtain good views. At 20mm, the image appeared sharper, and Macrobius showed cleaner lines around its rim. During moments of clear seeing and calm wind, there was just the barest hint of a central prominence—really nothing more than a pinpoint near the center of the crater. At 15mm, the rough terrain around the rim of Mare Crisium was very clear. The uneven floor of the Mare was revealed by a partially-lit interior, now beginning to resolve into detail. Crater Macrobius’ central peak was small but definite. To the northwest of Mare Crisium, the terrain appeared almost pockmarked and very rough. A neat effect! At 12mm, the pockmarked terrain grew more detailed, with the surrounding areas now appearing as almost roughly-wrinkled skin. Other features became clearer and more distinct, as well. Mons Argaeus, situated between Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquilitatis, showed a wealth of detail—many fine ridges and craters, almost piled on top of one another. Back at crater Macrobius, the shadow along its western lip was now more pronounced, creating a nice contrast to the view. At 10mm, Macrobius’ central prominence was still just a tiny point, though easier to see. The uneven floor of Mare Crisium is now resolved to great detail, showing an “L” shape of illuminated area, while the remainder lies in darkness—a very cool effect!

 

Color Filters: At this point, I had the target mostly filling the view in this scope with the 10mm eyepiece, so I removed the 13% NDF and tried my different color filters on the Moon—
#12 Yellow: This filter did seem to improve contrast slightly. The shadows were more prominent, and crater rims were slightly improved. It did seem to mute some of the brighter details, and the image was still bright enough to cause blotchy vision if looking at it too long.
#23 Orange: This filter seemed to highlight brighter areas nicely, but it muted the darker areas. This filter did reduce the glare, making it less painful to look at the bright Moon. The areas around Mons Argaeus were *very* clear with this filter. Crater Posidonius, on the edges of Mare Serenitatis and Lacus Somniorum, was also very clear. The crater’s rim appeared as a fine double line.
#25 Red: This filter dimmed the image considerably. The shadows were made profound, and brighter areas were significantly muted. No glare issues.
#58 Green: This filter still let enough light through to cause my vision to go blotchy, but seemed like an overall decent filter for the target. I noted some very prominent wrinkle ridges in Mare Fecunditatis along the terminator. Overall, the filter seemed to normalize the image slightly, but I did notice the brighter peaks of Montes Appenninus stood out very well.
#80A Blue: This more subtle filter still let a lot of light through, causing blotchy vision if staring too long at the image. This filter emphasized the mountain peaks, but muted the shadows slightly. It provided a surprisingly clear view, nonetheless.
Skyglow: The Orion Skyglow filter was a more subtle filter, and imparted a green tint to the view. It was still very bright, causing blotchy vision if staring at it for too long. It seemed to slightly mute the shadows, but the details of the ejecta rays on the Moon seemed slightly improved.

 

At this point, I removed all filters, and resumed my normal observations. At 9mm, Macrobius’ central prominence was finally revealed clearly! All other previously noted features increased in detail and clarity. (This could partially be due to the removal of the 13% NDF, too.) The uneven floor of Mare Crisium now showed ridges and small interior craters capturing bits of sunlight—very cool! At 6mm, the image began to fade somewhat, but the detail remained clear. Northwest of Mare Crisium, I noted two pairs of craters that captured my attention when moving toward the north lunar pole. The first in line were craters Franklin and Cepheus. Cepheus-A was clear, a smaller crater interrupting its parent’s rim. Franklin showed a strong central peak. A very nice pair to look at. Continuing northwest, craters Hercules and Atlas formed another significant pair. Atlas showed a small but distinct central feature, while Hercules proudly showed its interior crater. At 5mm, the detail in the view improved again. Northeast of crater Atlas, a bright peak was noted winking from within the darkness of the terminator. Following the terminator from here toward the north polar region, I spotted at least two more of these—now all very distinct at this high magnification. They gave me the impression of glowing teeth peering out of the shadow! Moving back to Mare Crisium, the detail in and around the area was breathtaking. The play of light and shadow on the interior, partially-lit features at times seemed to resemble a stair step pattern. Very cool! At 4mm, the internal reflections in the eyepiece began to interfere with the view somewhat. (This is a known issue with the Vixen SLV line.) However, the detail levels remained good. Pushing my luck, I decided to go for broke with the 2.5mm ocular. The image was shimmering noticeably at this magnification, but some additional details could be picked out of the view during moments of steady viewing. The central features of crater Atlas resolved into a line of small ridges or peaks. Crater Macrobius’ central prominence gained some definite shape. The wrinkle ridges along the terminator in Mare Fecunditatis revealed *remarkable* textures.

 

Conclusion: I would have actually liked to stay out longer, but with work looming large in the morning, I had to call it at this point. It was interesting to test the different filters and gauge their effects. I’m not sure I will use them very often, and I’m sure every person would get different impressions from them since it is a very subjective thing, but it was interesting to test them. I can see the #12 Yellow and #58 Green ones being the most useful out of the ones tested.

 

 

Until next time!

 

Very nice detailed report, Tony! I have used filters on planet observations but not on the moon (except for a NDF)... I'll have to try this out the next time I do some moon observing.

 

Keep looking up!

 

CB


 

#322 ETXer

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 03:32 PM

Conclusions: 1.) My light pollution situation would probably be a hobby killer, but I am a stubborn cuss. And there are still lots of things I CAN see and that bring me enjoyment. 2.) GoTo is a darn fine tool in light polluted skies. With an accurate alignment, I no longer doubt if I am on target. If I can't see something, I know it is there behind the LP curtain... 3.) It's a good thing I like looking at double stars... 4.) I don't get out enough!

That makes two of us CB!

 

I must confess, my ETXs get used used most of the time with my smaller scopes' setting circles making up the difference. My C8 Deluxe has DSCs which also help me make the most out of my limited available observing time.

 

But every time I go out in my light-polluted suburban skies, I'm surprised nearly every time at how much I can still see with my small to medium sized scopes. That's what keeps me going!

 

P.S. It also helps that the Moon is becoming one of my favorite observing targets and I'm sure will become more so over time.

 

Cheers, Allan


 

#323 Migwan

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 05:03 PM

9/16/19  21:15 to 22:00  Transparency 2 Seeing 3  

 

Checked Jupiter and could see GRS coming round the bend.  Hit 61 Cyg, Albireo, Epsilon Lyre, Epsilon Pegasi, Gamma Arietis, Eta and Sigma Cass, and Zeta Aquarius.    Was unable to split Gamma Arietis and was on it when the clouds returned.   Still, happy to get out after yet another long period of rain and clouds.snoopy2.gif

 

jd


 

#324 The Luckster

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:02 PM

Good morning Jason! I am very interested in your impression of this diagonal, I don't like those darn set screws either, but I have been reluctant to spend the money on a new one. So let us know what you think!

 

Clear skies!

 

CB

 

Copy that, CB.

 

 

 

Tried measuring my entrance pupil using the hex wrench method, just so I have an idea what I'm dealing with from my observatory, er, balcony.  Also trying to figure out the mechanics of these little tests, too.

 

This was before moon rise; I came up with 4mm entrance pupil for my dominant (left eye), and 5mm for my passive (right eye).  I may need to swap which eye I use for observing, and of course to perform side-by-side peeper comparisons...

 

CS

 

jason


 

#325 Migwan

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  • Loc: Meeechigan

Posted 17 September 2019 - 09:32 PM

9/7/19  Looked out of the upstairs window and lots of stars.   Out at 9PM to find a low level fog to about 12 feet.  Really?  Wasn't predicted till 1AM.   Guess there is a new player in town.  Bummer.  jd


 


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