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#376 NYJohn S

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 09:40 AM

Ed, I use this Red Dot - https://www.highpoin...r-by-high-point

 

I used it last night to set up on and track ISS so I think works well. I even changed eyepieces halfway through the pass from a 2" 38mm to a 1-1/4" 24mm and was able to get right back on it. 

 

For regular star hopping it gets me to the first star and I star hop through the eyepiece. The only thing I don't like about it is it requires an allen key to adjust. On my dob I have a simple Orion Red Dot that has knobs. That's much easier then fiddling with an allen key in the dark. I will say the adjustments seems to hold even when I remove the finder for travel. I may try swapping it out with the Baader Sky Surfer III - https://agenaastro.c...dot-finder.html I've heard good things about it.

 

I used this base to mount it - https://www.ebay.com...3AAAOSwXaRaBrRh

 

I thought about a laser but there are too many planes here plus I would worry about inadvertently shining it in a neighbors window. I observe just over 1 house for views to the south. 

 

AT102ED with HP 2" Diagonal

 


 

#377 aeajr

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 10:15 AM

NYJohn,

 

Was I reading that Baader finder properly?  Is this a red dot with a 30 mm magnifying optic?


 

#378 CosmoNewt

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 10:18 AM

Some notes to share from Labor day weekend.

SkyScanner 100 on my Twilight1 mount.  Definitely the best thing that happened for this scope.  Better that two milk crates stacked onto a outdoor coffee table.  No more shakes at 45X (9mm plossl).   I was surprised at how well I could see the Ring Nebula, at 45X you could discern the ring structure.

10X50 binoculars-  Starting at Altair and about 12 degrees east brings you to three open clusters, I4756, NGC 6633, and I4665.  All are about magnitude 4.5.  There are some of my first dedicated binocular targets.  

 

Last night was the first time I observed in a couple weeks.  At home in the 'burbs with Bortle 6 skies.  

AT 102ED with BH zoom with 2.25X barlow.  This allowed me to push this to roughly over 200X.  Jupiter and Saturn were the first two objects for this evening session.

Jupiter-  Banding pattern was quite clear along with 3 of its moons.  However in the northern most prominent band had a circular region.  Either this is many of Jupiter's storms or maybe a moon transit.  However it wasn't very dark and I couldn't find too much information about Jupiter's other storms.  

Saturn-  Cassini Division was obvious, this is the first time I have been able to see it in this much detail.  I also saw a banding pattern in the mid-northerly area.  

This refractor has really surprised me on the planets.  Definitely need to pursue Mars, Neptune and the moon.

 

Dark Skies have spoiled me..  My next target was M11, the wild duck cluster.  Starting at Altair I star hopped identifying the brighter stars of Aquila.  Going north brought me to the Coathanger asterism, while going south brought me  to Altair lambda and eventually to Scutum beta.  The hook/arc of 5-6 stars that these two belong to are the giveaway and lead you to M11.  I found it but geez it took me some time.  Light pollution stinks and I need to make an effort to get to my state park 5 miles away to Bortle 4 on a more consistent basis.   

I am getting a better feel for this new telescope, I need to relocate my RQF as I don't like my initial placement.  

Overall a nice session. I want to set up early in the morning before work to check out Orion and the Pleiades. 


 

#379 NYJohn S

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 10:32 AM

NYJohn,

 

Was I reading that Baader finder properly?  Is this a red dot with a 30 mm magnifying optic?

Ed, I think it has a 30mm aperture but doesn't magnify. From what I've read it dims down nicely which is a problem with a lot of them. They're so bright they block the star you're trying to see. I think Marty mentioned using a small blue gel over where it projects to get his dimmer. I keep leaving mine on so the battery gets weak. It seems pretty good now but it will probably die on me now that I got it just right smile.gif


Edited by NYJohn S, 21 September 2019 - 10:40 AM.

 

#380 MP173

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 11:20 AM

NYJohn - thanks for the tip on a finder.  Once again, your photography is outstanding.

 

CosmoNewt - another happy AT102ED user!  The scope is much more than expected.  Saturn / Cassini was the best I have seen last night.  Not sure why, but I will take it.  Now I have a reference to go by.

 

Agree with the Wild Duck M11.  The light pollution is a killer.  I found ramping up the power seemed to work once, making the background darker and bringing out the 11th mag and dimmer stars.

 

Give Almaak in Andromeda a look.  The colors in the AT are brilliant.  Rivals Alberio, in my opinion.

 

edit....one more thing.  If you go back to M11 and use the arc of 5 or 6 stars to locate it, make a short detour from Lambda Aquilla ( first of the arc stars) to view sh 286 which is only 1 degree to the north.  Check out the purple hue of the companion.

 

Ed


Edited by MP173, 21 September 2019 - 11:24 AM.

 

#381 TheBigK

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 12:30 PM

Snip 

 

A finderscope is going to be needed to view darker regions of the sky.... I struggled twice with finding objects.  Great night even with the challenges.

 

Now, it is time to go harvest my sweet potato crop.

 

Ed

Ed, I upgraded my finder from an old Orion (that just didn't seem to work...optics were dirty inside after storing the scope for a few years) to a Stellarvue 50mm finder and it was a game changer for star hopping. I was using my ES30 which gave me about a 2 degree FOV without the Paracorr. The SV50 gives me a 5.8 degree FOV at 9x. So much easier star hopping now. Complete game changer. I use this along with a Telrad. Find my nearest visible star with the Telrad (which I can only see down to 3.5-4.0 mag near zenith), then use the finder to get close, then my 30mm if needed, although a lot of times I can get right on the double I'm hopping to with the 12mm (.71 FOV) and even the 4.7mm (.28 FOV) with just the finder.

 

Clear skies!


Edited by TheBigK, 21 September 2019 - 12:33 PM.

 

#382 CosmoNewt

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 12:59 PM

NYJohn - thanks for the tip on a finder.  Once again, your photography is outstanding.

 

CosmoNewt - another happy AT102ED user!  The scope is much more than expected.  Saturn / Cassini was the best I have seen last night.  Not sure why, but I will take it.  Now I have a reference to go by.

 

Agree with the Wild Duck M11.  The light pollution is a killer.  I found ramping up the power seemed to work once, making the background darker and bringing out the 11th mag and dimmer stars.

 

Give Almaak in Andromeda a look.  The colors in the AT are brilliant.  Rivals Alberio, in my opinion.

 

edit....one more thing.  If you go back to M11 and use the arc of 5 or 6 stars to locate it, make a short detour from Lambda Aquilla ( first of the arc stars) to view sh 286 which is only 1 degree to the north.  Check out the purple hue of the companion.

 

Ed

Ed,

Thanks for the suggestions.  I have made note of Almaak ( gamma Andromeda).   I am always interested in colorful double/ multi stars and is something I want to explore next along with asterisms, and getting  a better understanding of celestial coordinates of first magnitude stars.    Andromeda/Pegasus/Triangulum is an area that I am planning on looking at next time when conditions are right.  


 

#383 nva

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 01:43 PM

Was out 9/20 after dark to just after moonrise. Had the 16 inch out with newly cleaned and hotspotted mirror, collimation is almost....fun...with the catseye tools and hotspot.

 

I generally stick with the planets because the light pollution is so bad but tonight I just did deep sky objects and stars, for example Polaris was barely visible naked eye last night (Polaris B being nicely visible in the scope).

 

Started with ring and dumbbell @ 100x, dumbbell was a smudge and ring was apparent with both averted and direct vision.

 

Threw on the lumicon UHC and they were honestly striking, amazing at 100x (4mm exit pupil) (looked like the pictures!), sadly I only have a 2 inch filter and could not add any more magnification while using the filter (my DOB's focuser is threaded but its larger than 2 inches).

 

I cranked up m2 and m15 to 200-400 going from a fuzzy glob to filling the eyepiece with an innumerable number of stars was quite the experience.

 

I didn't take any notes hit up some other NGC globs and clusters and called it a night before the dew became a problem. 

 

Double double was a little unforgiving last night both pairs weren't well split until 200's.


Edited by nva, 22 September 2019 - 10:22 AM.

 

#384 Migwan

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:17 PM

Three night log.  First two, one hour each due to clouds rolling in.  Decided to work on my knowledge of constellations and utilized “Constellations” in CPC’s menu to identify targets.  Visited Named Stars, Double Stars, Named Objects, Messier & NGC objects in each constellation. 

 

9/17 & 19/19,   60s°,  RH 60-70%   Trans 2, See 3,  9:15 PM to 10:15 PM both nights. 

 

Cygnus;  Deneb, Sadr, 17Cyg (pale yellow, small red), M29 (cluster, look likes a  butterfly), M39 (bright cluster),  NGC6764  Galaxy (unable to see),  Cocoon Nebula (unable to see), Crescent Nebula (mostly visible.  Veil Nebula (full east quite visible, west not so much), A number of other target were available but other than clusters, mags too low for conditions.

 

Cephius; Alderamin, Alrai, Alfirk, (blue white with small red), Kurah (blue white with small red)  Delta  Cep (white with medium blue),  NGC40 (planetary nebula, bright central star, dim bluish rim, great target, can just see in ST120),  NGC188 (loose feint cluster), NGC (number of low mag galaxies, not attempted).

 

Cass; Archid (white with medium orange, possibly a multiple) Caph, Navi, Rukbah, Schedar (white with small yellow) Segan, Eta Cass (white with yellow) Sigma Cass (white with blue, close double), M52 (almost a glob) M103 (cluster, triangular) , Clouds.

 

Best target; NGC40,  at first looked circular, but with further viewing becomes a pair of crisp parentheses accenting the bright easily seen central star.   Surprising amount of color on these. Not sure if it was seeing or the mind, but its interesting how the parentheses faked me out to at first look like a perfect circle.  

 

9/20/19; 60s, RH 60-70%, Trans 3, See 4,  9:15 PM – 12:30 AM

 

Hercules; Cujam, Kornephoros, Maasym (2 yellow mid sized), Rusalgethi (white with small white), Sarin (white with small red), 95Her (two mid sized white), M13, M92.

 

Draco; Alsaphl,  Altais,  Arrakis (2 mid sized white, close), Dziban (medium white with small red, spread), Edasich

Note; Conditions worsened during Draco an Hercules and then improved dramatically here.

 

Aquila; Alshain, Altair, Terazed, NGC6709,35 &38 (open clusters), NGC6741 (plan neb, small trapizoid, fairly bright for small size,  visible in ST120, max mag 666x thru barlowed morpheus 9mm), NGC6749 (medium size glob, stars resolved at 136x, quite visible in ST120), NGC6751 (plan neb, kind of small, feint, max usable mag 230x), NGC6756 & 60 (open clusters, first feint, 2nd moderate), NGC6772 (plan neb, very small and difficult to find, found at 176x, barely, gone at 230x) NGC6778 (plan neb, a smidge broader than 6772, very feint, same on mags) NGC6790 (plan neb, unable to see), NGC6803 (plan neb, another very small feint target, seen at 333x)  

 

Note; Three of these planetary nebula were a real challenge.  Had to stretch them out with high mags to differentiate from stars.

 

Cats Eye:  Central star quite visible.  Felt I could see some nebulosity outside the usual confines of this planetary nebula with averted vision.   Able to stretch mag to 666x, but best at 333x.

 

Ring;  Central star via averted vision for 4 or five seconds at a time.  Was able to repeat with both eyes.  Was getting lower and mag would only carry to 333x overall.  Happy to add this dwarf to the list.  Yea!

 

jd


Edited by Migwan, 21 September 2019 - 03:18 PM.

 

#385 Tyson M

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 08:51 PM

I was using a C14. I thought it would do well with Neptune and it did. After reading Tyson's post about using an 8 inch mak I feel a little bit silly about not looking for Neptune in my smaller scopes when I didn't have my big scope.

Your C14 was MADE for Uranus and Neptune. Try to catch that dusk (or dawn) seeing. 


 

#386 Tyson M

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 08:56 PM

Three night log.  First two, one hour each due to clouds rolling in.  Decided to work on my knowledge of constellations and utilized “Constellations” in CPC’s menu to identify targets.  Visited Named Stars, Double Stars, Named Objects, Messier & NGC objects in each constellation. 

 

9/17 & 19/19,   60s°,  RH 60-70%   Trans 2, See 3,  9:15 PM to 10:15 PM both nights. 

 

Cygnus;  Deneb, Sadr, 17Cyg (pale yellow, small red), M29 (cluster, look likes a  butterfly), M39 (bright cluster),  NGC6764  Galaxy (unable to see),  Cocoon Nebula (unable to see), Crescent Nebula (mostly visible.  Veil Nebula (full east quite visible, west not so much), A number of other target were available but other than clusters, mags too low for conditions.

 

Cephius; Alderamin, Alrai, Alfirk, (blue white with small red), Kurah (blue white with small red)  Delta  Cep (white with medium blue),  NGC40 (planetary nebula, bright central star, dim bluish rim, great target, can just see in ST120),  NGC188 (loose feint cluster), NGC (number of low mag galaxies, not attempted).

 

Cass; Archid (white with medium orange, possibly a multiple) Caph, Navi, Rukbah, Schedar (white with small yellow) Segan, Eta Cass (white with yellow) Sigma Cass (white with blue, close double), M52 (almost a glob) M103 (cluster, triangular) , Clouds.

 

Best target; NGC40,  at first looked circular, but with further viewing becomes a pair of crisp parentheses accenting the bright easily seen central star.   Surprising amount of color on these. Not sure if it was seeing or the mind, but its interesting how the parentheses faked me out to at first look like a perfect circle.  

 

9/20/19; 60s, RH 60-70%, Trans 3, See 4,  9:15 PM – 12:30 AM

 

Hercules; Cujam, Kornephoros, Maasym (2 yellow mid sized), Rusalgethi (white with small white), Sarin (white with small red), 95Her (two mid sized white), M13, M92.

 

Draco; Alsaphl,  Altais,  Arrakis (2 mid sized white, close), Dziban (medium white with small red, spread), Edasich

Note; Conditions worsened during Draco an Hercules and then improved dramatically here.

 

Aquila; Alshain, Altair, Terazed, NGC6709,35 &38 (open clusters), NGC6741 (plan neb, small trapizoid, fairly bright for small size,  visible in ST120, max mag 666x thru barlowed morpheus 9mm), NGC6749 (medium size glob, stars resolved at 136x, quite visible in ST120), NGC6751 (plan neb, kind of small, feint, max usable mag 230x), NGC6756 & 60 (open clusters, first feint, 2nd moderate), NGC6772 (plan neb, very small and difficult to find, found at 176x, barely, gone at 230x) NGC6778 (plan neb, a smidge broader than 6772, very feint, same on mags) NGC6790 (plan neb, unable to see), NGC6803 (plan neb, another very small feint target, seen at 333x)  

 

Note; Three of these planetary nebula were a real challenge.  Had to stretch them out with high mags to differentiate from stars.

 

Cats Eye:  Central star quite visible.  Felt I could see some nebulosity outside the usual confines of this planetary nebula with averted vision.   Able to stretch mag to 666x, but best at 333x.

 

Ring;  Central star via averted vision for 4 or five seconds at a time.  Was able to repeat with both eyes.  Was getting lower and mag would only carry to 333x overall.  Happy to add this dwarf to the list.  Yea!

 

jd

I love 17 Cygni, one of my fav double stars.   I am hoping to catch Archid next outing with my mak.  Shouldve tried last night but didnt think of it.


 

#387 Tyson M

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 09:23 PM

Sept 20, 2019 - dark yellow zone dark site. Clear skies, average to good transperency, good and at times, poor seeing.

 

Canon 10x42L IS(first light), 8" Mak Cass, EQ6, 76mm refractor

 

With my new Canon 10x42L IS WP's - session from approx 21:30 to 22:30

 

I have been very excited about these binoculars.  I have used them in the daytime and that's where image stabilization truly shines.  It seems that shakes are harder to stabilize when looking horizontally, as I have learned to reduce the shakes looking up higher in the sky. So for birding, these are already a win.  I am used to using Pentax12x50 and it takes a bit of work to stabilize the view, usually by bracing my elbows on something and holding by the objectives.  With IS, I don't need to do any of that.

 

Nonetheless, I was eager to try these out at night time for astronomy and was not disappointed, as Image stabilization again is a boon.  It will make it easier to split double stars that are within range of the binos, and focus on the details rather than reducing the shakes.   The shakes are not completely gone - but reduced.

 

The milky way was sprawling across the sky.  I couldnt get over how nice it looked.  I was getting good transperency at 21:30. 

 

I focused first on the targets leaving the sky early- Sagittarius.  I found M8, M20, M24 which looked very good.  Hopped up found M16 and M17.  These are bright and easy pickings with the bins. There were some star clusters here but too but I didn't identify them. I also travelled up and found M11, and the coathanger.  The field on these are flat!  

 

I travelled to Hercules, found M13 and M92.  

 

I really tried hard for the Veil nebula, and around Cygnus for any nebula but no luck.  Hundreds of stars though, and with the milky way very defined the view blew me away nonetheless.  I actually get lost in this area and don't try to identify anything as it is too crowed to do anything but just admire. Eventually I will start learning Cygnus more, besides the brightest stars.

 

I observed M31.  I could see it's massive shape.  Approx 2.5 degrees across. One of my better views of this galaxy ever with any instrument.  But the transparency was fairly good. Similar to my previously owned NP127 with 31 nagler.

 

With that in mind, I hopped down to M33.  I was able to find it fairly easy.  Still very faint, no galaxy details visible. Probably my best view of this to date, as normally it is hard to pick out even at my dark site.

 

Melotte 20 was fantastic, like usual.  One of the best binocular sights.  These binos are similar to the fujinon 10x50 with fov and field flatness, and image sharpness, except these are much lighter and have image stabilization!  Can you tell that I like these binoculars?

 

I hopped to the double cluster.  The two leading "arms" of stars going into the double cluster remind me of the ends of spiral or barred spiral galaxy leading into the dense double nuclei.  Stock 2 up a head looking fantastic as well, with its diffuse cloud of stars above.

 

I found M103 in Cass.  I tried to spot some nebula around here (like pacman) but no luck.  

 

M45 was rising, so with my naked eye I wanted to judge transparency.  I could intermediately see one brighter star, but with careful scrutiny I could see 3 other fainter members.  4 members via naked eye!  Using the Canon's I got the rest of those blue jewels, which are the 8 brightest members, and the Alcycone's chain of stars leading towards it.  With the 76mm refractor I observed this closer up as well, with the 24 and 32 Brandon's to frame the cluster and observe the triangle of stars inside it.  I found this pic online to show you Alcyone A, with the triangle B, D, and C.   Also one of my M45 favorite views is Ally's Braid, the chain of stars leading to Alcyone A.

 

 alcyone1.jpg  Allys Braid - 2.jpg

 

I tried for some galaxies in Ursa Major but it was super low and in the muck.  No luck with M51 or M101. 

 

All in all, I am very impressed and these binos are going to get a lot of use.

 

After that, I put away the binos and started using the scopes more.  My friend came out for the first time to join me in the night sky and look through my telescopes. He is going to get into the hobby so I am encouraging him to get a dob off kijiji here locally.  Going to start him off with a set of starter eyepieces.

 

 

With the refractor and the mak, I checked out much of the same. Before I set up the mak and aligned the mount, I caught Saturn with the 76 refractor.  Using the 2.5 powermate with the 11 delite I got a nice view.  No cassini division, barely if any hint of hemisphere discoloration.  Still looked nice despite the seeing and observing it in the muck.  I also checked out M24 with the refractor.  At low power it almost looks like Melotte 20 does in the binoculars, similar shape. 

 

M11 with the 11 delite in the refractor to frame it well.  And then with the 48mm brandon, 32mm and 24mm in the 8" Mak.  The 24mm was a bit too high of power for the conditions.   It does look like a flock of birds taking off from a lake.   One of my favorite targets.

 

M13 and M92 in the Mak looked very good.  I was seeing more stars out here but my last in town session with good seeing at dusk seemed better!  Never thought I'd say that, as it has not happened before.  I will need a night of good seeing AT the dark site to really get blown away.  The 48 brandon looked great, super bright cluster just barely being resolved in individual stars (brightest members only), and it could handle up to 24mm but I found the best view between the 32mm and the 24 brandon (at times).  M13 looked like a spider my friend told me.   M92  has a different shape as well, and both cluster had a solid 20 stars or so visible. 

 

I tried for the Ring nebula.  Curiously I couldnt find it while in my mak.  I was sort of aimlessly moving the 0.6 deg FOV around and didnt stumble across it.  My GSO RA finder wasnt completely aligned either, which didnt help.  I should have found Sulafat or Sheliak and went from there....doh.

 

After some time, the moon was rising and it really started washing out the sky and that glorious milky way almost completely disappeared.  So I just trained my viewing on the moon with both scopes.  The seeing was not great and it didnt look that good in the mak, plus the corrector was just starting to dew over.  It looked great in the small refractor.  I was getting caught up with talking and socializing more than observing and actually started getting cold, even though I had a decent amount of layers on.  My shoes were soaked with the dewy grass and dew basically covered everything anyways.

 

Not a bad night, amazing with the binoculars, but my last session in town was much better with the mak.

 

Thanks for reading and clear skies!  


Edited by Tyson M, 21 September 2019 - 09:40 PM.

 

#388 Jeffmar

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:17 AM

I just got home from a star party. I took my new toy, my C14, and went to quite a few targets. I saw Neptune, M11, M13, M16, M22, M27, M51, M57, Jupiter and Saturn. The best

 

images were Saturn and M11. Saturn was tight, very detailed, and majestic. Jupiter which was maybe 5 degrees lower than Saturn seemed to be caught in a giant hair dryer. It kind of

 

flapped and shimmied. In spite of that I could catch short glimpses of colors, convolutions in the clouds, and the giant red spot. It wasn't as good as I had hoped for but other targets

 

more than made up for that. M11 just popped though the eyepiece. I have never seen it as bright and beautiful. I got some great oohs and ah's from visitors to the party, The Ring

 

Nebula was a big hit among visitors and so were all the star clusters. 


 

#389 aeajr

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 10:05 AM

Was out 9/20 after dark to just after moonrise. Had the 16 inch out with newly cleaned and hotspotted mirror, collimation is almost....fun...with the catseye tools and hotspot.

 

I generally stick with the planets because the light pollution is so bad but tonight I just did deep sky objects and stars, for example Polaris was barely visible naked eye last night (Polaris B being nicely visible in the scope).

 

Started with ring and dumbbell @ 100x, dumbbell was a smudge and ring was apparent with both averted and direct vision.

 

Threw on the lumicon UHC and they were honestly striking, amazing at 100x (looked like the pictures!), sadly I only have a 2 inch filter and could not add any more magnification while using the filter (my DOB's focuser is threaded but its larger than 2 inches).

 

I cranked up m2 and m15 to 200-400 going from a fuzzy glob to filling the eyepiece with an innumerable number of stars was quite the experience.

 

I didn't take any notes hit up some other NGC globs and clusters and called it a night before the dew became a problem. 

 

Double double was a little unforgiving last night both pairs weren't well split until 200's.

Remind us what 16" you have.  It is not noted in your signature.

 

When I read people's observing reports the first thing I try to understand is what equipment they are using and, if possible, what their light pollution situation is, compared to mine.   Gives me a better idea of whether I might be able to see from my site with my equipment.

 

Just a request, not a requirement. 


Edited by aeajr, 22 September 2019 - 10:11 AM.

 

#390 SeaBee1

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 10:19 AM

Well, my dark sky trip quickly approaches! I am set for travel on Tuesday! I ordered and received a DGM UHC 2" filter and an Orion OIII 2" filter last week (to get the obligatory Sky Demons curse out of the way before the trip...) and everything is packed away in my eyepiece case. I have a checklist ready so nothing important gets left behind. I have several target lists in SkySafari 6 Plus with a variety of target types that I can't see from my home site. I checked the forecast for the area and it looks like Wednesday and Thursday will be good!

 

Needless to say... I'm pumped!

 

Clear DARK skies!

 

CB


 

#391 nva

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 10:27 AM

Remind us what 16" you have.  It is not noted in your signature.

 

When I read people's observing reports the first thing I try to understand is what equipment they are using and, if possible, what their light pollution situation is, compared to mine.   Gives me a better idea of whether I might be able to see from my site with my equipment.

 

Just a request, not a requirement. 

I have an ES truss dob and Bortle 8 skies, our skies are likely similar unless you are in the Manhattan white zone.


Edited by nva, 22 September 2019 - 11:00 AM.

 

#392 nva

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 11:17 AM

9/17 - 5 Inch refractor - Planets.

 

Jupiter was not really having it, a bit wavy, reasonable contrast and clarity, bands and planetary detail at 200x, but 150x was better.

 

Saturn however was something else, smaller as always but absolutely razor sharp and 3d it really popped, cassini and the shadow, planetary detail, everything at 200x was a joy.

 

Jupiter has been a curmudgeon all summer, I miss 2018 Mars.


Edited by nva, 22 September 2019 - 12:32 PM.

 

#393 NYJohn S

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 11:41 AM

Three night log.  First two, one hour each due to clouds rolling in.  Decided to work on my knowledge of constellations and utilized “Constellations” in CPC’s menu to identify targets.  Visited Named Stars, Double Stars, Named Objects, Messier & NGC objects in each constellation. 

 

9/17 & 19/19,   60s°,  RH 60-70%   Trans 2, See 3,  9:15 PM to 10:15 PM both nights. 

 

Cygnus;  Deneb, Sadr, 17Cyg (pale yellow, small red), M29 (cluster, look likes a  butterfly), M39 (bright cluster),  NGC6764  Galaxy (unable to see),  Cocoon Nebula (unable to see), Crescent Nebula (mostly visible.  Veil Nebula (full east quite visible, west not so much), A number of other target were available but other than clusters, mags too low for conditions.

 

Cephius; Alderamin, Alrai, Alfirk, (blue white with small red), Kurah (blue white with small red)  Delta  Cep (white with medium blue),  NGC40 (planetary nebula, bright central star, dim bluish rim, great target, can just see in ST120),  NGC188 (loose feint cluster), NGC (number of low mag galaxies, not attempted).

 

Cass; Archid (white with medium orange, possibly a multiple) Caph, Navi, Rukbah, Schedar (white with small yellow) Segan, Eta Cass (white with yellow) Sigma Cass (white with blue, close double), M52 (almost a glob) M103 (cluster, triangular) , Clouds.

 

Best target; NGC40,  at first looked circular, but with further viewing becomes a pair of crisp parentheses accenting the bright easily seen central star.   Surprising amount of color on these. Not sure if it was seeing or the mind, but its interesting how the parentheses faked me out to at first look like a perfect circle.  

 

9/20/19; 60s, RH 60-70%, Trans 3, See 4,  9:15 PM – 12:30 AM

 

Hercules; Cujam, Kornephoros, Maasym (2 yellow mid sized), Rusalgethi (white with small white), Sarin (white with small red), 95Her (two mid sized white), M13, M92.

 

Draco; Alsaphl,  Altais,  Arrakis (2 mid sized white, close), Dziban (medium white with small red, spread), Edasich

Note; Conditions worsened during Draco an Hercules and then improved dramatically here.

 

Aquila; Alshain, Altair, Terazed, NGC6709,35 &38 (open clusters), NGC6741 (plan neb, small trapizoid, fairly bright for small size,  visible in ST120, max mag 666x thru barlowed morpheus 9mm), NGC6749 (medium size glob, stars resolved at 136x, quite visible in ST120), NGC6751 (plan neb, kind of small, feint, max usable mag 230x), NGC6756 & 60 (open clusters, first feint, 2nd moderate), NGC6772 (plan neb, very small and difficult to find, found at 176x, barely, gone at 230x) NGC6778 (plan neb, a smidge broader than 6772, very feint, same on mags) NGC6790 (plan neb, unable to see), NGC6803 (plan neb, another very small feint target, seen at 333x)  

 

Note; Three of these planetary nebula were a real challenge.  Had to stretch them out with high mags to differentiate from stars.

 

Cats Eye:  Central star quite visible.  Felt I could see some nebulosity outside the usual confines of this planetary nebula with averted vision.   Able to stretch mag to 666x, but best at 333x.

 

Ring;  Central star via averted vision for 4 or five seconds at a time.  Was able to repeat with both eyes.  Was getting lower and mag would only carry to 333x overall.  Happy to add this dwarf to the list.  Yea!

 

jd

I visited a few from your report last night with my XT8. NGC40 & Sigma Cas while in those areas. I really enjoyed them both.

 

NGC 40 - Bow Tie Nebula is a nice planetary nebula even with a moderate size telescope. I had what I would call variable transparency last night which made this observation difficult but the seeing was good so I was able to push the magnification all the way to 436x with a Meade 5.5mm & 2x barlow. There was was a nice elongated corona that ran N-S around a bright core. The central star was intermittent as the transparency shifted from average to below average. There must have been a thin layer of vapor moving through. There was a 12th mag star - GSC 4302-0545 right near it just to the SW. Even at 218x the oblong shape was obvious and I could see It was flanked by 2 - 9th mag orange stars that added interest. This is a good object for the suburbs and should be even better on a night with good transparency.

 

NGC 7023 - Iris Nebula & Collinder 427 - This is what brought me to Cepheus in the first place but it proved to be a difficult observation. NGC 7023 is a reflection nebula with a bright 9th mag star in the center. The problem is the star is so bright it makes the nebula difficult to see. It completely washed out the 13th mag open cluster Collinder 427 which is right next to it. I did manage to see some nebulosity extending around the star but I couldn't see the cluster at all. This probably needs dark skies and maybe a larger telescope. Certainly better conditions than I had.

 

Collinder 463 - This is a large open cluster in Cassiopeia that's one of my binocular targets. It was easy to pick up at 50x with the ES 68º 24mm and just fit in the field. It was an interesting mix of relatively faint stars with a nebulous haze from unresolved stars throughout. I'm actually surprised it shows in binoculars but I guess the collective mix of stars is just bright enough to detect. This is where I realized the transparency was constantly changing as the fainter stars slowly dropped out of the cluster and then over time reappeared. Looking up there were no clouds visible.

 

Iota Cassiopeiae - This is a beautiful triple. Even though the seeing was good the transparency made this a tough split as the scatter from 4.6 mag A component made it difficult to see the space between the 6.9 mag B. Sep is 2.9" but it took 217x to get them cleanly split. The AC sep is 71"  and the C is mag 9.1. Once split ι Cas was a bright white with the blue/white B right up against it and the fainter rich yellow C much further from the 2.

 

NGC 7789 - Caroline's Rose - This was positioned well and I think the transparency improved a little. I viewed it at 50x, 75x & 136x. At 136x it filled the eyepiece and the small stars resolved well. The swirling patterns from the chains of stars and the dark voids between them are so intricate it takes time to study it and take it all in. The low power view - 50x was interesting in another way. The fainter unresolved stars created a haze of light with specks of resolved stars and dark areas in between. It may actually be easier to see the rose shape when viewed like this.

 

Sigma Cassiopeiae - Thanks to JD I stopped by this while in the area. I forgot what a nice double it is. The A-B sep is 3.1" at 326º but they appeared closer to me. I had a nice split at 218x. The mag 5 - A component looked white and the mag 7.2 - B a very deep blue to me. Very nice!

 

M52, CZ43 - After that I made the hop to M52. At 50x I had a nice view of M52 together with nearby open cluster CZ43 both separated by a line of 4 colorful stars. The bright orange 4 Cas was in view to the N. Shifting toward 4 Cas I picked up Hrr 12 the Y or wishbone asterism. Hrr 12 has a deep red 6.71 mag super giant at the base of the stem and 2 nice 6 mag orange/red stars on the S end of the Y. Together with 4 Cas there were a lot of colorful stars in view. Back to M52, I viewed it at 136x & 215x. At 215x it just about filled the eyepiece with stars set off by a bright yellow star on it's SW side. 

 

M31, M32, M110 - I got to this a little late and the moon was just starting to rise. Still at 31x I could see the dust lane in M31 just above the core to the NW as a sharp drop off. M32 was below to the S as a hazy spot. M110 was visible to the NW as a faint diffuse glow. I tried following the dust lane in M31 at 50x but it didn't seem to extend that far from the core in either direction. M32 was easier to see at the higher magnification and M110 showed a little better as well. 

 

M33 - Moving closer to the Moon I thought this would be a long shot but I did manage to locate and spot it at both 31x & 50x. It was very difficult to see against the brightening sky but showed as a large diffuse area with no defined core or edges. I consider just detecting this at home a win for me.

 

I made a trip in with my observing chair, table and eyepieces and on the way back noticed M45 was above the tress. With no eyepieces I took a quick look at it through the 9x50 finder. It's close to what I get with binoculars and was the perfect ending to the night. 

 

Clear Skies

John


Edited by NYJohn S, 22 September 2019 - 01:24 PM.

 

#394 NYJohn S

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 11:52 AM

Well, my dark sky trip quickly approaches! I am set for travel on Tuesday! I ordered and received a DGM UHC 2" filter and an Orion OIII 2" filter last week (to get the obligatory Sky Demons curse out of the way before the trip...) and everything is packed away in my eyepiece case. I have a checklist ready so nothing important gets left behind. I have several target lists in SkySafari 6 Plus with a variety of target types that I can't see from my home site. I checked the forecast for the area and it looks like Wednesday and Thursday will be good!

 

Needless to say... I'm pumped!

 

Clear DARK skies!

 

CB

CB, Good luck on your trip!. Sounds so exciting and you got yourself 2 great filters to try out. I'm both excited for you and jealous! lol. Sincerely just want the best for you. Where exactly are you headed? I know you mentioned it but just don't recall where it is.

 

John


 

#395 Tyson M

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 12:56 PM

I visited a few from your report last night with my XT8. NGC40 & Sigma Cas while in those areas. I really enjoyed them both.

 

NGC 40 - Bow Tie Nebula is a nice planetary nebula even with a moderate size telescope. I had what I would call variable transparency last night which made this observation difficult but the seeing was good so I was able to push the magnification all the way to 436x with a Meade 5.5mm & 2x barlow. There was was a nice elongated corona that ran N-S around a bright core. The central star was intermittent as the transparency shifted from average to below average. There must have been a thin layer of vapor moving through. There was a 12th mag star - GSC 4302-0545 right near it just to the SW. Even at 218x the oblong shape was obvious and I could see It was flanked by 2 - 9th mag orange stars that added interest. This is a good object for the suburbs and should be even better on a night with good transparency.

 

NGC 7023 - Iris Nebula & Collinder 427 - This is what brought me to Cepheus in the first place but it proved to be a difficult observation. NGC 7023 is a reflection nebula with a bright 9th mag star in the center. The problem is the star is so bright it makes the nebula difficult to see. It completely washed out the 13th mag open cluster Collinder 427 which is right next to it. I did manage to see some nebulosity extending around the star but I couldn't see the cluster at all. This probably needs dark skies and maybe a larger telescope. Certainly better conditions that I had.

 

Collinder 463 - This is a large open cluster in Cassiopeia that's one of my binocular targets. It was easy to pick up at 50x with the ES 68º 24mm and just fit in the field. It was an interesting mix of relatively faint stars with a nebulous haze from unresolved stars throughout. I'm actually surprised it shows in binoculars but I guess the collective mix of stars is just bright enough to detect. This is where I realized the transparency was constantly changing as the fainter stars slowly dropped out of the cluster and then over time reappeared. Looking up there were no clouds visible.

 

Iota Cassiopeiae - This is a beautiful triple. Even though the seeing was good the transparency made this a a tough split as the scatter from 4.6 mag A component made it difficult to see the space between the 6.9 mag B. Sep is 2.9" but it took 217x to get them cleanly split. The AC sep is 71"  and the C is mag 9.1. Once split ι Cas was a bright white with the blue/white B right up against it and the fainter rich yellow C much further from the 2.

 

NGC 7789 - Caroline's Rose - This was positioned well and I think the transparency improved a little. I viewed it at 50x, 75x & 136x. At 136x it filled the eyepiece and the small stars resolved well. The swirling patterns from the chains of stars and the dark voids between them are so intricate it takes time to study it and take it all in. The low power view - 50x was interesting in another way. The fainter unresolved stars created a haze of light with specks of resolved stars and dark areas in between. It may actually be easier to see the rose shape when viewed like this.

 

Sigma Cassiopeiae - Thanks to JD I stopped by this while in the area. I forgot what a nice double it is. The A-B sep is 3.1" at 326º but they appeared closer to me. I had a nice split at 218x. The mag 5 - A component looked white and the mag 7.2 - B a very deep blue to me. Very nice!

 

M52, CZ43 - After that I made the hop to M52. At 50x I had a nice view of M52 together with nearby open cluster CZ43 both separated by a line of 4 colorful stars. The bright orange 4 Cas was in view to the N. Shifting toward 4 Cas I picked up Hrr 12 the Y or wishbone asterism. Hrr 12 has a deep red 6.71 mag super giant at the base of the stem and 2 nice 6 mag orange/red stars on the S end of the Y. Together with 4 Cas there's a lot of colorful stars in view. Back to M52, I viewed it at 136x & 215x. At 215x it just about filled the eyepiece with stars set off by a bright yellow star on it's SW side. 

 

M31, M32, M110 - I got to this a little late and the moon was just starting to rise. Still at 31x I could see the dust lane in M31 just above the core to the NW as a sharp drop off. M32 was below to the S as a hazy spot. M110 was visible to the NW as a faint diffuse glow. I tried following the dust lane in M31 at 50x but it didn't seem to extend that far from the core in either direction. M32 was easier to see at the higher magnification and M110 showed a little better as well. 

 

M33 - Moving closer to the Moon I thought this would be a long shot but I did manage to locate and spot it at both 31x & 50x. It was very difficult to see against the brightening sky but showed as a large diffuse area with no defined core or edges. I consider just detecting this at home a win for me.

 

I made a trip in with my observing chair, table and eyepieces and on the way back noticed M45 was above the tress. With no eyepieces I took a quick look at it through the 9x50 finder. It's close to what I get with binoculars and was the perfect ending to the night. 

 

Clear Skies

John

Nice report.  I am going to try for most of these cass targets with my 8" scope next outing.


 

#396 aeajr

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 02:32 PM

I have an ES truss dob and Bortle 8 skies, our skies are likely similar unless you are in the Manhattan white zone.

I am in a "Dark White" zone, one better than Manhattan.  I count it as Bortle 8 with best naked eye stars at about mag 3.7. tons of ground light pollution too.

 

Still having fun!


 

#397 member010719

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 03:12 PM

Just an opinion after reading the comments about finders.

 

RDF are lousy finders if we compare the accuracy of their pointing with that of magnifying finders.

However, red dot finders have an outstanding property : you can create artificial asterisms on the sky with them.

Just look on the map,figure out the triangle,square,rectangle or what ever is making the searched DSO with neighboring stars.

Put the red dot  to recreate that figure on the sky and ,with a high probability, you will find the searched DSO in your large field eyepiece of the telescope.

 

So,the main property of RDF is their ability to  apply  this geometrical ''diving'' method not the micro/nano pointing to singular objects or positions.

They are showing where the telescope is pointed in a way not duplicated by most other finders. 

 

This are many words for a very simple and effective method.

It took me twenty years to finish the Messier Catalog with the classic method.

Using a combination of  geometrical ''diving'' with the RDF +classical finder+eyepiece hoping I'm well over one thousand  objects in a couple of years.

The main merit is going to RDF.

 

Ziridava


 

#398 The Luckster

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 04:00 PM

21 September 2019

7:00 to 9:00 P.M.

82* F 48% humidity

3S/3T

 

127mm f/15 Mak:

Celestron 1.25" Prism diagonal

ES82 11mm  (173x -- 0.47* fov -- ep 0.72mm)

SVB 18mm 72*  (106x -- 0.68* fov -- ep 1.18mm

 

Planetary only; Jupiter.  The ES 11mm gave the best overall views of Jupiter, with good color and contrast the GRS was plainly visible and displaying a reddish tone with averted vision.  Both polar regions displayed their shading subtleties, and both the main EQ bands were prominent and displayed nice coloring.  Higher mags lost contrast, sharpness and detail.  At 8.8mm, the GRS was not detectable.  The SVB 18mm provided a very tack-sharp and crisp Jupiter, albeit a tinier one to observe.  In the mirrored FoV, Jupiter's moons were positioned as follows:  Ganymede far west (left), then Io east of Jove with Europa a little up north and east, with Callisto out east. 

 

Saturn looked nice in both oculars, allowing easy ring/planet separation, planet shadowing on the rear section of the rings, and the equatorial band was faintly visible in the 11mm.  Titan (Mag 9.35) was easy to view east of and out and south of Saturn.  Rhea (Mag 10.40), also east of but closer to Saturn and a bit north was a difficult averted vision view.  Iapetus (Mag 12.54) was well south of Saturn, and only winked here and there if I was lucky.  I changed to the SVB 18mm in hopes of gaining some contrast and darkness for these dim moons, and the change helped and I was able to confirm Rhea as observed.  However, I cannot truly confirm the Mag 12.54 Iapetus since it's magnitude is too close to the limiting mag (13.2) of my Mak...

 

During the Saturn observations, I observed, noted and confirmed a man-made object in Earth's orbit: Cosmos 2297 Rocket Body.

 

120mm f/5 Refractor

Orion 2" Dielectric Twist-Tight diagonal

GSO 2" dielectric Quartz diagonal

Olivon 30mm 80* 2"  (20x -- 4.00* fov -- ep 6.00mm)

ES82 24mm 2"  (25x -- 3.28* fov -- ep 4.80mm)

ES68 20mm 1.25"  (30x -- 2.27* fov -- ep 4.00mm)

GSO 20mm SuperView 68* 1.25"  (30x -- 2.27* fov -- ep 4.00mm)

 

Mainly, this session was to first light and to casually compare my new Orion 2" Twist-Tight diagonal against my GSO 2" Quartz diagonal with both the Olivon 30mm 2" and the ES 24mm 2".  Comparison objects was M6, M7, M22, M28, M8, M20, M21 M23, M24, M25, M16, M17, M11, M31 and various IC objects in the area.  It was not as dark as it should have been, and there was still plenty of heat and humidity to make for sub-par observing.  Much to my surprise, the Orion 2" diagonal clearly demonstrated darker backgrounds and some snappy contrast.  Open clusters had POP and a 3D-like effect in the Orion diagonal, whereas the GSO 2" Quartz lacked POP and open clusters had a flat-feeling to them.  I literally could see the difference between the two diagonals during observation, in both my mid-level ES ocular and the lower level Olivon; night and day difference.  With the Orion diagonal, I could observe a bit more density in the nebula of M8, and to even greater effect with the O-III.  I thought the GSO 2" was pretty good for the price, but this Orion 2" proved me wrong.  With the new diagonal and the ES 24mm 2", coupled with plenty of steady aversion, I captured whisps of M31's general structure, I could not get this with the GSO.

 

Using the Orion 2" Twist-Tight diagonal: The Twist Tight functions work well, and are quite secure.  Furthermore, the Orion 2" diagonal requires less focus than the GSO 2".  I could not bring my GSO 20mm SuperView 1.25" ocular to focus in the Orion 2" diagonal.  All of my other 1.25" oculars can reach focus on the Orion 2"

 

IMG_0404_LR_LR.jpg

 

I also re-observed the above mentioned targets with both of my mentioned 20mm 1.25" oculars, through a GSO 1.25" diagonal, and the ES68 20mm easily out performed the GSO 20mm on the f/5 Acro.  Still, the GSO 20mm does very well on axis, but needs longer focus to clean up the edges.  Otherwise, the ES68 20mm 1.25" ocular has become my overall favorite in my kit

 

 

80mm f/5 Refractor

GSO 1.25" dielectric diagonal

ES68 24mm 1.25"  (17x -- 4.08* fov -- ep 4.08mm)

ES68 20mm 1.25"  (20x -- 3.40* fov -- ep 4.00mm)

 

Observed M31 through the edge of the light-dome, and even with plenty of aversion and staring my view could not get passed a blob with a brighter core.

 

A painful lower-back limited the amount of objects observed...

 

CS

 

jason


Edited by The Luckster, 22 September 2019 - 04:09 PM.

 

#399 SeaBee1

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 06:46 PM

CB, Good luck on your trip!. Sounds so exciting and you got yourself 2 great filters to try out. I'm both excited for you and jealous! lol. Sincerely just want the best for you. Where exactly are you headed? I know you mentioned it but just don't recall where it is.

 

John

 

Hi John! I am heading for Beaver's Bend State Park in OK, near Broken Bow. I am so looking forward to this trip, even if I never get the scope out... work has been a BEAR lately and I need the time off just to find the normal me. Dark skies and telescope time will be the bonus... I imagine you feel the same way on your trips to Vermont... there is just something about getting away...

 

Thanks you so much for the best wishes!

 

Keep looking up!

 

CB


 

#400 SeaBee1

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 06:59 PM

21 September 2019

7:00 to 9:00 P.M.

82* F 48% humidity

3S/3T

 

127mm f/15 Mak:

Celestron 1.25" Prism diagonal

ES82 11mm  (173x -- 0.47* fov -- ep 0.72mm)

SVB 18mm 72*  (106x -- 0.68* fov -- ep 1.18mm

 

Planetary only; Jupiter.  The ES 11mm gave the best overall views of Jupiter, with good color and contrast the GRS was plainly visible and displaying a reddish tone with averted vision.  Both polar regions displayed their shading subtleties, and both the main EQ bands were prominent and displayed nice coloring.  Higher mags lost contrast, sharpness and detail.  At 8.8mm, the GRS was not detectable.  The SVB 18mm provided a very tack-sharp and crisp Jupiter, albeit a tinier one to observe.  In the mirrored FoV, Jupiter's moons were positioned as follows:  Ganymede far west (left), then Io east of Jove with Europa a little up north and east, with Callisto out east. 

 

Saturn looked nice in both oculars, allowing easy ring/planet separation, planet shadowing on the rear section of the rings, and the equatorial band was faintly visible in the 11mm.  Titan (Mag 9.35) was easy to view east of and out and south of Saturn.  Rhea (Mag 10.40), also east of but closer to Saturn and a bit north was a difficult averted vision view.  Iapetus (Mag 12.54) was well south of Saturn, and only winked here and there if I was lucky.  I changed to the SVB 18mm in hopes of gaining some contrast and darkness for these dim moons, and the change helped and I was able to confirm Rhea as observed.  However, I cannot truly confirm the Mag 12.54 Iapetus since it's magnitude is too close to the limiting mag (13.2) of my Mak...

 

During the Saturn observations, I observed, noted and confirmed a man-made object in Earth's orbit: Cosmos 2297 Rocket Body.

 

120mm f/5 Refractor

Orion 2" Dielectric Twist-Tight diagonal

GSO 2" dielectric Quartz diagonal

Olivon 30mm 80* 2"  (20x -- 4.00* fov -- ep 6.00mm)

ES82 24mm 2"  (25x -- 3.28* fov -- ep 4.80mm)

ES68 20mm 1.25"  (30x -- 2.27* fov -- ep 4.00mm)

GSO 20mm SuperView 68* 1.25"  (30x -- 2.27* fov -- ep 4.00mm)

 

Mainly, this session was to first light and to casually compare my new Orion 2" Twist-Tight diagonal against my GSO 2" Quartz diagonal with both the Olivon 30mm 2" and the ES 24mm 2".  Comparison objects was M6, M7, M22, M28, M8, M20, M21 M23, M24, M25, M16, M17, M11, M31 and various IC objects in the area.  It was not as dark as it should have been, and there was still plenty of heat and humidity to make for sub-par observing.  Much to my surprise, the Orion 2" diagonal clearly demonstrated darker backgrounds and some snappy contrast.  Open clusters had POP and a 3D-like effect in the Orion diagonal, whereas the GSO 2" Quartz lacked POP and open clusters had a flat-feeling to them.  I literally could see the difference between the two diagonals during observation, in both my mid-level ES ocular and the lower level Olivon; night and day difference.  With the Orion diagonal, I could observe a bit more density in the nebula of M8, and to even greater effect with the O-III.  I thought the GSO 2" was pretty good for the price, but this Orion 2" proved me wrong.  With the new diagonal and the ES 24mm 2", coupled with plenty of steady aversion, I captured whisps of M31's general structure, I could not get this with the GSO.

 

Using the Orion 2" Twist-Tight diagonal: The Twist Tight functions work well, and are quite secure.  Furthermore, the Orion 2" diagonal requires less focus than the GSO 2".  I could not bring my GSO 20mm SuperView 1.25" ocular to focus in the Orion 2" diagonal.  All of my other 1.25" oculars can reach focus on the Orion 2"

 

attachicon.gif IMG_0404_LR_LR.jpg

 

I also re-observed the above mentioned targets with both of my mentioned 20mm 1.25" oculars, through a GSO 1.25" diagonal, and the ES68 20mm easily out performed the GSO 20mm on the f/5 Acro.  Still, the GSO 20mm does very well on axis, but needs longer focus to clean up the edges.  Otherwise, the ES68 20mm 1.25" ocular has become my overall favorite in my kit

 

 

80mm f/5 Refractor

GSO 1.25" dielectric diagonal

ES68 24mm 1.25"  (17x -- 4.08* fov -- ep 4.08mm)

ES68 20mm 1.25"  (20x -- 3.40* fov -- ep 4.00mm)

 

Observed M31 through the edge of the light-dome, and even with plenty of aversion and staring my view could not get passed a blob with a brighter core.

 

A painful lower-back limited the amount of objects observed...

 

CS

 

jason

 

Hello Jason! Very nice report on the planetary targets, but I was particularly interested in the new Orion diagonal you mentioned. Nicely reviewed! But, now, I'm in trouble... whereas I was on the fence about getting one, you have now convinced me I NEED one... most especially for the transmission properties of the diagonal...

 

Oh, and all these reports with all these targets... dadburnit, I am on target overload here... sheesh... if my dark sky trip turns out like I think it will, I'll be like a kid in a candy store with his Daddy's credit card...

 

Clear DARK skies!

 

CB


 


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