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#401 Migwan

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Posted 22 September 2019 - 07:03 PM

I visited a few from your report last night with my XT8. NGC40 & Sigma Cas while in those areas. I really enjoyed them both.

 

NGC 40 - Bow Tie Nebula is a nice planetary nebula even with a moderate size telescope. I had what I would call variable transparency last night which made this observation difficult but the seeing was good so I was able to push the magnification all the way to 436x with a Meade 5.5mm & 2x barlow. There was was a nice elongated corona that ran N-S around a bright core. The central star was intermittent as the transparency shifted from average to below average. There must have been a thin layer of vapor moving through. There was a 12th mag star - GSC 4302-0545 right near it just to the SW. Even at 218x the oblong shape was obvious and I could see It was flanked by 2 - 9th mag orange stars that added interest. This is a good object for the suburbs and should be even better on a night with good transparency.

 

NGC 7023 - Iris Nebula & Collinder 427 - This is what brought me to Cepheus in the first place but it proved to be a difficult observation. NGC 7023 is a reflection nebula with a bright 9th mag star in the center. The problem is the star is so bright it makes the nebula difficult to see. It completely washed out the 13th mag open cluster Collinder 427 which is right next to it. I did manage to see some nebulosity extending around the star but I couldn't see the cluster at all. This probably needs dark skies and maybe a larger telescope. Certainly better conditions than I had.

 

Collinder 463 - This is a large open cluster in Cassiopeia that's one of my binocular targets. It was easy to pick up at 50x with the ES 68º 24mm and just fit in the field. It was an interesting mix of relatively faint stars with a nebulous haze from unresolved stars throughout. I'm actually surprised it shows in binoculars but I guess the collective mix of stars is just bright enough to detect. This is where I realized the transparency was constantly changing as the fainter stars slowly dropped out of the cluster and then over time reappeared. Looking up there were no clouds visible.

 

Iota Cassiopeiae - This is a beautiful triple. Even though the seeing was good the transparency made this a tough split as the scatter from 4.6 mag A component made it difficult to see the space between the 6.9 mag B. Sep is 2.9" but it took 217x to get them cleanly split. The AC sep is 71"  and the C is mag 9.1. Once split ι Cas was a bright white with the blue/white B right up against it and the fainter rich yellow C much further from the 2.

 

NGC 7789 - Caroline's Rose - This was positioned well and I think the transparency improved a little. I viewed it at 50x, 75x & 136x. At 136x it filled the eyepiece and the small stars resolved well. The swirling patterns from the chains of stars and the dark voids between them are so intricate it takes time to study it and take it all in. The low power view - 50x was interesting in another way. The fainter unresolved stars created a haze of light with specks of resolved stars and dark areas in between. It may actually be easier to see the rose shape when viewed like this.

 

Sigma Cassiopeiae - Thanks to JD I stopped by this while in the area. I forgot what a nice double it is. The A-B sep is 3.1" at 326º but they appeared closer to me. I had a nice split at 218x. The mag 5 - A component looked white and the mag 7.2 - B a very deep blue to me. Very nice!

 

M52, CZ43 - After that I made the hop to M52. At 50x I had a nice view of M52 together with nearby open cluster CZ43 both separated by a line of 4 colorful stars. The bright orange 4 Cas was in view to the N. Shifting toward 4 Cas I picked up Hrr 12 the Y or wishbone asterism. Hrr 12 has a deep red 6.71 mag super giant at the base of the stem and 2 nice 6 mag orange/red stars on the S end of the Y. Together with 4 Cas there were a lot of colorful stars in view. Back to M52, I viewed it at 136x & 215x. At 215x it just about filled the eyepiece with stars set off by a bright yellow star on it's SW side. 

 

M31, M32, M110 - I got to this a little late and the moon was just starting to rise. Still at 31x I could see the dust lane in M31 just above the core to the NW as a sharp drop off. M32 was below to the S as a hazy spot. M110 was visible to the NW as a faint diffuse glow. I tried following the dust lane in M31 at 50x but it didn't seem to extend that far from the core in either direction. M32 was easier to see at the higher magnification and M110 showed a little better as well. 

 

M33 - Moving closer to the Moon I thought this would be a long shot but I did manage to locate and spot it at both 31x & 50x. It was very difficult to see against the brightening sky but showed as a large diffuse area with no defined core or edges. I consider just detecting this at home a win for me.

 

I made a trip in with my observing chair, table and eyepieces and on the way back noticed M45 was above the tress. With no eyepieces I took a quick look at it through the 9x50 finder. It's close to what I get with binoculars and was the perfect ending to the night. 

 

Clear Skies

John

How in the world do you remember all this.  Amazing.  Some really great targets too.

 

I haven't been scanning mush this year, due to too few and such short windows.  Not being in that mode, I fail to note (or remember) other objects seen.   i.e. the triple you mentioned near NGC40 or how various nebulosity around quite a number of targets.   I really do need a secretary.   Maybe a push to talk recorder. 

 

jd


 

#402 brentknight

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 12:19 AM

Just an opinion after reading the comments about finders.

 

RDF are lousy finders if we compare the accuracy of their pointing with that of magnifying finders.

However, red dot finders have an outstanding property : you can create artificial asterisms on the sky with them.

Just look on the map,figure out the triangle,square,rectangle or what ever is making the searched DSO with neighboring stars.

Put the red dot  to recreate that figure on the sky and ,with a high probability, you will find the searched DSO in your large field eyepiece of the telescope.

 

So,the main property of RDF is their ability to  apply  this geometrical ''diving'' method not the micro/nano pointing to singular objects or positions.

They are showing where the telescope is pointed in a way not duplicated by most other finders. 

 

This are many words for a very simple and effective method.

It took me twenty years to finish the Messier Catalog with the classic method.

Using a combination of  geometrical ''diving'' with the RDF +classical finder+eyepiece hoping I'm well over one thousand  objects in a couple of years.

The main merit is going to RDF.

 

Ziridava

RDFs are fine - I suppose, but I don't get how this method of using asterisms is unique to them...  I guess you're talking about using the RDF to get in the ballpark, and then switching to an optical finder to fine-tune.

 

The problem I have with RDFs or reflex sights or even optical finders is that they tend to fog over fairly quickly around here (I know it's possible to purchase dew control devices, but that seems a little silly to me to spend over $100 on fixing a $50 finder).  The pointers also tend to block some of the already feeble light from the stars in the sky.  Many of us also struggle to even make out the brightest stars in the constellations and so these pointing devices won't really help in those situations.

 

I'm a rebel when it comes to finders - what can I say.  I love lasers.  And these are the reasons why...

  • Lasers don't fog over - ever.  And if you get the correct ones, they don't shut down in the cold
  • Lasers don't block any light.  As long as they are not the super bright kind, they should not do any damage to your night vision from any locations other than the most dark.
  • They are simple to align.  I point my telescope anywhere in the sky and look for the end of the laser beam in the field of my 22mm or 30mm eyepiece.  I don't need a fixed point or a bright star - a blank, empty patch of sky works just fine.
  • Combined with a good pair of binoculars, I can locate very faint reference stars to use when I star hop.  I can then move the telescope to the exact spot in my binoculars using the laser as a crosshair.  In my experience, the binoculars are much easier to use as an optical finder because they are binoculars - I'm using both eyes and my head is facing the same direction that I'm trying to point to.
  • When I use the laser with my tracking dob, I don't even need to be that close to the telescope to star hop.  I can stand straight up and use the hand controller to move the telescope.  I've never done this, but I could probably be sitting in my observing chair or a lounge chair.
  • One cool thing I can do with the laser that I don't think any other finder solution can do is that I can use the laser mounted on my tracking dob as the pointer for any of my other telescopes.  With a second laser mounted on my 120ST for example, I can move it to the exact location that the big dob is pointed to and compare the view.

The best dark site I can go to that's within a 2 hour drive is empty of other astronomers.  I won't be bothering any imagers while I'm up there.  If I were to go to a more organized gaze at a dark site that didn't allow lasers, I'd probably attach my old Telrad I suppose.  If I hear a helicopter or an airplane at my house, I turn the thing off and wait for it to pass (there aren't many around here though).  I don't really think most of my neighbors would even notice a laser coming through their window with all the bright stadium lights they often leave on.

 

Obviously a laser is not for everyone, but I sure do enjoy using mine.


Edited by brentknight, 23 September 2019 - 12:48 AM.

 

#403 brentknight

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 12:31 AM

Tonight looked like a fine evening.  Best transparency I've seen in about a month.  Off and on last week I've been studying for my Microsoft test and all during this weekend.  I have to pass this test to keep my job, so it's a little more important than going stargazing.  I should be done before the next weekend and I'm not going to say anything about what the skies might look like...


 

#404 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 01:23 AM

Tonight looked like a fine evening.  Best transparency I've seen in about a month.  Off and on last week I've been studying for my Microsoft test and all during this weekend.  I have to pass this test to keep my job, so it's a little more important than going stargazing.  I should be done before the next weekend and I'm not going to say anything about what the skies might look like...

Try not to mix up ctrl alt tab with alt az and I'm sure you'll be fine.  /s


 

#405 SeaBee1

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 07:25 AM

Tonight looked like a fine evening.  Best transparency I've seen in about a month.  Off and on last week I've been studying for my Microsoft test and all during this weekend.  I have to pass this test to keep my job, so it's a little more important than going stargazing.  I should be done before the next weekend and I'm not going to say anything about what the skies might look like...

 

C'mon man! All work and no play can make Brent a dull boy! Besides, taking a break during study will help the retention factor... mrevil.gif in theory, anyway...

 

Seriously, good luck on the test!

 

CB


 

#406 Migwan

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:45 AM


The problem I have with RDFs or reflex sights or even optical finders is that they tend to fog over fairly quickly around here (I know it's possible to purchase dew control devices, but that seems a little silly to me to spend over $100 on fixing a $50 finder).  The pointers also tend to block some of the already feeble light from the stars in the sky.  Many of us also struggle to even make out the brightest stars in the constellations and so these pointing devices won't really help in those situations.

 

I'm a rebel when it comes to finders - what can I say.  I love lasers.  And these are the reasons why...

  • Lasers don't fog over - ever.  And if you get the correct ones, they don't shut down in the cold

Haven't spent $100 on my whole dew control system, including the telrad, two eyepieces and two scopes.   I really like the telrad.  That said, you have convinced me I need (or maybe just want) a laser.   What do you recommend?   Hope its cheap.  jd

Attached Thumbnails

  • telraddew2.jpg
  • EPdew2.jpg
  • dewcontroller2.jpg

 

#407 Traffalger1698

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 11:40 AM

Observation log Sept 19 2019

Aprox 2315 hours

Central MN Bortle 4 Skies

Temp: 64F  Dew Point 62F Humidity 93%

 

 

Tonight I tried for the first time viewing Andromeda.  I walked outside realized it was clear and started panning my Sky Guide app to see if there was anything of interest to look at.  Well to my surprise Andromeda was rising in the sky.  I pulled out my Vortex Viper HD and found the galaxy with relatively little trouble.  A semi fuzzy not super dim splotch in the night sky.  Conditions were less than ideal with high humidity, The rising 75% moon and Temp real close to dew point.  But never having viewed that before, I wanted to try. 


I allowed my Zhumel Z130 to equalize to the ambient temp before I started my quest.  It took a surprising amount of time to locate the object in the telescope vs my binoculars.  When I finally did find it I have to say I was slightly disappointed.   I could see it with my widest eyepiece (32mm Meade Series 4000) but it was way dimmer than through my binoculars.  I switched eyepieces and it was incredibly dim in my 9mm gold line.  A faint fuzzy splotch in the night sky.  I was able to view it so that part was successful but I didn't expect my 10x50 hunting binoculars to be the clearest and brightest view if it. 


For those of you that know more than me:  Any thoughts as to why that might that be how can I get better views if it?  Is this just poor conditions coupled with a relatively small scope?  Would different/better eyepieces help here?  Or is it more I simply need a larger telescope for more detail?  I love my small Z130 but I have been wanting a second telescope that is a bit larger.  (I have been watching the classifieds for an 8-10 inch but the closest used one is 5 hours away.)


Thanks for reading and Clear Skies.


 

#408 brentknight

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 01:55 PM

Haven't spent $100 on my whole dew control system, including the telrad, two eyepieces and two scopes.   I really like the telrad.  That said, you have convinced me I need (or maybe just want) a laser.   What do you recommend?   Hope its cheap.  jd

You are a clever one - I don't know if I have those kinda skills.  The eyepiece heaters would be more useful to me than the finders though.

 

The Z-bolt's often go on sale, but these are what I use and recommend.  You can get a Lithium-Ion one for about $10 more but rechargeable AAA work fine for me.  Currently $58 plus a mount for them.

 

https://www.custom-l...omy-green-laser


 

#409 NYJohn S

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 02:11 PM

Observation log Sept 19 2019

Aprox 2315 hours

Central MN Bortle 4 Skies

Temp: 64F  Dew Point 62F Humidity 93%

 

 

Tonight I tried for the first time viewing Andromeda.  I walked outside realized it was clear and started panning my Sky Guide app to see if there was anything of interest to look at.  Well to my surprise Andromeda was rising in the sky.  I pulled out my Vortex Viper HD and found the galaxy with relatively little trouble.  A semi fuzzy not super dim splotch in the night sky.  Conditions were less than ideal with high humidity, The rising 75% moon and Temp real close to dew point.  But never having viewed that before, I wanted to try. 

I allowed my Zhumel Z130 to equalize to the ambient temp before I started my quest.  It took a surprising amount of time to locate the object in the telescope vs my binoculars.  When I finally did find it I have to say I was slightly disappointed.   I could see it with my widest eyepiece (32mm Meade Series 4000) but it was way dimmer than through my binoculars.  I switched eyepieces and it was incredibly dim in my 9mm gold line.  A faint fuzzy splotch in the night sky.  I was able to view it so that part was successful but I didn't expect my 10x50 hunting binoculars to be the clearest and brightest view if it. 

For those of you that know more than me:  Any thoughts as to why that might that be how can I get better views if it?  Is this just poor conditions coupled with a relatively small scope?  Would different/better eyepieces help here?  Or is it more I simply need a larger telescope for more detail?  I love my small Z130 but I have been wanting a second telescope that is a bit larger.  (I have been watching the classifieds for an 8-10 inch but the closest used one is 5 hours away.)

Thanks for reading and Clear Skies.

 

Hi Joe

 

I think you felt what we all probably thought when viewing M31 through a telescope for the first time. It can be underwhelming and doesn't live up to our expectations. I know I thought I would see spiral arms and all kinds of detail. All I can say is keep at it and you'll start to be able to see detail that you didn't realize was there. Binoculars are actually a good way to view it because it such a large object. Your Z130 with the 32mm PL is also good combination because it gives you a nice wide 2.56º field so you can fit the entire galaxy. Dark skies help but your bortle 4 skies are pretty good, better than what I have here. Try again when it's higher in the sky and without the moon. A 75% moon will really wash out any detail.

 

A few things to look for are, M32. It will look like a fuzzy star at low power. If you increase the magnification it will be easier to tell that it's not a star but another galaxy. M110 is another nearby galaxy. This one is larger but more diffuse and much harder to see (See the attached sketch). You should be able to spot it with some practice on a good night. 

 

Within M31 there's a dust lane that's pretty easy to see in a small telescope. Just above the core or on the same side as M110 you'll notice a pretty hard line where the haze drops off and gets darker. If conditions are good it extends on each side of the galaxy. In dark skies I can see a little more haze that peeks out on the other side of the drop off so it looks like a double line. I try to follow it to see how far extends. Patience and letting your eyes dark adapt really helps here.

 

Here's a sketch of some details that can be seen and a screen shot from Sky Safari showing the FOV your Z130 will give you. I always look at how far M32 is from M31 when viewing it. At home there's a large space between them which means I'm mostly seeing the core. In dark skies I've seen them just about touching. 

 

Good luck!

John

Attached Thumbnails

  • Screen Shot 2019-09-23 at 2.55.21 PM copy.jpg
  • M31.jpg

Edited by NYJohn S, 23 September 2019 - 06:23 PM.

 

#410 Traffalger1698

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 03:46 PM

Hi Joe

 

I think you felt what we all probably thought when viewing M31 through a telescope for the first time. It can be underwhelming and doesn't live up to our expectations. I know I thought I would see spiral arms and all kinds of detail. All I can say is keep at it and you'll start to be able to see detail that you didn't realize was there. Binoculars are actually a good way to view it because it such a large object. You're Z130 with the 32mm PL is also good combination because it gives you a nice wide 2.56º field so you can fit the entire galaxy. Dark skies help but your bortle 4 skies are pretty good, better than what I have here. Try again when it's higher in the sky and without the moon. A 75% moon will really wash out any detail.

 

A few things to look for are, M32. It will look like a fuzzy star at low power. If you increase the magnification it will be easier to tell that it's not a star but another galaxy. M110 is another nearby galaxy. This one is larger but more diffuse and much harder to see (See the attached sketch). You should be able to spot it with some practice on a good night. 

 

Within M31 there's a dust lane that's pretty easy to see in a small telescope. Just above the core or on the same side as M110 you'll notice a pretty hard line where the haze drops off and gets darker. If conditions are good it extends on each side of the galaxy. In dark skies I can see a little more haze that peeks out on the other side of the drop off so it looks like a double line. I try to follow it to see how far extends. Patience and letting your eyes dark adapt really helps here.

 

Here's a sketch of some details that can be seen and a screen shot from Sky Safari showing the FOV your Z130 will give you. I always look at how far M32 is from M31 when viewing it. At home there's a large space between them which means I'm mostly seeing the core. In dark skies I've seen them just about touching. 

 

Good luck!

John

I appreciate the words of wisdom. Honestly reading what you wrote I think I was expecting something alot smaller.  Maybe more along the lines of saturn the first time I viewd it.  The majority of what I've viewed so far has been Planets, the moon, and a few star clusters.   This was the first galaxy I've tried to view I was not expecting something so big and diffuse.  You could be right about letting my eyes adjust as well, and I knew the moon would not help.  I will keep this in mind the next time I view it.  Hopefully with less moon and less humidity (as I have not made a dew shield for it yet.) 

 

I look forward to trying again. 


 

#411 Migwan

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 06:41 PM

Observation log Sept 19 2019

Aprox 2315 hours

Central MN Bortle 4 Skies

Temp: 64F  Dew Point 62F Humidity 93%

 

 

Tonight I tried for the first time viewing Andromeda.  I walked outside realized it was clear and started panning my Sky Guide app to see if there was anything of interest to look at.  Well to my surprise Andromeda was rising in the sky.  I pulled out my Vortex Viper HD and found the galaxy with relatively little trouble.  A semi fuzzy not super dim splotch in the night sky.  Conditions were less than ideal with high humidity, The rising 75% moon and Temp real close to dew point.  But never having viewed that before, I wanted to try. 

I allowed my Zhumel Z130 to equalize to the ambient temp before I started my quest.  It took a surprising amount of time to locate the object in the telescope vs my binoculars.  When I finally did find it I have to say I was slightly disappointed.   I could see it with my widest eyepiece (32mm Meade Series 4000) but it was way dimmer than through my binoculars.  I switched eyepieces and it was incredibly dim in my 9mm gold line.  A faint fuzzy splotch in the night sky.  I was able to view it so that part was successful but I didn't expect my 10x50 hunting binoculars to be the clearest and brightest view if it. 

For those of you that know more than me:  Any thoughts as to why that might that be how can I get better views if it?  Is this just poor conditions coupled with a relatively small scope?  Would different/better eyepieces help here?  Or is it more I simply need a larger telescope for more detail?  I love my small Z130 but I have been wanting a second telescope that is a bit larger.  (I have been watching the classifieds for an 8-10 inch but the closest used one is 5 hours away.)

Thanks for reading and Clear Skies.

Shame on that little old moon killing all those galaxies.    Try to catch it closer to zenith without the moon and when transparency is above average or better.    I find that something over 3° field of view works best.  My best view of it was on an exceptional night with my ST80 and 24ES68 with a fov of 4°.  The dust lanes were easily visible with direct vision and it was this view that caused me to upgrade to an ST120.  I haven't had that good of a night yet with my ST120 and an APM30 with a 3.5° fov, but have been able to make out dust lanes on a couple of nights with above average transparency.  Just not as good as as on that truly transparent night.   jd


Edited by Migwan, 23 September 2019 - 06:46 PM.

 

#412 jklein

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 07:17 PM

Hello Jason! Very nice report on the planetary targets, but I was particularly interested in the new Orion diagonal you mentioned. Nicely reviewed! But, now, I'm in trouble... whereas I was on the fence about getting one, you have now convinced me I NEED one... most especially for the transmission properties of the diagonal...

 

Oh, and all these reports with all these targets... dadburnit, I am on target overload here... sheesh... if my dark sky trip turns out like I think it will, I'll be like a kid in a candy store with his Daddy's credit card...

 

Clear DARK skies!

 

CB

My first dark site (Bortle 3) with my telescope:

I had printed out all the Messier objects that would be visible (about 60) and I had a plan to go through them and get as many as possible. It was January, so Orion and Andromeda were up. I spent a GREAT deal of time going back and forth between the two, since I had never seen them look so splendid. Then I would go look at some other stuff, and come back to these two. Then I would sit back in my chair and and just drink it all in; I was basically overwhelmed. The next time at the dark site, I was was much more disciplined and stuck to the plan. I was a kid in a candy store, too, but I basically bought only two kinds of candysmirk.gif .

 

Since you have two nights in a row, you might get a chance to recover from being gobsmacked.

 

Enjoy your time in the dark.


 

#413 MP173

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:01 PM

Sept 23, 2019 - session 36

SS 646pm

T 66, DP 50, H 52

 

Scope AT102Ed

Eyepieces:

32mm - 22x, 2.3 fov

26mm - 27x, 1.9 fov

20mm 36x, 1.46 fov

16mm 44 x , 1.17 fov

9mm 79x, .65 fov

 

Outside at 720 and took a look at both Saturn and Jupiter.  I often use these two early in the evening during twilight to "warm up" and adjust to the darkness.  

 

I moved to the northeast to Casseopeia and centered on Caph, the Beta star.  I always liked the FOV with Caph, there is a visual triple and visual double just to the south.  I moved a bit further to STF 3057 and STF 3062 (which is out of my league with a 1.6" separation.  These two are bright and only 13' separation....would be a good binocular double.

 

STF 3057 proved to be challenging as it took 158x (9mm x barlow) to resolve.  There seemed to be considerable "bounce" in the sky early on.  Data - 6.7/9.3, 3.9" @ 298 degrees.  

 

Moved to NGC 7789 - Carolines Rose -  interesting to view during the twilight.  Not much at first, but as darkness fell, stars would appear.  Also with shorter focal length EP the view darkened bringing more stars into play.  I viewed about 20 stars with 20mm and then moved on to STF 3049 which was only one degree south.  This also proved challenging but yielded the companion at 158x again - 5.0/7.2, 3.1" @ 326.

 

Back to Caroline's Rose and used several eyepieces with success with the 9mm as about 50 stars were available.  

 

Returned to Caph and then ventured NW to STTA 254 also known as WZ Cass.  This is a brilliant red star with three companions available to me.  The AB (7.4/8.3, 58" @ 89) was easy with 32mm and I used the 20mm to view AC (9.6mag, 115" @ 324) and AD 10.3, 181" @ 118 degrees.

 

I then entered open cluster alley as NGC 9788, NGC 9790, and Frolov 1 were all in a narrow range.  Hard to tell the clusters apart.  I sketched NGC 9790 and then realized it was actually 9788.  Sort of like a suburban area.

 

Moved east 2 degrees to STF 3037 which was the view of the night.  It is a quad star and it took effort to view all four.  The AC was easy at 20mm, but it took 158x to see the AB and AD stars.  Why?  AB is tight - 2.7" and AD is dim at 10.9 mag.  All were seen with the 9mm with 2x barlow.

Data - AB 7.4/9.2, 2.7" @ 212, AC 9.9, 29" @ 190 and AD 10.9 mag, 52" @ 233.  One of the better systems I have seen all year.  Tough but fair.

 

M52 was next.  It is always difficult for me to locate and it took a few minutes. The Y pattern of Hrr12 provides a jumping off point, but i went north while I should have moved south.  Finally spotted it - about 20 stars with the 9mm darkening the background.

 

I moved to Hrr 12 which is a big bright group.  Is this an open cluster or an asterism?  Either way, it is entertaining.

 

Took a look at Double Cluster and Stock 2 and headed inside at 920pm.

 

Temp 62 degrees with DP of 51 with humidity moving up to 76%.  Rain is moving in tomorrow.

 

Ed


 

#414 The Luckster

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Posted 23 September 2019 - 10:39 PM

Observation log Sept 19 2019

Aprox 2315 hours

Central MN Bortle 4 Skies

Temp: 64F  Dew Point 62F Humidity 93%

 

 

Tonight I tried for the first time viewing Andromeda.  I walked outside realized it was clear and started panning my Sky Guide app to see if there was anything of interest to look at.  Well to my surprise Andromeda was rising in the sky.  I pulled out my Vortex Viper HD and found the galaxy with relatively little trouble.  A semi fuzzy not super dim splotch in the night sky.  Conditions were less than ideal with high humidity, The rising 75% moon and Temp real close to dew point.  But never having viewed that before, I wanted to try. 

I allowed my Zhumel Z130 to equalize to the ambient temp before I started my quest.  It took a surprising amount of time to locate the object in the telescope vs my binoculars.  When I finally did find it I have to say I was slightly disappointed.   I could see it with my widest eyepiece (32mm Meade Series 4000) but it was way dimmer than through my binoculars.  I switched eyepieces and it was incredibly dim in my 9mm gold line.  A faint fuzzy splotch in the night sky.  I was able to view it so that part was successful but I didn't expect my 10x50 hunting binoculars to be the clearest and brightest view if it. 

For those of you that know more than me:  Any thoughts as to why that might that be how can I get better views if it?  Is this just poor conditions coupled with a relatively small scope?  Would different/better eyepieces help here?  Or is it more I simply need a larger telescope for more detail?  I love my small Z130 but I have been wanting a second telescope that is a bit larger.  (I have been watching the classifieds for an 8-10 inch but the closest used one is 5 hours away.)

Thanks for reading and Clear Skies.

 

Don't feel too bummed, Joe, my best views of M31 ever (so far) were with my Meade 15x70 binocular during a new moon and Andromeda was at zenith (owe, my neck!).  With loads of constant averted vision and bino-bracing, M31 slowly materialized into the galactic form in pictures.  It was breathtaking, stretching well over have the FoV of the Meade's 4.4* degree FoV.  This was from my balcony.  I have yet to recreate that view of M31 with any of my telescopes/oculars/diagonals, etc.

 

Furthermore, I have seen more faint fuzzies with my binoculars...two eyes gathering light are better than one!

 

My point is simple; don't fret it too much, your goal is to observe and to get the best possible observations with the gear at hand (whether it be eyes, binoculars, telescopes--oh my).  There will come a time when you find yourself at a dark site, and your telescope will sing with spectacular views that will leave you speechless.  Of course, after such a wonderful experience, you will automatically think to yourself; "If I only had that 16" Dob...wink.gif

 

CS

 

jason


 

#415 aeajr

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 07:37 AM

I am so excited. I leave for Cherry Springs Black Forest Star Party Friday morning.  This will be my first experience at a truly dark site.  

https://bfsp.org/

 

Will have my 12" Dob and my ETX 80 with me to give me both ends of the spectrum for power and field of view.   

 

I need to start working on a list of what I want to observe.   With luck we will have two good nights.  The plan is to observe all night and sleep all day.   We will see how that works out. 

 

Keep your fingers crossed for me boys and girls. 


 

#416 NYJohn S

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 05:41 PM

I am so excited. I leave for Cherry Springs Black Forest Star Party Friday morning.  This will be my first experience at a truly dark site.  

https://bfsp.org/

 

Will have my 12" Dob and my ETX 80 with me to give me both ends of the spectrum for power and field of view.   

 

I need to start working on a list of what I want to observe.   With luck we will have two good nights.  The plan is to observe all night and sleep all day.   We will see how that works out. 

 

Keep your fingers crossed for me boys and girls. 

It looks like you should have some good weather Ed. Can't wait to hear how the big dob does in dark skies like that. It should be amazing!


 

#417 MP173

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Posted 24 September 2019 - 10:14 PM

Sept 24, 2019 - session 37

SS 644pm, no moon

T 70, DP 55, H 54%

10 - 15 mph wind

 

Scope AT102Ed

EPs:

32mm - 22x  - 2.34 fov

26mm 27x - 1.9 fov

20mm 36x - 1.46fov

16mm 44 x - 1.17 fov

9mm 79x - .65 fov

6mm 118x 0 .44 fov

 

Another great autumn evening, second night in a row.

 

Out at 715 and viewed Jupiter and powered up to 118x with seldom used 6mm.  GRS was obvious as were four moons, 3 to the east and 1 west.

Saturn was also used at high power, only Titan was visible as twilight was a factor.

 

I turned to NE again and concentrated on Casseopeia again, this time to the south of Schedir or Alpha.  

 

Moved to STT9AC but couldnt pickup the 9.9 mag companion too much twilight.

Moved to STF 16 and was able to split the double.  7.7/8.8, 5.9" @ 41 with white primary star.  Nice triangle formed with one star almost due north.  This was important as circumpolar constellations give me the fits and it is necessary to know the directions.

 

Next was an interesting double ES 42.  The double was easy - 8.4/9.4, 7.1" @ 207 degrees.  What was really interesting was there was a double "W" in the FOV.  ES 42 was the middle star in a large W with a smaller W just to the south.  The southern, smaller W was very uniform in brightness and while both resembled Casseopeia, the smaller stood out better.  A double mini Cass in Cass.  Is that Cass to the 3rd power?

 

Got lost and went to Caph then worked south thru NGC 7789 (last nights journey) to STTA 251 about 8 degrees south of Caph.  This double was quite visible at 27x - .6.9/9.1, 48" @ 209.  There appeared to be a "C" component.  Stelle Doppie confirms the C, but not where I saw it.  Thus it is a line of site star.  The actual C is 11.7 mag and would be a stretch for me.

 

Attempted and failed to see NGC 7801....not enough candles burning.  Moved along the 50 North line and spotted an unidentified double at about the 0h, 04min location just south of two n/s stars.  Need to research it tomorrow. 

 

STF 30 was next.  Yes at 20mm - 7.0/8.9, 13" @ 316.  Brilliant blue color.

 

Lost again.  Back to Alpha Cass and moved south to H5 82.  Wide - 8.0/8.4, 56" @ 75 degrees.  Just to the north is STF 59,about 22' away.  I was able to split this with the seldom used 6mm - glad it was on the tray.  7.2/8.0, 2.4" @ 151.  I believe this is the tightest star I have split.  The wind was strong and didnt help, but the split was obvious.  I moved my eye to allow it to come into focus.

 

BU232 is just south and east of H5 82.  Best view was with 16mm - 8.5/10.1, 24" @ 300.  It forms a nice tight triangle with two other stars, all about 9th mag.

 

I moved east to STT 23 following a trail of stars about 2 degrees from H 5 82 (*which proved to be a very valuable navigational star). STT 23 was very clean at 27x - 8.1/8.6, 14" @ 181.  Very yellow with an orange companion.  Tasty.

 

BU 235 was just south and in same FOV as STT 23, but the companion just vaporized.  Must have been a cloud or shift in transparancy.  I powered up to 9mm - 79 x and spotted it.  7.5/10.8, 44" @ 283.  Funny how it was there with the 20mm and then was lost.

 

Lost again in pursuit of STF 70.  Had to go back to H5 82.  The reason this double was important was that the companion provided navigation to the star hopping.  Remember, I am very confused by circumpolar constellations.  What seems up is really down (east is west, north is south, etc.)

 

I located STF 70 and used the 9mm to view it - 6.3/9.5, 8.1" @ 247.  Wait...there is more!  The C companion was spotted - 11.0 mag, 73" @ 154.  Funny how the seeing shifted a couple of times tonight.

 

Called it quits at 935pm.  Very interesting evening chasing doubles in Cass.

 

T 66, DP 55, H 69.  Wind to 15mph.  Twilight 1 mount was stable for the most part.

 

ed


 

#418 ETXer

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 02:13 PM

Last night was another infrequent opportunity to get the scope out when I was home and a clear sky prevailed. The transparency was excellent in the relatively dry suburban air.

 

My last outing concentrated on Cassiopeia open clusters, and now with Cygnus near the zenith, it was its turn. The ETX-125AT was the scope of choice (still having been set up from last week), this time using the 40mm eyepiece (at 47.5x) to accommodate the large open clusters. They were pretty much observed in order of overall brightness from high to low in accordance with the generated observing plan from tonightssky.com .

 

First off was NGC 6811: overall lovely, spread out with two predominant bright stars accompanied by a double.

 

NGC 7063: A horizontal line of about 8 relatively bright stars bisected toward the right side with a vertical line of about the same number.

 

NGC 7082: Surprisingly bright overall, with a pattern that appeared as a double "arrowhead" with 2 bright stars off to the upper left.

 

NGC 6819: The "Fox-Head Cluster," again, fairly bright, very large, and evenly spread out, filled the entire field of view.

 

IC 4996: Looked what appeared to be vertical upper and lower "lobes," with a small number of brighter stars to the left.

 

NGC 6910: Very large, very bright and overall spectacular; why this one isn't in the Messier catalog is beyond me! My favorite of the evening.

 

NGC 6866: Comparatively dimmer now, evenly spread out except for a significant gap in the center.

 

NGC 7039: Widely spread, with a mix of bright and dim stars, and a visible double.

 

NGC 6834: Evenly distributed, all relatively dim.

 

NGC 6883: Sparse and dim, in a sort-of spiral pattern... very pleasant to look at.

 

NGC 7062: Getting dimmer now, dominated by four brighter stars in a "kite" pattern with dim stars distributed throughout.

 

NGC 7086: Predominantly an upside-down "T" with brighter stars on the bottom.

 

The fact that I was able to see open clusters all the way down to Mag 8.4 was testament to last night's darkness and transparency despite the bright suburban LP.

 

By this time I could hear my wife returning from her chorus practice and I queued up NGC 869/884 in the scope for her to come out and look. That spurred a few nice moments on the patio out under the stars! And my martini was finished, so it was time to pack it in.

 

An outstanding observing evening!

 

Cheers, Allan


 

#419 aeajr

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 04:07 PM

It looks like you should have some good weather Ed. Can't wait to hear how the big dob does in dark skies like that. It should be amazing!

Friday night we're going to make it happen

I'm going to put all other things aside

....

I'm so excited,

I just can't hide it!

I'm about to lose control

And I think I like it!   :D

https://www.youtube....h?v=rQqwG_rQx7A


 

#420 Studly

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 05:22 PM

Friday night we're going to make it happen

I'm going to put all other things aside

....

I'm so excited,

I just can't hide it!

I'm about to lose control

And I think I like it!   laugh.gif

https://www.youtube....h?v=rQqwG_rQx7A

Good luck, man! Can't wait to hear how it turned out.


 

#421 Studly

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Posted 25 September 2019 - 10:22 PM

I finally got a chance to type up my report from Tuesday night:

 

2019-09-024
Time: 21:40 local time (EDT); 01:40 UTC (09-25)
Cloud Cover: About 15%, increasing to about 30%, and variable
Wind: Light to Moderate, variable
Temperature: Approximately 68F
Overall Seeing: Fair due to clouds in area
Length of Observing Session: 2h 30m
Equipment: Orion XT10 Plus (fl 1200mm, f/4.7); Paracorr Type 2 (effective fl 1380)

 

Summary: Few clouds were initially present, and most of those were clinging to the horizon. The forecast was calling for mostly clear skies for most of the night. Since I was able to get an earlier start this time, I decided to use the 10-inch Dob. I employed the Explore Scientific and Meade UWA oculars for this session.

 

Saturn: The ringed planet was plainly visible in the sky, though it was less prominent than earlier in the year when at opposition. At 40mm, the rings were visible. Small but distinct dark gaps were apparent on either side of the planet between it and the rings. The image was shifting focus frequently, though, no doubt due to the proximity of clouds hugging the southern skyline nearby. At 34mm, the image appeared more stable, only shifting focus occasionally. The gaps between the planet and rings were more pronounced. There appeared to be just the barest hint of some coloration on the planet, but it was too indistinct at this magnification to verify. At 30mm, the image grew steadier yet, but no additional detail could be seen. At 24mm, the coloration on the planet resolved into a hint of equatorial cloud banding. This was very subtle, and still not clear enough to verify. At 20mm, the clouds bands became visible. The Cassini Division could *almost* be made out. At 14mm, the Division was verified. A pencil-thin track revealed itself around the outer portion of the rings. Also, the equatorial banding was directly visible, though not well resolved. I think I spotted two of Saturn’s moons—two tiny but steady points of light near the planet. However, this could have been background stars. At 8.8mm, the Cassini Division was quite clear when the image stabilized (which was again becoming an issue at this higher magnification). Careful observations revealed what seemed to be twin bands stretching around the planet. While viewing this, the conditions in the immediate vicinity worsened, causing the image to blur.

 

M17 (Sagittarius): The Omega Nebula was my next target. Though not far from Saturn, the area was clearer. At 40mm, the target was distinct against the background stars. I used the Orion UltraBlock filter to bring out the nebula with good results—the overall shape of the nebula became clearer and easier to make out. The target revealed a denser region of nebulosity, curving around into a hook-like shape of sparser cloud—a very cool effect. At 34mm, more contrast was gained, giving the target an appearance that strongly reminded me of an alligator’s maw!  At 30mm, more detail in the nebula was apparent. Tendrils of wispy cloud appeared to be emanating from the denser regions—an almost otherworldly effect. A few stars could be seen winking in and out of existence within (or behind) the nebula with averted vision. At 24mm, the image seemed to lose a bit of contrast, making the reaches of the nebula a little harder to see. The stars that were seen winking before, however, were directly and constantly visible. At 20mm, the image blurred considerably, and there was a distinct loss of detail. Yep, time to move to a different target.

 

M16 (Serpens): The Eagle Nebula lay nearby, and I wanted to grab a quick look, even if the conditions were not good. At 40mm, I was able to locate the target. However, the clouds moving into the area were dimming the view. I again employed the UltraBlock filter and was rewarded with increased contrast in the nebula. While viewing this, however, the shape of the nebula, which was at first fairly easy to see, became hazy. Alright, I give up—time to try a different section of sky!

 

Double Cluster (Perseus): I moved the scope to the north-northeastern section of the sky to get away from the encroaching clouds. At 40mm, this favorite target did *NOT* disappoint! The bright stars of both clusters almost filled the view—a breathtaking sight! Examining them closely, I was able to again spot the parachute asterism I have noted on previous observations. Very cool. I also observed two reddish-colored stars between the two member clusters. At 34mm, the target completely filled the view. The stars were bright, sharp, and steady—beautiful!

 

NGC 654 & NGC 663 (Cassiopeia): I decided to scan the area around Cassiopeia to see what was available. At 40mm, this pair of targets almost jumped out of the eyepiece at me. Nestled roughly between Epsilon Cass and Rubach, and just to the south, the single view featuring this pair was very pleasing. NGC 654 was the smaller of the two, and almost appeared nebulous in nature at this magnification. NGC 663 was the larger, brighter, and looser cluster, containing at least 20 stars. At 34mm, NGC 654 was resolved, showing the earlier haziness to be a number of closely-packed dim stars, with 2 brighter ones nearby. NGC 663 revealed at least 10 more stars. At 30mm, NGC 654 revealed additional dim stars, with averted vision showing even more. NGC 663 showed about 40 member stars. At 24mm, NGC 654’s dim stars gained more resolution. NGC 663 gained an almost starfish pattern to its stars—a neat effect. At 20mm, NGC 654 could now be seen to contain almost 20 stars. Averted vision revealed at least 5 more. NGC 663 showed dimmer members contained within, revealing a target much more complex in shape and form. At 14mm, NGC 654 gained slightly more resolution. Using averted vision, the number of dim stars contained in the cluster almost doubled—an excellent view! NGC 663 grew even more complex, mostly filling the field. At 8.8mm, however, my luck had run out. The images lost clarity and detail.

 

M103 (Cassiopeia): Clouds were beginning to creep into the area, but I wanted to hit this cluster before the area was engulfed, which meant I had to cut some corners. At 40mm, I was able (finally) to locate the target—I don’t know why I had so much trouble locating this one. The stars of the cluster appeared to be arranged in an almost triangular shape—quite different from most other open clusters. At 30mm, numerous dimmer stars could be seen. I noted one of the more centrally located stars showed a distinct red color. At 20mm, the entire cluster became better resolved, revealed additional dim members within. At 8.8mm, the image grew much softer—clouds were beginning to interfere.

 

M31/M32/M101 (Andromeda): Moving again to a cloud-free section of the sky, I decided to hit this favored trio. At 40mm, the three galaxies could all clearly be seen in a single field. M31 showed a bright, almost star-like fuzzy core, with wide-reaching arms spread out to either side—beautiful! The core also had an asymmetrical quality, appearing brighter on one side. M32 showed up as a large fuzzy star, but definitely not a star! M110 was a faint but present smudge, almost appearing as an irregular galaxy in shape. At 30mm, M31 was bright and clear. With averted vision, some structure could be seen, and a dust lane could just be made out. M32 and M110 still fit into the single field, but only just. M32 was still fairly clear, but M110 seemed a little dimmed and harder to see. At 20mm, the view actually seemed to improve. No additional details were apparent in M31, but M32 and M110 were better resolved. At 14mm, M31 revealed some very slight density variations within, in the form of an apparent gradient in brightness moving toward the core. M32 was brighter and seemed on the cusp of showing some internal variation. M110 now showed a hint of a somewhat flattened shape.

 

M45 (Taurus): The conditions were growing worse, and at least 30% of the sky was covered in some form of clouds or haze. However, I wanted to get my first decent look at The Pleiades this season. At 40mm, the target showed a field full of bright, blue stars! Absolutely beautiful. I tried using the UltraBlock filter, and contrary to what I expected, it did actually seem to reveal a very small amount of nebulosity around the brighter stars. It was subtle, but it was definitely there. With averted vision, the effect was slightly enhanced.

 

Conclusion: Well, it has actually been a while since I have been able to get out with my Dob, and for such a lengthy session. It felt good. I often forget how much light that thing gathers when I don’t use it for a while! The targets were brighter and clearer (conditions notwithstanding) than in my other scopes. I hope that another such opportunity will present itself before the weather gets too cold to truly enjoy it!

 

 

Until next time!


 

#422 MrRipley

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 12:50 AM

Hello everyone from Deep in the Heart of Texas!  I'm relatively new to CN and I thought I'd post my first "official" observation report from this evening. 

 

Session 1

Date: 9/25/19

Time: 2145-0000

Temp: 81 degrees (this is South Texas!)

Humidity: 61%

Cloud cover: initially high level only but becoming a bit more widespread by session's end

 

Equipment: Apertura AD8 Dobsonian

EP: 30 mm Super View 2 inch (68 degrees); 9 mm Plossl 1.25 inch (52 degrees)

Telrad

 

This is actually my third session with this scope but the first where I decided to start keeping records. The main goal of this session was to become familiar with the Telrad which just arrived at my door this afternoon. Anything I can do to make finding targets easier is welcome as I fight with the scope (having trouble getting the hang of the delicate adjustments to the OTA during viewing) and dry eyes with contact lenses (read that glasses and bad astigmatism make viewing harder but I'm starting to wonder...). 

 

Just as I was getting set up my neighbors arrived home from an outing and proceeded to pollute the immediate environment around between us with bright light from their garage so I turned to the south and got a good look at Saturn with both eye pieces. Nice clean separation of the rings (in total) from the planet. I'd like to say I saw a few moons but since Saturn was relatively low in the sky, my OTA was sitting at a very low angle and this is where I tend to have the most problems achieving balance. Thus I found it difficult to keep the planet centered and there was too much movement of the scope with the 8 mph or so breeze (per the weather people). Need to play around with that a bit more. Moved on to get a quick look at Jupiter before it ducked below the treeline. It was about this time that I figured out I had the Telrad on the OTA facing the wrong direction (doh!). (I was using the finderscope to locate the planets and started playing around with the Telrad when I found my mistake.) Moving on...

 

The scope is much more stable approaching vertical so I took in Vega, Deneb, Altair. Found the Double Double but couldn't keep it centered long enough with the breeze to get a closer look with the 9mm. Traced out the Northern Cross and got my first look at Albireo split into its gold and indigo components. Beautiful!

 

Hopped over to Cassiopeia and thought I'd try to locate M31. After work late one evening I was fairly certain I located it with my 25x70 binos but I had never tried to find it with the AD8. The Telrad made locating Mirach very easy and then it was a quick hop over to M31. A grayish blob with a hint of a central glow. Awesome! Dropped down to Almach to see the two components there (I thought the dominant yellow star far outshone the much dimmer blue one.) They seemed separated by more distance than I expected from what I saw in Sky Safari. 

 

The rest of the session was spent tracing out the "W" in Cassiopeia: starting from the south with Ruchbach (side trip east to the Owl Cluster) and moving up through Gamma Cassiopeia (Navi), Shedar, and Caph. By this point I felt more comfortable with the Telrad though my neck and back are not going to be pleased with me in the morning. I have a riser arriving later this week so maybe that will help. I think the Telrad is well worth it however. 

 

Any tips from other Dob owners out there for keeping the scope steady while viewing? The wind was a definite issue and always will be where I live. I was out in my driveway completely exposed with no windbreak at all. My last session out was on my back porch which offered the advantage of protection from the house around me and no neighbor lights so I may be spending more time back there in the future. Big downside there is that I'm pretty much stuck with NE and E skies. 

 

Overall a productive session for a newbie like me. Plan to write out a target list for the next session so I can spend my time in one or two areas only.  I really appreciate the reports others post here. Obviously I'm still in the infancy of my skills but the veterans out there give me reason to hope!

 

Clear skies!


 

#423 aeajr

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 05:58 AM

Welcome MrRipley!

We are so pleased you decided to join our happy family of observers.  Are you new to astronomy or just new to this telescope?

 

I too am a driveway observer most of the time.  I have tremendous light pollution issues, but I just deal with it.  wink.gif   Northeast and East are my darkest and best observing directions.  My southern and western skies are almost blank, except for the planets and a handful of bright stars.

 

The good thing about observing to the NE, east and SE is that that is where things rise, so if you plan your session by the clock you can observe things as they come into a good observing position, say above 30 degrees.   As the season progresses, most things will come into view so plan your targets according to what is rising in the east at the time you want to observe.  Obviously you need to look to the South for the planets. 

 

I see you have the AD8. Excellent choice. I have the AD12. I just added a telrad to mine too.

Really good report. We look forward to your future reports.

 

Balance can be an issue as you go from large to small eyepieces, add finders, etc.  Just a few thoughts.

 

  • The balance point on an AD8 can be adjusted.  Check to make sure you set the left and right altitude bearings to the same and correct position according to the instructions.
  • There are two tension adjustments.  I make the far side one fairly tight and use the near side one to make my fine adjustments.

I have larger and heavier eyepieces than you, so keeping the scope in balance does present some challenges as I switch around.  This is a technique I learned with my Orion XT8, before I got the AD12.  Magnets!

 

Sometimes, rather than cranking down hard on the tension dials, which can make the alt adjustment a bit stiff, I use groups of small magnets to help keep the scope in balance.   

https://www.harborfr...=ceramic magnet

 

I have them in pairs, wrapped in duct tape so they won't damage the paint.   When I don't need them I place them over the pivot point and they have not effect on balance.  When I put a heavy eyepiece in, or if I am viewing at a low angle I may slide 2, 4, 6 or more of them toward the mirror to help keep the scope in balance.   Not fancy, but it is cheap, easy and quick and it works.

 

If you decide to try this, I suggest 4 pairs to start.  They are cheap and available in crafts stores too.  They weigh about 3.5 oz per pair.   Total I think I have 8 pairs on my AD12.   I also use them for other things, but they are great for dynamic balance adjustment.   I just leave them attached to the scope all the time. 

 

Clearly you can use other magnets but this is what I use and am very happy with the results. 

 

Wind will always be a problem.  Note that you can adjust the AZ tension using the knob on the base, under the tube, if the scope seems to swing side to side a bit too easily.

 

Tip:

Top right of the screen you will see your screen name with a little down arrow.
Go to My Settings.  This is where you can make a number of changes.

SIGNATURE:   I recommend you create a signature (my settings)
where you can list your telescope your eyepieces or whatever you wish.  My
signature is at the bottom of this post.  A signature helps people help you
because they know what you have.  We get a lot of requests from people
saying, "I am new, what things should I get?"   Now we play 20 questions
to find out what telescope they have, what eyepieces they already own, etc..

 

This helps people help you.  Just a suggestion.

 

Again, welcome!


Edited by aeajr, 26 September 2019 - 06:32 AM.

 

#424 MP173

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 06:48 AM

Mr. Ripley:

Great initial report.  You will not be disappointed with the view to the Northeast.  Those lights can really be an issue with observing.  

 

Ed has great advise for using the dobs and eyepieces.

 

Ed


 

#425 MP173

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  • Joined: 30 Oct 2015

Posted 26 September 2019 - 06:56 AM

No optics today, other than my two eyes.

 

Was up early and took a walk at 515 to get these arthritic hips moving.  What a view.  Clear skys and very few lights on in our neighborhood.

 

Orion dominating to the south, Sirius and Canis Major to the SE, Taurus overhead, with Gemini following.  Auriga also overhead.

 

To the east the moon was near Regulus, the dark portion of the moon quite obvious.

 

Amazing view.  Cant wait to either get outside early with the scope or evening views.

 

Ed


 


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