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#26 csa/montana

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:48 AM

 

 Any possibility of "pinning" the old thread so it can be readily referenced?  Lots of data and observation logs in that.

Since there is a link to the old thread in Part 2; probably not.  Administration wishes to keep the "pinned" threads down to a minimum.


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#27 Migwan

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:52 AM

8/19/19,  22:00-01:00 67°,   RH 65%,  wind calm,  SQM 20.41,  Bortle 5,  Clear Sky; Transparency 3/5, Seeing 3/5 expected improvement for both after 01:00.   GOES East shows mid blue moving into area.

Yep, out 2 nights apart with good conditions.  This time, before everybody’s second love, Luna, got to high.   Clear Sky suggested better seeing at dark site, but for dearest, I stayed home.   Must say, transparency seemed better than given.

 

Targets;   Jupiter, Saturn, M51a&b, M31/32/110, NGC6826, NGC7662

 

Started off with Jupiter.  Not much happening at first.  Though I don’t dispute seeing, features were not as clear as I had hope for.  It is definitely low, but I could not see much shimmering.  I went off to Saturn and M51 and then came back later.   At that time there was a knot on the North Equatorial band near the right edge.  Being a little daft, it took me a bit to realize it was a shadow transit.  The edges of the shadow were fuzzy or not well defined.  Highest useful mags was 230x with CPC and E13.  I compared that to a 17Plossl with the base of a shorty barlow attached (1.5x).  Pretty dark and some color lost.

 

Saturn was a bit sharper than Jupiter, though highest useful magnification was unchanged.  The usual banding, pole and Cassini Division were visible.   As with Jupiter, I left for M51 and came back later.  Did not see any change in detail on return.

 

M51 a&b is sliding off to west now.   Caught at around 45° and at 200x (CPC & barlowed APM30) could clearly see the extent of spiral arms and involvement between a&b.  Was unable to spy spiral arms clearly in either direct or averted vision.  I was able to to see them in partial by moving my eye back and forth from the EP.  Not very effective as I could never see much of the whole by doing this.  I switched off the power switch (barlow), but could not pick the arms up with this or averted technique. 

 

M31/32/110 initial view demonstrated the power of our dear lady Luna.  Washed the heck out.  Could easily M31 core and M32, but M110 was absent.  I powered up the ST120 with E13 (46x 1.76°) and couldn’t find it.  Also looked for it thru CPC with APM30 (100x .9°) and also failed to find it. 

 

Moved on to NGC 6826 Blinking Planetary which was just west of zenith which is best part of home skies.  Very sharp image and was able to take it to 333 & 666x (CPC, M9mm & power switch barlow).  At this point I would say that seeing was definitely up to 4/5, if not better while transparency was at least 3/5.  The dwarf as sharp, but was having trouble seeing any internal structure even with averted vision.  I played at this for quite some time and was finally able to pull some structure in with my non dominant left eye by moving the nebula just right of center and looking just left of the object.  Felt that I could probably sketch the entire edge of the outer structure and the left edge of the inner structure.  The remainder of the inner structure faded in and out and was too indefinite to think that could be sketched.   I tried the same technique with the right eye, going back and forth between them till finally I did see some structure with the right eye, though never quite as well as with the left eye.   Odd?

 

Lastly I looked at NGC7662.  Still unable to spy dwarf, but was able to see some slight internal structure with left eye and given technique.  Was unable to spy that structure with right eye and never got enough definition to think it could be sketched.  Just fading in and out too much.  Mostly out. 

 

Seems that Phils cosmic Challenge to see the spiral arms of M51 have really helped my viewing abilities. More effort does correspond to better results. 

 

Good night.   Would have been even better if I could have found Posidonius.  Hope I didn’t miss an episode. question.gif  smile.gif

jd


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#28 trapdoor2

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 10:12 AM

I recently received a pair of 10X50 wide angle binos from Orion. https://www.telescop...2160/p/9333.uts

 

These things are the nutz. Unfortunately, I haven't had much in the way of clear skies here. Just a few short and shaky observations of Jupiter, Saturn (peachy color easily seen, looking elongated, etc.), etc., eye wateringly bright moon views. I have got to get a tripod adapter...

 

However, last night around 11pm, I got out and was able to rest the binoculars on the fence, peering at both Saturn and Jupiter and waiting for my eyes to dark adapt. Next door neighbor has the whole neighborhood lit up with yellow bulbs but I found a small bit of shadow next to the fence.

 

I had been thinking about binocular targets and had decided I ought to be able to see M22 from my location. I knew it was about 2/3 the way from Saturn to the lid of the teapot (lambda Sagitterii) and that there is a small triangle of stars just to the SW of M22. I think there was some haze involved in my 'seeing' but I kept at it. Either my eyes finally went to full dilation or the haze left me an opening...because suddenly the little triangle of stars became quite bright and a large fuzzy globular started to glow in my averted vision. M22!

 

Of course, I lost one of the eyepiece covers. I was out this morning trying to find it. I imagine Rocket (pyrenees mix) will find it...it will be a mangled bit of plastic if I ever see it again.

 

Still, an amazing 20 minutes of viewing for me. I'm very pleased with these binos!


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#29 Studly

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 12:12 PM

I recently received a pair of 10X50 wide angle binos from Orion. https://www.telescop...2160/p/9333.uts

 

These things are the nutz. Unfortunately, I haven't had much in the way of clear skies here. Just a few short and shaky observations of Jupiter, Saturn (peachy color easily seen, looking elongated, etc.), etc., eye wateringly bright moon views. I have got to get a tripod adapter...

 

However, last night around 11pm, I got out and was able to rest the binoculars on the fence, peering at both Saturn and Jupiter and waiting for my eyes to dark adapt. Next door neighbor has the whole neighborhood lit up with yellow bulbs but I found a small bit of shadow next to the fence.

 

I had been thinking about binocular targets and had decided I ought to be able to see M22 from my location. I knew it was about 2/3 the way from Saturn to the lid of the teapot (lambda Sagitterii) and that there is a small triangle of stars just to the SW of M22. I think there was some haze involved in my 'seeing' but I kept at it. Either my eyes finally went to full dilation or the haze left me an opening...because suddenly the little triangle of stars became quite bright and a large fuzzy globular started to glow in my averted vision. M22!

 

Of course, I lost one of the eyepiece covers. I was out this morning trying to find it. I imagine Rocket (pyrenees mix) will find it...it will be a mangled bit of plastic if I ever see it again.

 

Still, an amazing 20 minutes of viewing for me. I'm very pleased with these binos!

Very nice! Thanks for the report.


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#30 trapdoor2

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 12:38 PM

I recently received a pair of 10X50 wide angle binos from Orion. https://www.telescop...2160/p/9333.uts

 

 

Still, an amazing 20 minutes of viewing for me. I'm very pleased with these binos!

 

Post scriptum...

 

I dug out my old camera tripod. I had forgotten how pitiful it was. Very wiggly, doesn't get above 5 feet, crank broken off. It is going in the trash.

 

I ordered 2 new lens covers from Orion @ $0.99ea, Tripod adapter for binos @ $19.99 and a new heavy-duty tripod for $99.99. Free shipping!

 

Not ten minutes after hitting the order button, I found the missing lens cap peeking out from under a chair in the kitchen. No idea how it got there. Now I will have a backup set.smirk.gif 


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#31 brentknight

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 01:27 PM

I've found a good zero gravity chair works better with 10x50's than a tripod. I may not be able to hold them as steady, but my neck thanks me in the morning...
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#32 trapdoor2

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 02:54 PM

I've found a good zero gravity chair works better with 10x50's than a tripod. I may not be able to hold them as steady, but my neck thanks me in the morning...

I wish I could do that. If I sit down, I reduce my little window into the sky considerably. In order to see things along the ecliptic (and above), I have to be standing. This is one of the reasons I haven't bought a Dob (yet).

 

After Dec 31, I'll have a little lower horizons, a broader sweep and less "neighborly" light pollution. A good chair will be very useful there...if I can find an XXXL version. grin.gif 


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#33 The Luckster

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 03:17 PM

I am dipping my toe into OIII filter territory, it only seems the logical step given my continued love of wide-field.

 

I tell you, I agonized for days in trying to decide on an OIII 1.25" filter, or the 2", regarding my current rigs and accessories.  Then I had a "I should have known this" moment; get the 2" filter then screw it on the 2" diagonal, then I can use my 1.25" oculars (within the needs of FoV and exit pupil).  DUUUUUH!

 

CS

 

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#34 aeajr

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 04:13 PM

I can't wait for some clear sky.

 

Just received my new ES 82 4.7 mm.   Now I need a clear sky so I can use it.

 

Keep those reports coming!


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#35 brentknight

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 05:02 PM

Ed,

That ES looks like a really nice eyepiece. I have no doubt you've probably taken out 3 nearby states with bad weather now. I'll blame my bad weather on it too if you don't mind...
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#36 brentknight

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 05:07 PM

Which 2" filter did you get, Jason?

I'm looking at either the Thousand Oaks or the TeleVue H-beta or save up a little longer for an 8mm Ethos.
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#37 The Luckster

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 05:29 PM

Which 2" filter did you get, Jason?

I'm looking at either the Thousand Oaks or the TeleVue H-beta or save up a little longer for an 8mm Ethos.

 

Umm, I'm rather embarrassed to say, I went cheap.  However, cheapies I've purchased from this manufacturer in the past have performed very well.  Conclusion: if this budget OIII improves some views, I can always sell it and upgrade later.

 

This one, at this price, shipped:

 

https://www.svbony.com/2-inch-SV115

 

CS

 

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#38 aeajr

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 07:34 PM

Ed,

That ES looks like a really nice eyepiece. I have no doubt you've probably taken out 3 nearby states with bad weather now. I'll blame my bad weather on it too if you don't mind...

Absolutely.  I am going on two straight weeks of clouds. 


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#39 MP173

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 08:18 PM

I have not been out with scope for 2 weeks (Aug 6th).  

 

Did spend a few minutes Sunday night with 7x35 wide angles and cruised around....easily located M31.  Cant wait to turn the new AT102Ed on it.  

 

Cant believe how much the skys have changed in two short weeks.  

 

Ed


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#40 TheBigK

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:42 PM

I can't wait for some clear sky.

 

Just received my new ES 82 4.7 mm.   Now I need a clear sky so I can use it.

 

Keep those reports coming!

Ed, I'm thinking about ordering that lens before the sale ends, so you need get a really really big fan and blow those clouds away so I can get your report before I buy it!


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#41 aeajr

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 06:33 AM

Oh, there is no question that I will love it.  I really enjoy the other ES 82s I have.  But this will be 325X in my AD12 Dob so likely I won't be able to use it every night.

 

I had a Meade HD60 4.5 for my XT8, 266X, but could use it so rarely that I sold it and usually just barlowed the BH zoom.  But in this scope I think I will be able to use that high power more often, based on the larger aperture.  


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#42 mikerepp

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 06:47 AM

Ed hope you enjoy that 4.7 as much as I do its my most used EP in the AT115.



#43 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 12:58 PM

Aug 19-20

 

I got my scope out for the first time in a while and kept it set up in the yard till 11:00p  last evening. I spent more time hopping and hunting the zenith than viewing time. Sirius Vega to the double double, I thought would split them and zoomed in with my TV 6-3mm (183x) with no success.  Adding a powermate did not even help at 458x! Aside from impossible magnification, humid air and possibly the wrong pair I was disappointed as I even had to sit on the patio. Demanding, these stars. 

 

Many attempts at hopping to the ring nebula eventually got me got me there and I enjoyed 26mm, 8mm and 6-3mm views. Rather hazy floating in and out of focus but undeniably a structured ring with a dark centre and what seemed to be two slightly different inner and outer looks to the ring itself. I was fairly well dark adapted by this point so I can't say with any certainty that it was a colour difference. 

 

Tried for for a few targets in Cygnus next.   GC6888 the Crescent nebula looked like an interesting target in SkySafari but that was not happening. North American nebula as well although I knew that was most likely out of reach. 

 

I turned to Andromeda and perceived the core quite brightly without anything but a hint of the outer structure. The double cluster was just clearing the roof line and I had a fine viewing. 

 

The moon was promising an appearance and I spent some time viewing Theophilus near the terminator. Apollo 11 was nearby but Aldrin, Collin's and Armstrong were not viewable through the trees at a low altitude. 

 

Last night I tried for M101 & M51 with no luck at all as it was a tad soupy.  M13 was a nice sight at a range of magnifications showing as a distinct fuzzy edged diffuse ball interspersed with waves of smeary pin points of stars throughout. Finally M92 graced my view with a lucky sweep search before hopping to. A nice grey orb with no star sign. The sky washed out with a thin blanket of cloud pulling the covers over the area before the moon half cleared the tree line. 

 

An enjoyable couple of nights regardless. 

 

Edit: Modified star field to normal. (Sirius - Vega)


Edited by B l a k S t a r, 21 August 2019 - 04:24 PM.

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#44 aeajr

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 03:48 PM

Aug 19-20

 

I got my scope out for the first time in a while and kept it set up in the yard till 11:00p  last evening. I spent more time hopping and hunting the zenith than viewing time. Sirius to the double double, I thought would split them and zoomed in with my TV 6-3mm (183x) with no success.  Adding a powermate did not even help at 458x! Aside from impossible magnification, humid air and possibly the wrong pair I was disappointed as I even had to sit on the patio. Demanding, these stars. 

 

snip...

The Double Double, I presume refers to Epsilon Lyrae, near Vega.   I usually had to go to about 220x to get a clean split on those.  

 

Or are you talking about splitting Sirius to A and B?  Not sure what I have used to do that. 


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#45 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 04:21 PM

Whoa! I seem to have switched stars, it was the lyrical harpiness of the Vega region of course. 

I shall correct that - thanks Ed!

 

edit:  a Sirius mistake corrected ; )


Edited by B l a k S t a r, 22 August 2019 - 01:58 AM.

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#46 BFaucett

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 07:52 AM

Date:  Wednesday  Aug 21, 2019  |  Time:  approx  1:30 AM – 2:30 AM  CDT
Weather:  Temp 80 F | Humidity 94% | Mostly clear
Scope:  Celestron C90 Mak  (FL = 1250 mm)
Eyepiece(s):  Meade 8-24 mm Zoom
Target:  The Moon  (Waning gibbous - 70%)
Filter(s):  none
 
 
On this episode of Looney Talk with Lunatic Bob, we’ll visit the Alps and the Alpine Valley but we’re not talking about Switzerland!  We’ll also visit the craters Plato, Cassini, and Aristillus.  Plus, we’ll have a special visitor towards the end of the show.  That’s all next, right here on KNGC 90.1 FM “The Mighty Mak.”
 
I’ve been reading an introductory book for Moon observers and ran across an interesting section about the Alps (Montes Alpes) mountain range, which is near Plato, so I thought I’d check it out.  Montes Alpes was named after the Alps in Europe.  I found this intriguing as way back in 1968 I was at the visitor’s center near the summit of Mount Pilatus in Switzerland taking in the view.  It was another clear night so I grabbed my C90 Mak and set up on my patio as usual. 
 
Plato is easy to locate and I soon had it in my FOV at 52x.  I’ve always found Plato to be interesting as it has so few craters or craterlets on its floor.  In the mirror reversed image, I could see some mountains to the left of Plato.  I went up to 156x and zeroed in on the Alps mountain range.   The mountains really do stand out in the view.  The Alpine Valley cuts through the middle of the mountain range as can be seen in the attached photos.  I could see some hills to the left of the mountain range but I was not able to see any of the rilles shown in the photos.  Mount Blanc, which is located within the Alps, is about 3.7 km in height.
 
I also checked out the craters Cassini and Aristillus.  The two craters inside Cassini were very distinct and I also saw the mountains at the center of Aristillus.  The mare below Plato has several mountains that are of interest.  Mons Piton and Mons Pico really stand out.  Both are over 2 km in height. 
 
It was just another simple but enjoyable session of observing the Moon.
 
Oh yeah… I almost forgot.  One of my regular visitors, along with the rest of the family, stopped by earlier in the evening before I started my observing session.  I think he was curious about my telescope!  See pic below.
 
Cheers and remember to keep looking up!  Bob F. smile.gif 
 
 

The location of crater Plato and the Alps:

  

gallery_230527_11735_16812.jpg
  

  

The following images are reversed left to right to match the view in my scope:
  

gallery_230527_11735_150360.jpg
   

gallery_230527_11735_95751.jpg
     

gallery_230527_11735_937.jpg

  
  

My distinguished visitor:  smile.gif

   

gallery_230527_10913_840137.jpg  
   
https://en.wikipedia...ki/Montes_Alpes
https://en.wikipedia...ki/Vallis_Alpes
https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Mons_Piton
https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Mons_Pico
https://en.wikipedia...nt_Blanc_(Moon)
https://en.wikipedia.../Plato_(crater)
https://en.wikipedia..._(lunar_crater)
https://en.wikipedia...tillus_(crater)

  


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#47 SeaBee1

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 08:03 AM

Nice session, Bob!

 

Man, I gotta get out more...

 

Clear skies!

 

CB


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#48 Migwan

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 09:32 AM

That one's uncle visits me on nights I am out at home.  Comes around and talks to me while snacking under the apple tree and bird feeder.   He also likes to climb the shepherd hook and raid the hummingbird feeder.  

 

I put a 3" stovepipe baffle up, but after a couple of nights the butterball managed to climb up that too.  Sprayed Pam on the baffle, which only worked for a couple of nights.  Though I am so far defeated, I do have to admire his tenacity.  

 

jd

 

Never thought about asking him if he wanted a peek.


Edited by Migwan, 22 August 2019 - 09:34 AM.

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#49 Studly

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 11:30 AM

Date:  Wednesday  Aug 21, 2019  |  Time:  approx  1:30 AM – 2:30 AM  CDT
Weather:  Temp 80 F | Humidity 94% | Mostly clear
Scope:  Celestron C90 Mak  (FL = 1250 mm)
Eyepiece(s):  Meade 8-24 mm Zoom
Target:  The Moon  (Waning gibbous - 70%)
Filter(s):  none
 
 
On this episode of Looney Talk with Lunatic Bob, we’ll visit the Alps and the Alpine Valley but we’re not talking about Switzerland!  We’ll also visit the craters Plato, Cassini, and Aristillus.  Plus, we’ll have a special visitor towards the end of the show.  That’s all next, right here on KNGC 90.1 FM “The Mighty Mak.”
 
I’ve been reading an introductory book for Moon observers and ran across an interesting section about the Alps (Montes Alpes) mountain range, which is near Plato, so I thought I’d check it out.  Montes Alpes was named after the Alps in Europe.  I found this intriguing as way back in 1968 I was at the visitor’s center near the summit of Mount Pilatus in Switzerland taking in the view.  It was another clear night so I grabbed my C90 Mak and set up on my patio as usual. 
 
Plato is easy to locate and I soon had it in my FOV at 52x.  I’ve always found Plato to be interesting as it has so few craters or craterlets on its floor.  In the mirror reversed image, I could see some mountains to the left of Plato.  I went up to 156x and zeroed in on the Alps mountain range.   The mountains really do stand out in the view.  The Alpine Valley cuts through the middle of the mountain range as can be seen in the attached photos.  I could see some hills to the left of the mountain range but I was not able to see any of the rilles shown in the photos.  Mount Blanc, which is located within the Alps, is about 3.7 km in height.
 
I also checked out the craters Cassini and Aristillus.  The two craters inside Cassini were very distinct and I also saw the mountains at the center of Aristillus.  The mare below Plato has several mountains that are of interest.  Mons Piton and Mons Pico really stand out.  Both are over 2 km in height. 
 
It was just another simple but enjoyable session of observing the Moon.
 
Oh yeah… I almost forgot.  One of my regular visitors, along with the rest of the family, stopped by earlier in the evening before I started my observing session.  I think he was curious about my telescope!  See pic below.
 
Cheers and remember to keep looking up!  Bob F. smile.gif 
 
 

The location of crater Plato and the Alps:

  

gallery_230527_11735_16812.jpg
  

  

The following images are reversed left to right to match the view in my scope:
  

gallery_230527_11735_150360.jpg
   

gallery_230527_11735_95751.jpg
     

gallery_230527_11735_937.jpg

  
  

My distinguished visitor:  smile.gif

   

gallery_230527_10913_840137.jpg  
   
https://en.wikipedia...ki/Montes_Alpes
https://en.wikipedia...ki/Vallis_Alpes
https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Mons_Piton
https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Mons_Pico
https://en.wikipedia...nt_Blanc_(Moon)
https://en.wikipedia.../Plato_(crater)
https://en.wikipedia..._(lunar_crater)
https://en.wikipedia...tillus_(crater)

I find myself repeatedly drawn to that entire area between and around Plato and Sinus Iridum. The topography is rich and extremely interesting. Nice report!


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#50 jklein

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 04:18 PM

Date:  Wednesday  Aug 21, 2019  |  Time:  approx  1:30 AM – 2:30 AM  CDT
Weather:  Temp 80 F | Humidity 94% | Mostly clear
Scope:  Celestron C90 Mak  (FL = 1250 mm)
Eyepiece(s):  Meade 8-24 mm Zoom
Target:  The Moon  (Waning gibbous - 70%)
Filter(s):  none
 
 
 

Careful - that little critter will be borrowing eyepieces before long.......


  • JHollJr, BFaucett, SeaBee1 and 1 other like this


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