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#51 TheBigK

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 09:20 PM

I've been able to get out with the telescope 4 times between last Friday and Tuesday. First night was very short and 2 of the other sessions were pretty short as well. Didn't get out last night and won't get out tonight. Clear skies, but too tired. I will be going out tomorrow night for as long as I can though...will go in when I either get too tired or when it clouds up. Tomorrow night I'll probably view a combination of globular clusters, open clusters, and planetery nebula...possibly some double stars later in the night once the moon rises.

 

 

Without further delay, here you go...

 

Telescope - Orion XT10i

Finderscope - Stellarvue 50mm, 9x, 5.8 FOV

Eyepieces:

Paracorr Type 2 (used at all times)

ES30mm - 46x, 1.78 FOV

Nagler 12mm, Type 4  - 115x, 0.71 FOV

Zhumell 6mm - 230x, 0.24 FOV

 

 

Session 1
Friday, August 16, 2019 9:55-10:08pm
Really short since it clouded up on me almost immediately.

 

STF2615 - Initially split with thre 30 then dropped the 12. Per SD, this is not a physical double. Shoot, clouds already rolling in.

 

STF2612 - Made out thre AB pair, but couldn't make out the C component before the stupid clouds rolled in.

 

 

Session 2

Saturday, August 17, 2019 8:31-10:59pm

 

STF2544 - Made out the A,B, and C stars shown on SD. AB pair is uncertain, C not physical.

 

STF2543 - Best view was with the 12. SD shows it being uncertain nature.

 

STF2566 - Not a physical double. Nice split with the 12mm. Main star had a definite orange coloring. Beautiful looking double.

 

STF2532 - Another nice orange main star. Can see the A, B, and C components, but not the D. Used the 12 and the 6. Not a physical system.

 

A2197 - AB and AC both made out. The AC is an STF double per SD. Used the 6 and can just see the 13th mag start 6. I probably wouldn't have seen it if it was much further away.

 

STF2513 - Can just split it with the 12. Uncertain double per SD.

 

STF2492 (23 Aquila) - This one is a physical double. Split with the 12. Tried for the C component but couldn't see it.

 

STFA40 - Made out the AB and BD components. Could not see the C star. Uncertain double. Used the 6mm.

 

STFA40 (24 Aquila) - Kind of a part of the previous double.

 

STF2497 - Not a physical double, but beautiful in the 30. Nice wide double.

 

STF2498 - Quadruple system. AB are physical, AC uncertain, AD not physical. Looked really nice in the 12.

 

STF2462 - Made out the A, B, and D components. Cannot see the C. Best view was with the 6.

 

STF2833 - Split first with the 30 then with the 12. Easy in both. This is a physical double.

 

STF2831 - Another physical double. Can just make out the B component in the 30. Easier in the 12. Fairly wide separation. B at just about N.

 

ST2848 - Beautiful near equal magnitude physical double star. Looked great in the 12. Looks like clouds are rolling in from the coast, so will be cutting this session short soon. But I will enjoy a nice glass of Scotch after.

 

STF2856 - Uncertain double. Close, but split with the 6mm.

 

STF2878 - Saw all 3 components with the 6. AB was a close split.

 

 

Session 3
Sunday, August 18, 2019 8:45-9:35pm
Short session as I have work and the kids have school in the morning. Focus was on carbon stars from the AL Carbon Star list.

 

(X Sagittae) - Carbon star. Very red in color. Beautiful. Best view was with the 12.

 

(BF Sagittae) - Another carbon star, this one is more orange than red. Major around 9. Best view was with the 12, but also viewed with the 30.

 

HD198269 (Carbon star) - This carbon star is less red than prior one, light orange coloring. Viewed with the 12mm.

 

HD201626 (Carbon star) - Another carbon star. Light orange coloring. Best view was again with the 12mm.

 

(RS Cygni) - Pretty deep red coloring to this one. I liked the view in both the 30 and 12. Adding this as a favorite.

 

(AX Cygni) - This carbon star is a stunning red color! Definite favorite! Viewed with the 12.

 

(SV Cygni) - Another red colored carbon star. Not quite as deeply red colored as the previous one, but close.

 

M39 - Very nice open cluster in Cygnus. Nice view with the 30 where I can keep it nicely framed.

 

NGC7082 - First time seeing this open cluster. Viewed with the 30 first, but too much going on outside of the cluster so I viewed with the 12mm which framed it a little better.

 

 

Session 4
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 8:31-9:25pm
Another short session...work and school. Focus was mostly on open clusters with a globular cluster thrown in. 

 

M71 - Can see a scatter of stars in the c, but not seeing a whole lot. Not a lot of fuzziness to this one. The more I look, the more stars pop out. Using the 6 to get as much magnification as I can.

 

NGC6802 - Very loose cluster with only a few stars seen. Viewed with both the 12 and the 6. Keystone pattern obvious in both with a couple stars in the middle.

 

Coathanger - I had to look away the Coathanger while in the area. Hard not to view it since it was right on the finder... which I'd the best view of it.

 

NGC6823 - About 10 or so stars resolved with both the 6 and the 12. Slightly tighter than the previous OC I just viewed.

 

NGC6834 - Resolved about 25 stars in the cluster. It filled up most of the fov of the 6mm. Also viewed with the 12, but not as many stars were resolved.

 

NGC6885 - Very nice non Messier open cluster. Best framing of this one was with the 30mm. Counted between 25 and 30 stars.

 

NGC6940 - I think I'll add this one to my favorites list. A lot of very faint stars popping in and out with the 30mm. Put the 12 in and the cluster filled the view. I didn't even try to count the stars... too many. I can only imagine what this would look like in a dark skies area.


Edited by TheBigK, 22 August 2019 - 09:20 PM.

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#52 JHollJr

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 05:35 AM

That one's uncle visits me on nights I am out at home.  Comes around and talks to me while snacking under the apple tree and bird feeder.   He also likes to climb the shepherd hook and raid the hummingbird feeder.  

 

I put a 3" stovepipe baffle up, but after a couple of nights the butterball managed to climb up that too.  Sprayed Pam on the baffle, which only worked for a couple of nights.  Though I am so far defeated, I do have to admire his tenacity.  

 

jd

 

Never thought about asking him if he wanted a peek.

I must be the only one who doesn’t appreciate the visiting raccoons while I’m observing. I find that I get distracted watching what they are up to. They never come around alone, but always three or four. They have been harmless enough, but they bother me.


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#53 aeajr

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:39 AM

I will be presenting at the Custer Observatory this weekend.  After the presentation I am planning to go outside with a laser pointer and do a little sky tour for the public.   The forecast has been poor for weeks, but there is a glimmer of hope for Saturday night.  

 

Keep your fingers crossed for me to have a good sky.


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#54 The Luckster

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:31 PM

I must be the only one who doesn’t appreciate the visiting raccoons while I’m observing. I find that I get distracted watching what they are up to. They never come around alone, but always three or four. They have been harmless enough, but they bother me.

 

I would not like some wild critters around me whilst peering through an ocular at night.

 

So, chalk one up for the Bortle 5.5 observatory known as my balcony!

 

 

Oh yeah, my ES82 24 came today from Astronomics, so, West Coast observers you can expect cloudy conditions this evening...sorry.  wink.gif

 

CS (not tonight west coast)

 

jason


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#55 Studly

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:33 PM

I made some brief observations tonight. Conditions were terrible, though, so I came away from it rather disappointed:

 

2019-08-23
Time: 22:20 local time (EDT); 02:20 UTC (08-24)
Cloud Cover: None
Wind: Very light
Temperature: Approximately 55F
Overall Seeing: Poor due to high levels of background light scatter, high relative humidity, and atmospheric turbulence; also, dew falling rapidly
Length of Observing Session: 1h 15m
Equipment: Orion XT10 Plus (fl 1200mm, f/4.7); Paracorr Type 2 (effective fl 1380)

 

Summary: After weeks of cloudy weather, I held out hope for tonight’s viewing conditions. When I poked my head out the door, I could see no clouds, a good number of stars, and no moon. However, clouds had darkened our entire day, meaning the likelihood of unsteady seeing was high. Despite this, I brought out the Dob just in case conditions improved. However, the seeing was not good. The images were shifting almost constantly, achieving sharp focus with any eyepiece was virtually impossible, and high magnifications were completely out of the question. I started out with the Meade HD-60 oculars, but eventually shifted to the Orion Pro Lanthanum Zoom, as this seemed to provide better, sharper images than any others. Go figure.

 

Jupiter: I wanted to hit Jupiter tonight because it is now beginning to sink closer to the horizon with each passing evening. I employed the HD-60 oculars to get the wider field of view with the Dob. At 25mm, the planet’s image was shimmering fairly badly. All four Galilean moons were visible, but Jupiter’s equatorial belts were only *barely* visible during moments of better seeing. At 20mm, the belts almost entirely disappeared, leaving a beige-colored fuzzy ball. So much for Jupiter.

 

Saturn: Hoping for better luck, I switched my attention to Saturn. At 25mm, the image was better than my previous target, probably due to a more favorable declination in the sky. The rings were bright and clear, with the dark gaps between them and the planet easily seen. At 18mm, the atmospheric turbulence became more evident, and no additional detail was visible. At 12mm, the slightest hint of the Cassini Division could be seen during moments of steadier seeing. At 9mm, the Division was less elusive, but still no planetary cloud bands were visible; the image was also shimmering more often than not. Switching to the Orion Pro Lanthanum Zoom, the image gained a degree of sharpness. The shimmering was still evident, but it was easier to see past it. At 8mm using the Zoom, the image was indeed clearer. The Cassini Division was much easier to make out. Some hints of equatorial cloud bands were also visible on the planet itself.

 

M22 (Sagittarius): With the unexpected improvement in image quality with the Zoom, I resigned myself to its use for the rest of the session. With the shimmering atmosphere, I knew my choice of targets would be limited, so I hit this globular cluster. The target was clear at 25mm, showing up as a large, fuzzy cluster of closely spaced stars. I could resolve some individual brighter members even at this magnification. At around 18mm, the member stars were much better resolved, with some layering becoming apparent. At around 14mm, the object became a veritable sea of stars of varying apparent magnitudes—a very cool view. Attempts to obtain decent images at shorter focal lengths left the target dimmed and blurry.

 

M25 (Sagttarius): While in the vicinity, I headed north to this open cluster. At 25mm, the cluster’s bright stars were framed nicely (but only barely!) in the field of view. A nice telescopic view considering the conditions.

 

M31 (Andromeda): The Andromeda Galaxy was washed out of the sky due to the background light scatter, and was not visible with the naked eye. It was here that I noticed that both of my finderscopes were dewing up very quickly, and the tube of the main scope had a generous collection of moisture accumulated on it. My time was drawing short. I was able to locate the target by sweeping the vicinity. At 25mm, the galaxy appeared as a large, oval, nebulous area with a brighter core. Attempts to shorten the focal length of the ocular only normalized the fuzz, making the target appear to be homogenous in brightness throughout. Grr.

 

Double Cluster (Perseus): Before calling my session to an end, I hit the Double Cluster. Both clusters were bright and clear, despite their position lower to the horizon. At 25mm, the member stars were bright and clear in both targets. The northern cluster again revealed the semi-circle asterism of stars near its center. From its current orientation, and with the inverted image of the Dob, it actually looked like a parachute—the semi-circle of stars formed the curved outer edge of the ‘chute, while another brighter star stood where the skydiver would be. This made me smile!

 

Conclusion: I must admit that tonight’s session was a disappointment. The conditions were terrible. The dew furiously forming on the equipment also cut it too short. I had really hoped that things would improve, allowing me to stay out longer. It *was* nice to get back out under the sky after the two-week hiatus imposed by recent bad weather, but this did not feel like a productive session at all. I will have to hope for better conditions next week.

 

 

Until next time.


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#56 MP173

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:23 AM

August 23, 2019 - session 30

 

SS 738pm, no moon (MR 1158)

T 65, DP 52, H 61%

Scope - AT102Ed

Eyepieces:

Meade 32 Plossl -  22x, 2.34 degr

Meade 26 Plossl - 27 x, 1.9 degr

Meade 16 Plossl - 44x, 1.2 degr - 2 x barlow 88x

AT 9 Plossl - 79x, .65 degr.  - 2 x barlow 158x

 

Outside at 810pm. 

 

This was my first session since August 6th due to cloud cover and big moon.  A big cold front moved in and pushed clouds to the south.  The sky had shifted west...Vega was nearly overhead and Cygnus was high in the twilight sky.  My plan was to view the constellation Lacerta which follows Cygnus to the east.  This was my initial trip into this overlooked (and under appreciated) constellation.

 

The constellation is faint and I used Deneb in Cygnus to locate it.  In the twilight, I used 7x35 binoculars to locate 76 and 77 Cygni which was due east of Deneb about 10 degrees.   I located these with my scope.  

 

76 Cygni is a double - easily resolved in the twilight - it is cataloged as s 796 and is 6.0/9.5, 58" @ 233 degrees.  It is the furthest south of a group of 3 bright stars including 77 Cygni.  The third star is just as bright but does not have a number designation.  This is a very nice group of stars with a double in the mix.

 

One degree northwest is STT 447.  I hadnt planned on viewing this, but noticed it on the chart. Again I used the 16mm (44x) to view this double - 7.7/8.5, 29" @ 44.  Back to the 76/77 group and then due west 1.5 degrees to a cluster denoted by iDSA as KroJ2149.6+4104 (the numbers are the RA/DEC).  Realy nice open cluster with two lines intersecting.  I counted 9 stars in a 15' area.   

 

I then moved east to a cluster denoted as Al 111 on iDSA.  Big and sparse with about  20 stars in a 1.5 degree area.  There were several 7-10mag stars which gave some brightness, but very little activity.  

 

Starhopped south and east to 1 Lacerta - which became a nice jumping off star for several doubles in the area.  Back west 1 degree is STF 2876 - 8/9.8, 12" @ 67.  This is the southern star in a group of 3 similar 8th mag stars.  The middle star appears to have a companion, but Stelle Doppie did not list it as a double.

 

Back to 1 Lacerta then east 1/2 degree to STF 2894 which was easily in the FOV with bright star 1 Lacerta.  Data - 6.2/8.5, 16" @ 194.  Nice Y/B colors.  

 

Moved east 1.5 degrees to STF 2906 which required 88x (16mm x 2 barlow) to pull out the 9.6 companion from the 6.5 primary at 4.2" separation.  

 

Continued on the eastward path another 1.5 degrees to bright cluster Teu39, a grouping of 6 stars.  More prominent was a non cluster of 7 stars about 1/2 degree east.  This is a nice FOV of relatively bright stars.

 

The first "WOW" moment was next.  STF 2922 is a great triple (and probably much more for those with larger scopes).  AB and D were observed.  Obviously there is a "C" and actually Stelle Doppie lists six stars.  The three I observed were quite a site.  AB - 5.7/6.3, 22" @ 188 with D at 10.4, 28" @ 154 degrees.  Brilliant, but interestingly Cambridge Double Star Atlas fails to list this.  What an shame.  Check this out.

 

I attempted and failed to see the companion for STF 2942....used 158x but the star was fuzzy.  Should have split this....perhaps I was on the wrong star.  It would have been nice - 7.4/7.6 @ 2.9" separation.  I have split tighter stars.

 

Next was hj 1786 - a nice tight triangle contained this double - 7.0/9.6, 44" @ 226.

 

East 4 degrees to STTA 230 - observed with 16mm...44x - 5.0/9.7, 48" @ 162.

 

North 4 degrees to hj 1735 another multiple.  I observed ABD...another "WOW" moment.  AB 6.7/9.7, 27"  110 with D 6.8, 110" @ 286.  

 

Yet another "WOW" ( I actually said these) with NGC 7209 - an open cluster framed by 3 bright stars to the North and West.  Inside the triangle formed I was able to see 30 almost equal stars - all 10th - 11th mag stars forming a brilliant view.  The 9mm view was even better than the 16mm, darkening the background sky and pulling out a few more faint stars.  Unfortunately I need to realign the AT102ED as the slo mo control cable rubs against the focus knob.  I needed to move east to avoid the issue.

 

Moved east to STF 2902 - a nice yellow white double - 7.6/8.2, 6.5" @ 89.  There appears to be a double star just to the west.

 

I moved to NGC 7243 and had "cable issues" again, but was able to view this fine open cluster.  I saw about 30 stars in a 25' area.  There appeared to be a tight double star in the center of the cluster....more research to determine.

 

STTA 234 was next - a nearly equally matched 8th mag double - 8.1/8.5, 36" @ 134 degrees.

 

I attempted to see NGC 7296 but couldnt really see individual stars... just a faint glow.  That concluded my planned tour of Lacerta.  However, M31 was available and I had not seen it with the new scope.  It was low in the sky but still I could see detail the ETX90RA didnt provide.

 

I quickly did a preview tour of Cassiopeia area - M103, NGC457 then Stock 2 and the Double Cluster.  Cant wait for these objects to move a little higher in the sky.

 

Inside at 1033.  

 

Lacerta is a very interesting constellation with great doubles and a couple of open clusters which warrant attention.

 

Ed


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#57 NYJohn S

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:45 AM

I haven't posted in part 2 so I haven't been getting any notifications. Good to see this thread is already off and running. I'll have to catch up and read the reports. 

 

I've been traveling to some nice dark skies but it always seems to cloud up at night so no real reports. Just some nice vacation time. I did have a partially clear evening in Montauk. I sat on a bench with my wife taking it in naked eye before the clouds swallowed up the sky again. Nice to see Cassiopeia & Andromeda getting higher in the sky. Sunrises have been nice as we watch the morning fog burn off while the fishing boats head out. Clouds always returned for sunset to put on a show with some dazzling sunsets. Tonight is supposed to be clear so I hope to get out with binoculars or a telescope.

 

Glad so many have been getting out and posting. Now that I posted here I'll get the reports in my email.

 

Clear Skies and enjoy the rest of the summer!

John

 

Montauk Aug 2019 Sunset
Montauk Sunrise Aug 2019
Montauk Aug 2019

 


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#58 TheBigK

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 12:21 PM

I was going to go out around 8:30, but ended up going out for ice cream with the family instead. I did get out a little after 10pm and had a nice session. I mainly focused on open clusters in and around Cygnus as well as some of the brighter planetary nebula in the area. I really had no idea how bright some of these were. The last couple were in the northerly direction which is the same direction that the streetlight is in...the streetlight that is about 20 feet from where I have my telescope. I'm able to block out the direct light, but still, the sky in that direction is much brighter than to my east. I saw Pegasus rising a little bit later and decided to view a few doubles near there before heading in (I think all of the doubles were actually in Pisces). I would have loved to stay out longer, but I just got too tired. I might go back out tonight since it's supposed to be a nice clear night out.

 

I created a double star observing list at Stelle Doppie with the following criteria (going from memory on this and the name I gave the list) - "STF", separation > .7. This gave me a list of 3105 STF doubles. This should keep me busy for a long time! I have SS6 highlight the unobserved items on my map. So, I do have to figure out what brighter star I am starting with BEFORE I show the list on the map otherwise it would be really difficult to find the starting point on the map.

 

Ed (MP173) - I also viewed NGC7209 last night and had the same "WOW" moment. That one sure is nice.

 

Telescope - Orion XT10i
Finderscope - Stellarvue 50mm, 9x, 5.8 FOV
Eyepieces:
Paracorr Type 2 (used at all times)
ES30mm - 46x, 1.78 FOV
Nagler 12mm, Type 4  - 115x, 0.71 FOV
Zhumell 6mm - 230x, 0.24 FOV

 

 

Friday, August 23, 2019 10:09pm-12:28am

 

NGC7039 - An ok oc from my backyard. I can tell it would be much nicer in darker skies. The area itself has a pretty dense number of stars though. Best view was with the 30.

 

NGC7039 - Needed more magnification for this one, so used the 6mm (230x). Stars were popping in and out as I viewed. Probably name out 20-25 stars.

 

NGC7082 - A pretty nice open cluster. Quite a few stars resolved. A couple areas of denser stars within the cluster. Best view was with the 12mm.

 

M39 - Very nice cluster with a handful of bright stars. I counted about 30 or so stars with half of them being fairly bright. Viewed with both the 30 and the 12. The 30 was able to frame thre cluster much better than the 12.

 

NGC7086 - Another cluster where I can see stars popping in and out. Tried both the 12 and the 6 and can't decide which view was better. I'll need to try this one again from either the mountains out the desert.

 

NGC7209 - Nice oc even from my back yard! The 12 (115x) was able to nicely frame it. Lots of near equal brightness stars in this one.

 

NGC7243 - Another nice backyard open cluster. Framed nicely with both the 12 and the 30. A few groupings of brighter stars with some dimmer stars mixed in.

 

NGC7662 (Blue Snowball Nebula) - First time viewing this planetary nebula. I wasn't expecting it to be this bright. With the 6 I can definitely see the bluish coloring..it does look like a small blue snowball. With averted vision I can just start making out some of the structure. Cannot see the central star.

 

NGC6826 (Blinking Planetary Nebula) - I was able to get it to blink. Focused on the central star and the nebulosity would go sway. Stop looking at the central star and it would come back. Nice optical illusion. Viewed with the 6mm (230x).

 

NGC6543 (Cat's Eye Nebula) - Another bright planetary nebula. Blue green color. Interesting reading the info that SS6 has on this pn.

 

STF25 - Got a nice split with the 6mm (1.0 separation). Estimated the pa to be between 180 & 200. SD shows this as being an uncertain double.

 

STF20 - This one is easily split with the 30mm. This one is a physical double per SD.

 

STF32 (49 Psc) - Another one that was split easily with the 30mm (46x). Not a physical double.

 

STF37 - Was able to split with the 30, but had a much nicer view with the 12mm. This is a nice equal magnitude double. I watched it drift out of the fov a few times. Physical double.

 

Clear skies!


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#59 The Luckster

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 04:21 PM

Tonight's the night:

 

48613622141_9d372904a9_z.jpg

 

 

Along with my new OIII filter.

 

CS

 

jason


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#60 brentknight

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 05:54 PM

Very nice.
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#61 SeaBee1

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:13 PM

I was going to go out around 8:30, but ended up going out for ice cream with the family instead.*SNIP*

 

Ice cream and family trumps EVERYTHING... IMHO, of course...

 

 

Tonight's the night:

 

48613622141_9d372904a9_z.jpg

 

 

Along with my new OIII filter.

 

CS

 

jason

 

Ooooo! Pretty! Let us know how they perform, Jason!

 

CB


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#62 TheBigK

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:16 PM

I would not like some wild critters around me whilst peering through an ocular at night.

 

So, chalk one up for the Bortle 5.5 observatory known as my balcony!

 

 

Oh yeah, my ES82 24 came today from Astronomics, so, West Coast observers you can expect cloudy conditions this evening...sorry.  wink.gif

 

CS (not tonight west coast)

 

jason

 

 

Tonight's the night:

 

48613622141_9d372904a9_z.jpg

 

 

Along with my new OIII filter.

 

CS

 

jason

 

 

Congrats on the new eyepiece and filter! I just noticed your comment and that you are in the Los Angeles area. Um, now our skies will surely cloud up! lol.gif lol.gif


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#63 Spacefreak1974

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 12:00 AM

I was so much looking forward to staying late and into the morning after the club general meeting, but uninvited clouds were rampant and while the observing from 9:30-10:30 wasn’t too bad closer to 11 it was just too much for me. It was so great to see so many cars on the north field tonight. I think I counted 20+ scopes out there tonight! Quite a few members brought visitors as well which was great to see. This is the first night I think we’ve had the 36”, 14” and scopes on the field since I joined in 2015. I actually think we had more people outside after the meeting than inside the observatory for the presentation. Hopefully we get some clearer skies next time around.
Jon Thomas


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#64 NYJohn S

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:39 AM

The sky was partially clear around 11:00pm last night and I got finally out with the binoculars for a short session.

 

I started by Cassiopeia and located Double Cluster below it. The transparency wasn't the best with clouds passing through but both clusters resolved well in the 10x50's. Stock 2 showed well and the stick figure of the muscle man was readily apparent along with the trail of stars that lead to it.

 

I located the V asterism to the NE of Segin and worked my way to NGC 663 between Segin & Ruchbah. It was easy to see as a soft but fairly large hazy area. Moving closer to Ruchbah I located M103 as a brighter but smaller hazy spot. The 7th mag double star STF131 was prominent on the N edge of the cluster.

 

Moving up Cassiopeia I located NGC 457 the Owl Cluster. It was tiny and I couldn't see the owl shape but the eyes gave it away. I followed the stars of Cassiopeia, Navi to Shedar taking in the nice yellow color of Achird along the way. To the S and W of Shedar there's a nice grouping of stars scattered about that I always check out with binoculars. 

 

Continuing to Caph I followed the beautiful trail of stars that extend from it to the S. Above that to the west I located NGC 7789 Carolines Rose Cluster. It sits between Rho Cas & Sigma Cas. It showed as a large but faint hazy area with averted vision. The stars in the area especially around Sigma Cas are colorful and quite striking.

 

Backtracking, I followed the line from Shedar to Caph and continued to the NW until I landed on the wishbone shaped asterism Hrr12 right next to 4 Cas. From there I located M52 to the SE. It stood out against the dark sky as a fairly bright and distinct hazy spot. Scanning to the NW about half way between M52 and Iota Cep there's an interesting grouping of stars that I always admire. They seem to make all kinds of interesting shapes and patterns. In the Oct issue of S&T the author refers the them as "The Kings Gift". It's definitely a nice grouping of stars worth checking out. 

 

Back to Segin and scanning to the east I located Kemble's Cascade. It's a nice chain of stars that runs down and leads right to NGC 1502. There are some nice red stars in the chain and NGC 1502 although tiny is easy to spot with binoculars. It's dominated by the bright 6th mag SZ Camelopardalis which makes the cluster easy to spot. 

 

M31 - I ended the night taking a look at M31. It was just a large oblong hazy spot but it showed well and averted vision really helped to show it's size. The fiery orange-red Mirach was shining brightly below it.

 

It was really nice to get out again. I felt a little rusty at first but still managed to find some old friends.

 

Clear Skies!

John


Edited by NYJohn S, 25 August 2019 - 11:14 AM.

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#65 aeajr

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:58 AM

I was at the Custer Observatory giving a talk on observing basics.  About 80 people, from 7:30 to about 9.  Ran longer than I planned.  Several people said they had seen several of the talks I have given. 

 

Then we went outside and I was doing a little sky show with a laser pointer, focused on for naked eye and binocular targets.   People enjoy it and I enjoy doing it.  Had my bucket of loaner binos next to me and people used them.  I think I might have lost one pair.  Not sure if I had 4 or 5 in the bucket.  But no biggie, they were cheap. 

 

I had my 80 mm refractor set-up with a 26 mm eyepiece, 15.4X, to show Jupiter in a similar view to how it would look in binoculars.   Folks came to see and were surprised to hear that they would be able to see the moons with binoculars, but they saw them at 15X in the telescope.   

 

I put it on Saturn for a test but not enough to show the rings, no surprise, so I put it back on Jupiter.

 

I explained the Ecliptic and how the Sun, Moon and planets travel this line so they become easy to find. 

 

Walked the Summer Triangle, Northern Cross, described Albireo, then showed them how to find the coat hanger.  People with binos followed my laser as I put it on the coat hanger.   Lots of wows.

 

We split Mizar and Alcor and talked about Polaris and how the sky revolves around it. 

 

I pointed out the teapot in Sagittarius, something I can't see from home. 

 

Funny because I was right next to a 12" Dob showing Jupiter and various other things.   Naturally he was at much higher power than I.  He too was doing a bit of a sky talk with a laser, explaining the constellations.   He was very good with the mythology behind the constellations.  That has never really interested me. 

 

There were a lot of people who showed up after that talk so we had well over 100 out in the field.  There were four scopes on the ground and the Custer dome which I think was on Jupiter all night.

 

I really enjoy outreach.  Sharing it with people makes it all fresh and new for me, again.

 

The clouds started to roll in around 10 pm.  Jupiter kept going behind clouds as it got lower in the sky.  I packed up around 10:45 and was on the road for my 90 minute ride home by 11:20.

 

Overall, a great night under the stars. 

 

Next talk at Custer will be 10/5, the International Observe the Moon Night.

https://moon.nasa.go...event/overview/

 

I invited people to bring their scopes so we could get as many scopes as possible on the moon at the same time.

 

Clear skies!


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#66 The Luckster

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 11:30 AM

I was at the Custer Observatory giving a talk on observing basics.  About 80 people, from 7:30 to about 9.  Ran longer than I planned.  Several people said they had seen several of the talks I have given. 

 

Then we went outside and I was doing a little sky show with a laser pointer, focused on for naked eye and binocular targets.   People enjoy it and I enjoy doing it.  Had my bucket of loaner binos next to me and people used them.  I think I might have lost one pair.  Not sure if I had 4 or 5 in the bucket.  But no biggie, they were cheap. 

 

I had my 80 mm refractor set-up with a 26 mm eyepiece, 15.4X, to show Jupiter in a similar view to how it would look in binoculars.   Folks came to see and were surprised to hear that they would be able to see the moons with binoculars, but they saw them at 15X in the telescope.   

 

I put it on Saturn for a test but not enough to show the rings, no surprise, so I put it back on Jupiter.

 

I explained the Ecliptic and how the Sun, Moon and planets travel this line so they become easy to find. 

 

Walked the Summer Triangle, Northern Cross, described Albireo, then showed them how to find the coat hanger.  People with binos followed my laser as I put it on the coat hanger.   Lots of wows.

 

We split Mizar and Alcor and talked about Polaris and how the sky revolves around it. 

 

I pointed out the teapot in Sagittarius, something I can't see from home. 

 

Funny because I was right next to a 12" Dob showing Jupiter and various other things.   Naturally he was at much higher power than I.  He too was doing a bit of a sky talk with a laser, explaining the constellations.   He was very good with the mythology behind the constellations.  That has never really interested me. 

 

There were a lot of people who showed up after that talk so we had well over 100 out in the field.  There were four scopes on the ground and the Custer dome which I think was on Jupiter all night.

 

I really enjoy outreach.  Sharing it with people makes it all fresh and new for me, again.

 

The clouds started to roll in around 10 pm.  Jupiter kept going behind clouds as it got lower in the sky.  I packed up around 10:45 and was on the road for my 90 minute ride home by 11:20.

 

Overall, a great night under the stars. 

 

Next talk at Custer will be 10/5, the International Observe the Moon Night.

https://moon.nasa.go...event/overview/

 

I invited people to bring their scopes so we could get as many scopes as possible on the moon at the same time.

 

Clear skies!

 

You're a good man, Ed.

 

 

CS

 

jason


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#67 brentknight

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 11:37 AM

Tonight's the night:

 

48613622141_9d372904a9_z.jpg

 

 

Along with my new OIII filter.

 

CS

 

jason

Hey Jason...  I bet those would really show off the underside of my cloud deck.  Are there really stars still up there?


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#68 Migwan

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 12:25 PM


STF2615 - Initially split with thre 30 then dropped the 12. Per SD, this is not a physical double. Shoot, clouds already rolling in.

 

STF2612 - Made out thre AB pair, but couldn't make out the C component before the stupid clouds rolled in.

 

 

Session 2

Saturday, August 17, 2019 8:31-10:59pm

 

STF2544 - Made out the A,B, and C stars shown on SD. AB pair is uncertain, C not physical.

 

STF2543 - Best view was with the 12. SD shows it being uncertain nature.

 

STF2566 - Not a physical double. Nice split with the 12mm. Main star had a definite orange coloring. Beautiful looking double.

 

STF2532 - Another nice orange main star. Can see the A, B, and C components, but not the D. Used the 12 and the 6. Not a physical system.

 

A2197 - AB and AC both made out. The AC is an STF double per SD. Used the 6 and can just see the 13th mag start 6. I probably wouldn't have seen it if it was much further away.

 

STF2513 - Can just split it with the 12. Uncertain double per SD.

 

STF2492 (23 Aquila) - This one is a physical double. Split with the 12. Tried for the C component but couldn't see it.

 

STFA40 - Made out the AB and BD components. Could not see the C star. Uncertain double. Used the 6mm.

 

STFA40 (24 Aquila) - Kind of a part of the previous double.

 

STF2497 - Not a physical double, but beautiful in the 30. Nice wide double.

 

STF2498 - Quadruple system. AB are physical, AC uncertain, AD not physical. Looked really nice in the 12.

 

STF2462 - Made out the A, B, and D components. Cannot see the C. Best view was with the 6.

 

STF2833 - Split first with the 30 then with the 12. Easy in both. This is a physical double.

 

STF2831 - Another physical double. Can just make out the B component in the 30. Easier in the 12. Fairly wide separation. B at just about N.

 

ST2848 - Beautiful near equal magnitude physical double star. Looked great in the 12. Looks like clouds are rolling in from the coast, so will be cutting this session short soon. But I will enjoy a nice glass of Scotch after.

 

STF2856 - Uncertain double. Close, but split with the 6mm.

 

STF2878 - Saw all 3 components with the 6. AB was a close split.

 

Nice.  Seems not by chance, I caught this bug.  (Not blaming you or anything like that.  smile.gif )  Do you know of any sight where STF #s can be converted SAO #s?  I found the "Gallery of Multiples" and other sites, but no easy conversion.  

 

jd


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#69 Migwan

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 12:27 PM

8/21 (23:00-01:00), 22 (01:00-03:00), 24 (23:00-01:00) /2019,   Temps in mid 50s, RH 57-85%, Seeing below average to average, Transparency average to above average,   Wind NW to NE under 7 mph Bortle 5,  SQM 20.56.

 

This multi night log concerns a sudden interest in multi star doubles after spotting them on Tonight’s Sky.   I chose targets from moderate to challenging and not all targets are listed below due to some needed brevity.   All comments concern use of CPC1100 and unless otherwise noted, were at 136x.

 

Targets night 1)  SAO 71173, 5035, 67451, 90440.   Generally these targets have wide spacing between main star and its doubles and though this info was provided on referring site, my inexperience left me expecting much closer spacing.   In essence, these targets were too easy.  The only real difficulty was seeing a few stars in the magnitude 12 range.  That and not having noted the spacing I could not determine which stars were in the “double” from some background stars.   Oops.

 

Targets night 2)  SAO 90440, 72228, 36375, 50335.  Generally, these target were also not as closely spaced as I had hoped.   There was one 13 and one 12.6 mag star in the mix and all the stars were easily identified, my having included spacing and magnitude in my notes.  Oops on the over abundant spacing.

 

Targets night 3)  SAO 70499, 4810, 69856, 48247, 12968, 47037, 74359.  The targets given are listed in order of lowest separation and most are just doubles, as I felt the need to find the parameters of what was possible over finding multiple star doubles.  The lowest mag star was 11 and spacing ranged from a minimum of 10 to 1.

 

What I found was that all stars were identifiable where the spacing was 2 or greater.  If the spacing was below 2 and the difference in magnitude was greater than 3, I was unable to see the smaller star.  I projected magnification to as high as 666x without any success on those undivided stars.   74359 was the lowest separation at 1 of two stars, one at mag 5.5 and the other at 5.9 were easily seen at 333x and clearly divided at 666x. 

 

Never really gave much attention to doubles in the past, but they may well be the best way to examine conditions and your optics.  For instance, on night 3 I felt that my SCT had acclimatized, but when I happened to turn the fan on to test if the air currents would damage the view, it actually improved it quite a bit.   This was opposite of my expectations for both acclimation of the scope and/or the effect of small air currents caused by fans. 

 

I hope now to find some “doubles” where multiple stars are spaced 3 to 5 from a main star that I could share with others thru the various seasons.   I do like the double double, which is already on my must show others target list, but I would really prefer closer spacing of smaller stars to a massive central star.
     
jd


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#70 Pbinder

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:04 PM

I was at Custer same time as Ed but I never found time to say hello because so many people were lined up to see targets. Really did not get much personal time with my telescope. I was sent up in between two 12 inch dobs. Most visitors were interested in seeing the planets. I showed M11, owl cluster, Albireo, Andromeda and planets. I was glad I used my cheap zoom eyepiece as kids grabbed it several times. I even had to tell someone to stop touching my scope as they moved it in search of something with brutish movement.  Overall most people were very nice and thankful to use our equipment. 

 

My biggest thrill was seeing Saturn through a large cassegrain. It appeared larger than Jupiter does in my scope and in such detail. I'm pretty sure it was CGX-L EQUATORIAL 1400 SCHMIDT-CASSEGRAIN TELESCOPE. Wishing you all clear skies.


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#71 TheBigK

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:12 PM

Nice.  Seems not by chance, I caught this bug.  (Not blaming you or anything like that.  smile.gif )  Do you know of any sight where STF #s can be converted SAO #s?  I found the "Gallery of Multiples" and other sites, but no easy conversion.  

 

jd

 

 

 

snip

I hope now to find some “doubles” where multiple stars are spaced 3 to 5 from a main star that I could share with others thru the various seasons.   I do like the double double, which is already on my must show others target list, but I would really prefer closer spacing of smaller stars to a massive central star.
     

Ha! I caught this bug from MP173!

 

The Stelle Doppie site can, but you have to do it one by one. https://www.stelledo...2.php?section=1 From there you enter STFxxxx (whatever the number is) in the search box. From the details page for that STF item (sometimes it will go directly to the details if there is only 1 pair of stars in the system, other times you'll have to click on the pair you want info for) there is a section "OTHER CATALOGS AND DESIGNATIONS" that shows the HD, SAO, Gaia, etc numbers for that object. On the SD site you can also do an advanced search if you want to put a list together of doubles for various criteria, including catalog (STF, Burnham, etc), separation, min and max magnitudes, delta magnitudes, etc. Very useful tool!

 

My wife went to bingo and my nieces were over entertaining my 8 year old daugter and my sons and nephew were watching movies, so I was able to get in a nice long (for me) session. Just over 4 hours. Finished up with a small glass of bourbon.

 

About a week ago I found out how simple it is to change the view in SS6 to orient it to what it looks like in my eyepiece. I've had the fov circles setup from the get go for my finder, 30mm, and 12mm eyepieces with the Paracorr in place. Now I can see exactly what I need without having to mentally flip things around. So much simpler to do the final starhopping from my eyepiece now.

 

I'll probably get in a short session or 2 during the week...hopefully.

 

Telescope - Orion XT10i
Finderscope - Stellarvue 50mm, 9x, 5.8 FOV
Eyepieces:
Paracorr Type 2 (used at all times)
ES30mm - 46x, 1.78 FOV
Nagler 12mm, Type 4  - 115x, 0.71 FOV
Zhumell 6mm - 230x, 0.24 FOV

 

Saturday, August 24, 2019 8:23pm-12:48am

 

STF2662 - Clean split with the 6. I can just barely split it with the 12mm (1.9"). Uncertain double.

 

STF2686 - Nice wide double. Per SD, this is not a physical double. Nice looking visual double though. Nice looking on the 12mm. Not a physical double.

 

STF2713 - Equal magnitude double star. Uncertain pair. Easily split with the 12. 1000 light years distance per SS6.  Uncertain double.

 

STF2723 - This was a tough split tonight. I could just see the companion star, about 30% of the time. Used the 6mm. I did estimate the pa pretty closely before I looked at the details of the pair, so I'm certain that I did split it. Uncertain per SD.  Uncertain double per SD.

 

NGC6934 - I was surprised how easy this gc was to find and how "bright" it was. A magnitude 9 star closer to it and to the west made it easy to spot. Used both the 12 and the 6, but couldn't get any details to pop out. Just a ball of fuzz.

 

M15 - In the area, so decided to visit M15 again. Brilliant as usual. Lots of stars popping out both with direct vision and averted vision.

 

M2 - Spectacular globular cluster. It was a little bit in the murky part of the sky, but still really nice. Looked at it with the 30mm, 12, and the 6. Some of the brightest stars were popping in and out with averted vision. Will check this one again when a little higher in the sky.

 

M72 - Can barely make out a very faint fuzz. It took a few minutes of looking just to see that.

 

M73 - At first I wasn't sure if I was looking at the cluster until I looked at the description. Apparently this is a 4 star asterism. Yep, that's what I'm seeing.

 

NGC7009 (Saturn Nebula) - Bluish green flattened disc. Easily seen with the 30mm, but started seeing structure with the 12. More magnification with the 6 allowed a little more detail. Will add this to my favorites list.

 

STF2983 - Back to some more doubles. Nice split with the 12mm. Not a physical double. Companion star drifted out right to the west which matches the pa.

 

STF3012 - This is a WOW web viewed along with STF3013 in thre same fov. I used the 6mm to get a little more magnification and easily split both pairs. Both pairs are physical doubles per SD.

 

STF3013 - See observation notes for STF3012. WOW!

 

STF3021 - Split with the 6mm. Couldn't split with less magnification. Uncertain double.

 

STF3041 - Really nice view with the 12. Per SD  the BC pair is a physical double. This are the closest pair. The AB and AC pairs are not physical.

 

STF3032 - Viewed with the 12 and estimated about 340 for the pa which was really close (actual is 339). Wide separation, but the B component is mag 12 so not real bright. Not a physical double.

 

STF3021 - Had the 30mm in while star hopping and was able to see all 3 components. The AB pair are 8.7" separation and are not a physical pair. The AC pair are 117" from each other and are a physical pair. Interesting!

 

STF3020 - Couldn't seem to split it with the 13, but no problem splitting it with the 6. Not a physical double.

 

STF3007 - Interesting system. The AB pair is a physical double with a period of 2161 years (https://www.stelledo...iddoppia=103671). The orbital information, including graph, is at the link. How cool is that?!? AC is not physical. Viewed with the 12mm.

 

STF2997 - This is a physical double that was easily split with the 30mm. Near equal double system. The light left this pair of stars in 1579.

 

STF3005 - Viewed this one with the 12mm. Getting higher in thr sky so the 12.9 mag companion was pretty easy to see. This is a physical double 595 light years away. The light left this pair in 1424.

 

STF3058 - This one is wide enough that I split it with the 30mm. According to SD this is a physical pair.  Just noticed that this is item 4 from the Henry Draper catalog.

 

STF17 - AB pair is physical, BC is uncertain. AB is an STF, BC is a Burnham. Took a bit to see the C star at 13.1.

 

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) - Since M31 was really close to where I eased viewing, I decided to finish up there. Still unable to vote M110. I think I caught a brief glimpse though. Will keep trying.

 

Clear skies!


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#72 The Luckster

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 03:44 PM

8/24/2019

7:00 to 11:00 P.M.

Balcony

85 to 80 degrees F

3/S 3/T

 

Jupiter & Saturn rig:

ES 127 f/15 Mak

ES T1 Alt Az w/anti vibration pads

GSO 1.25" Dielectric diagonal

 

ES68 20mm  (95x  .72* fov  1.32mm EP)

SVB 18mm  (106x  .68* fov  1.18mm EP)

ES82 14mm  (136x  .60* fov  .92mm EP)

ES82 11mm  (173x  .47* fov  .72mm EP)

Burgess 10mm  (190x  .16* fov  .66 EP)

Meade 8.8 mm  (216x  .38* fov  .58 EP)

BST 5mm  (380x  .15* fov  .33 EP)

 

DSO rig:

Orion ST120mm f/5 refractor

EST1 Alt Az w/anti vibration pads

GSO 2" Quartz dielectric diagonal

SVB OIII 2" filter

 

Olivon 30mm 80* UWA 2"  (20x  4* fov  6mm EP)  Sweeper Ocular

ES82 24mm 2"  (25x  3.28* fov  4.8mm EP)

ES68 20mm 1.25"  (30x  2.27* fov  4mm EP)

 

It was not that good of an evening to observe, but that did not stop me in observations.  I started with Jupiter and Saturn, then swapped out scopes on the ES Twilight One mount (love this mount.) to observe DSOs.  

 

My new ES82 24mm 2" performed very well, irregardless of lackluster viewing conditions, it may deem my ES68 24mm 1.25" as an unnecessary ocular in need of letting go.  The new ES82 24 gives me a FoV of 3.28* on the ST120.  Though, quite generous and usable to near the image circle edge, the view still felt a bit claustrophobic. The new ES68 20mm 1.25" is also a solid performer, and fills a niche in my kit.

 

The new OIII is a winner in my book, though I failed to observe The Veil earlier in my session, the OIII proved it's worth on other subjects, and will be a welcomed addition to my kit.  M8 revealed a more nebula with some detail, M20 improved only slightly, M17 became very solid, large and bright.  M16 there was a minor boost, to name a few subjects viewed with the OIII filter.

 

I'm not going to get into to much detail with most subjects observed, just gonna give a recap, if you will.  Planets then DSOs.

 

Jupiter was viewed best with the ES68 20mm and the SVB 18mm, giving tight and contrasty views with main bands visible.  Increases in mag only brought more of the boiling effect, though the ES82 14 did provide the most detail.  Ocular/diagonal orientation placed Europa lower left of it's parent, while Callisto was upper right and Io was lower right a little further out.  Ganymede was out of the fov.

 

Saturn actually returned nicer views than it's Gas Giant brother, and I was able to keep a solid and contrasty image of Saturn up to the 173x mag of the ES82 11mm.   Saturn's view was still respectable to me at 216x of the 8.8mm.  Even at 20mm, the EQ band was easily visible, the Cassini division apparent and a clearly defined planet shadow on the back portion of Saturn's ring system.  I did note a first with Saturn; I observed two other moons other that Titan (mag 9.09): Rhea (mag 10.42) and Dione (mag 11.09).  In the Ocular image circle, Titan was lower left and a little distant from Saturn.  Rhea was upper right and closer to Saturn, flickered in and out at lower mags and becoming directly visible at higher mags.  Dione, which was located upper left and closer to Saturn, began flickering in and out of averted view at higher mags (216x 8.8mm).  During these planetary observations, 4 satellites passed within my fov, but I failed to identify any...but I did get one later.

 

DSOs:

 

I started with the big 24mm (used 90%), aimed the ST120 at Kaus Borealis in Sagittarius and went to work.

 

M22 GC seemed to have more structure this time around, with a couple of pinpoints appeared through averted vision.  M28 GC a smaller, tighter and more circular ball.  The Globs of M54, M69 and M70 were just small, dim fuzzy balls. M8 N, average view.  Add the OIII and OMG, look at all of that nebula!    M20 N, so-so and only a minor improvement with the OIII.  The Open Clusters of M21, M23, M25, and M18 all became more pristine, elegant, so to speak with the Big 24.  Perhaps a little more sharpness and contrast with a wider FoV has boosted the improved views... M17 was clearly visible, but got bigger and to me brighter with the OIII.  M16 had a minor improvement with the OIII.  I could not detect the Nebula of Sh2-54 with or without the OIII--I have only been able to view this target with my 70 and 80 binoculars.

 

Head to Scorpius.

 

The M7 OC was lovely with the Big 24, but not as majestic as in my 15x70 binoculars.  M6 OC, which is tighter, looked really good.  I could not detect the Cat's Paw nebula, but I did observe a smallish haze in the War & Peace nebula (I did not have the OIII mounted at this time).  The scattered open clusters around Scorpius, NGC 6441, NGC 6281, NGC 6231, NGC 6124,etc, were all distinct, all clearly clusters and unique in the star clustering.  I'll need to return and get more in-depth, as with everything else I observe... Off to Antares, love it!  Hop to M4 GC, not as dense as M22 in SAG, I could detect a pinpoint or two after some longer averted vision.  Up to M80, small but very dense fuzz ball.  M19 GC, and M62 GC were close to similar in size, structure and fuzzyness.  Both were small but easily seen as a GC.  M19 seemed to be packed a little tighter.

 

Okay, during my time in Scorpius, a satellite zipped by in my FoV, and I was both quick enough and lucky to find out what it was:  A Cosmos 1898 Rocket body.  I will continue to try to determine what orbiting man-made objects are (like Cosmos or Atlas) that cross my FOV.

 

After this, then I plugged in the Olivon 30mm, and started sweeping the visible sky.  Then I'd sweep again with the OIII mounted, I like this type of observing...

 

I did spend some time with M31, but it was still in the low horizon urban murk so the best I got was a fuzzy oblong with a slightly brighter center.  The 14mm hinted at a slightly larger fuzzy footprint.

 

So, Big 24, score.  OIII, score.  ES 20mm Panoptic ( wink.gif wink.gif wink.gif  ), score. 

 

CS

 

jason


Edited by The Luckster, 25 August 2019 - 03:51 PM.

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#73 aeajr

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 04:46 PM

I was at Custer same time as Ed but I never found time to say hello because so many people were lined up to see targets. Really did not get much personal time with my telescope. I was sent up in between two 12 inch dobs. Most visitors were interested in seeing the planets. I showed M11, owl cluster, Albireo, Andromeda and planets. I was glad I used my cheap zoom eyepiece as kids grabbed it several times. I even had to tell someone to stop touching my scope as they moved it in search of something with brutish movement.  Overall most people were very nice and thankful to use our equipment. 

 

My biggest thrill was seeing Saturn through a large cassegrain. It appeared larger than Jupiter does in my scope and in such detail. I'm pretty sure it was CGX-L EQUATORIAL 1400 SCHMIDT-CASSEGRAIN TELESCOPE. Wishing you all clear skies.

I didn't see you.  I presume you arrived while I was doing the presentation.  When we came out it was dark.

 

Glad you had a good time.   Maybe next time we can travel together.   


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#74 brentknight

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 04:47 PM

8/24/2019

7:00 to 11:00 P.M.

Balcony

85 to 80 degrees F

3/S 3/T

 

Jupiter & Saturn rig:

ES 127 f/15 Mak

ES T1 Alt Az w/anti vibration pads

GSO 1.25" Dielectric diagonal

 

ES68 20mm  (95x  .72* fov  1.32mm EP)

SVB 18mm  (106x  .68* fov  1.18mm EP)

ES82 14mm  (136x  .60* fov  .92mm EP)

ES82 11mm  (173x  .47* fov  .72mm EP)

Burgess 10mm  (190x  .16* fov  .66 EP)

Meade 8.8 mm  (216x  .38* fov  .58 EP)

BST 5mm  (380x  .15* fov  .33 EP)

 

DSO rig:

Orion ST120mm f/5 refractor

EST1 Alt Az w/anti vibration pads

GSO 2" Quartz dielectric diagonal

SVB OIII 2" filter

 

Olivon 30mm 80* UWA 2"  (20x  4* fov  6mm EP)  Sweeper Ocular

ES82 24mm 2"  (25x  3.28* fov  4.8mm EP)

ES68 20mm 1.25"  (30x  2.27* fov  4mm EP)

 

It was not that good of an evening to observe, but that did not stop me in observations.  I started with Jupiter and Saturn, then swapped out scopes on the ES Twilight One mount (love this mount.) to observe DSOs.  

 

My new ES82 24mm 2" performed very well, irregardless of lackluster viewing conditions, it may deem my ES68 24mm 1.25" as an unnecessary ocular in need of letting go.  The new ES82 24 gives me a FoV of 3.28* on the ST120.  Though, quite generous and usable to near the image circle edge, the view still felt a bit claustrophobic. The new ES68 20mm 1.25" is also a solid performer, and fills a niche in my kit.

 

The new OIII is a winner in my book, though I failed to observe The Veil earlier in my session, the OIII proved it's worth on other subjects, and will be a welcomed addition to my kit.  M8 revealed a more nebula with some detail, M20 improved only slightly, M17 became very solid, large and bright.  M16 there was a minor boost, to name a few subjects viewed with the OIII filter.

 

I'm not going to get into to much detail with most subjects observed, just gonna give a recap, if you will.  Planets then DSOs.

 

Jupiter was viewed best with the ES68 20mm and the SVB 18mm, giving tight and contrasty views with main bands visible.  Increases in mag only brought more of the boiling effect, though the ES82 14 did provide the most detail.  Ocular/diagonal orientation placed Europa lower left of it's parent, while Callisto was upper right and Io was lower right a little further out.  Ganymede was out of the fov.

 

Saturn actually returned nicer views than it's Gas Giant brother, and I was able to keep a solid and contrasty image of Saturn up to the 173x mag of the ES82 11mm.   Saturn's view was still respectable to me at 216x of the 8.8mm.  Even at 20mm, the EQ band was easily visible, the Cassini division apparent and a clearly defined planet shadow on the back portion of Saturn's ring system.  I did note a first with Saturn; I observed two other moons other that Titan (mag 9.09): Rhea (mag 10.42) and Dione (mag 11.09).  In the Ocular image circle, Titan was lower left and a little distant from Saturn.  Rhea was upper right and closer to Saturn, flickered in and out at lower mags and becoming directly visible at higher mags.  Dione, which was located upper left and closer to Saturn, began flickering in and out of averted view at higher mags (216x 8.8mm).  During these planetary observations, 4 satellites passed within my fov, but I failed to identify any...but I did get one later.

 

DSOs:

 

I started with the big 24mm (used 90%), aimed the ST120 at Kaus Borealis in Sagittarius and went to work.

 

M22 GC seemed to have more structure this time around, with a couple of pinpoints appeared through averted vision.  M28 GC a smaller, tighter and more circular ball.  The Globs of M54, M69 and M70 were just small, dim fuzzy balls. M8 N, average view.  Add the OIII and OMG, look at all of that nebula!    M20 N, so-so and only a minor improvement with the OIII.  The Open Clusters of M21, M23, M25, and M18 all became more pristine, elegant, so to speak with the Big 24.  Perhaps a little more sharpness and contrast with a wider FoV has boosted the improved views... M17 was clearly visible, but got bigger and to me brighter with the OIII.  M16 had a minor improvement with the OIII.  I could not detect the Nebula of Sh2-54 with or without the OIII--I have only been able to view this target with my 70 and 80 binoculars.

 

Head to Scorpius.

 

The M7 OC was lovely with the Big 24, but not as majestic as in my 15x70 binoculars.  M6 OC, which is tighter, looked really good.  I could not detect the Cat's Paw nebula, but I did observe a smallish haze in the War & Peace nebula (I did not have the OIII mounted at this time).  The scattered open clusters around Scorpius, NGC 6441, NGC 6281, NGC 6231, NGC 6124,etc, were all distinct, all clearly clusters and unique in the star clustering.  I'll need to return and get more in-depth, as with everything else I observe... Off to Antares, love it!  Hop to M4 GC, not as dense as M22 in SAG, I could detect a pinpoint or two after some longer averted vision.  Up to M80, small but very dense fuzz ball.  M19 GC, and M62 GC were close to similar in size, structure and fuzzyness.  Both were small but easily seen as a GC.  M19 seemed to be packed a little tighter.

 

Okay, during my time in Scorpius, a satellite zipped by in my FoV, and I was both quick enough and lucky to find out what it was:  A Cosmos 1898 Rocket body.  I will continue to try to determine what orbiting man-made objects are (like Cosmos or Atlas) that cross my FOV.

 

After this, then I plugged in the Olivon 30mm, and started sweeping the visible sky.  Then I'd sweep again with the OIII mounted, I like this type of observing...

 

I did spend some time with M31, but it was still in the low horizon urban murk so the best I got was a fuzzy oblong with a slightly brighter center.  The 14mm hinted at a slightly larger fuzzy footprint.

 

So, Big 24, score.  OIII, score.  ES 20mm Panoptic ( wink.gif wink.gif wink.gif  ), score. 

 

CS

 

jason

Very nice report Jason - Thanks!

 

I think the only things that help with M20 are more glass or more darkness.  My best views have always been without a filter where I can just make out the dark patches with my 10" or above.

 

Your 7x35's might be a little small, but it's worth a try to mount the O-III in front of one of the objectives and then try for the Veil (I leave both eyes open when I do this).  I was able to see the brighter parts with my 10x50's and also M-57 and the North America.  It also helps if you can cover your head to block out any stray lights...

 

I've had a couple nights this past month where the skies have been cloudy, but with patches through the clouds.  I need to get myself out on those nights, because it seems like the fully clear nights are few and far between.


Edited by brentknight, 25 August 2019 - 05:07 PM.

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#75 brentknight

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 04:57 PM

I just bought a Paracorr Type 2 from a fellow CN'er.  I've never used one before but plan to use it primarily in the 14".  At F/4.7 I think it should help, and maybe even in the 10" at F/6.  The coma hasn't bothered me much since I concentrate in the center of the field, but I think it will help on extended objects like big open clusters, or on fields where there are multiple objects.  It's one of those things that I really hate to spend money on - kinda a necessary evil I guess.  I'd much rather blow twice this much on a new 8mm Ethos...


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