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#2151 chrysalis

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Posted 01 June 2020 - 08:00 PM

Thank Stephen! Yes, I still have my well-loved copy from my pilgrimage to Barrington, NJ in the mid-70s, after finally talking my Father into going.The vast profundity of illustrations stuck with me my whole life, and whenever I am reminded of one by anyone's need, I post it. I first found M11 by star-hopping according to the illustrations in the original little booklet that came with my Edmund (either 3" f/10 or 4.25" f/10) telescope. I still have the book "New Handbook of the Heavens" from when I got the 3" in I think December 1965 too! 

 

Once I got my 4.25", I still did not know how to utilize the equatorial mount correctly, and would stgill pick it up and rotate it like I had done for a couple of years with my 3". I finally buckled down and did my best to dope out how to use the EQ mount...and was successful! In the days before the internet, when it was your brain and the library versus the universe, you earned a real sense of accomplishment for each thing you were able to figure out, even the small ones.


 

#2152 ETXer

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 06:32 AM

Good morning All, last night's session was a practically unprecedented third evening in a row of observation. There was a caveat... reduced transparency to repeated bands of high cirrus which became more prevalent as the night progressed. That along with the waxing gibbous Moon at 77%, made for an abbreviated deep-sky session that concluded with some more lunar observation.

 

The setup was my trusty ETX-125AT with the 40mm Plossl (48x), the 24mm TeleVue Panoptic (79x), and the 20mm Plossl used with a 2x Barlow (190x). As a warmup, I began with M44 which is increasingly lower in the sky as dusk falls. Even with the 40mm, only a major portion of the center of the cluster was visible. Then it was on to M13 with the Panoptic, not as bright as normal due to the conditions, but a significant portion of the outer fringes still visible. M92 pleased as always with its central brightness, but dimming quickly outside of the core. I must say the wide FoV of the Panoptic makes viewing very enjoyable. I made a quick comparison, switching between the 24mm Panoptic (68 degrees) vs the standard 26mm Plossl (52 degrees) and the difference was amazing; I stayed with the Panoptic on the scope until I started with the Moon.

 

Two more globular cluster highlights: M3 was excellent as always, though not as large as M13, M3 provides nearly the same core brightness as M92 spread over a larger area. Then I made an attempt for M53, in that previous attempts have always been unsuccessful. But not tonight... although it was a barely perceptible dim smudge, the fact that I could see it at all, especially in the evening's conditions was noteworthy. I felt that alone was the triumph of the evening.

 

The Moon now rising over the roofline of my home, I slewed on over. Reading an article on Posidonius on the northeastern edge of Mare Serenitatus with its cracks, irregular peaks and craterlets in its floor, I thought I'd check it out with the 20mm plus the Barlow. Bathed in high sunlight however, most of its characteristic features were washed out. So I'll save it for later closer to the next First Quarter. Next I went to the northern zone of the terminator for the evening, examining the Jula Mountains, the Kepler and Gassendi craters (a standout diamond ring with a central peak), and the snowman-shaped Hainzel crater. Schiller was barely visible in the deep south.

 

With increasing and thickening cirrus, and an empty glass of JW Double Black, it was time to pack it in. It was still an enjoyable session, especially since it may be a while until my next time out if the weather forecasters get their way!

 

Cheers, Allan


Edited by ETXer, 02 June 2020 - 06:48 AM.

 

#2153 NYJohn S

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 09:16 AM

I wasn't going to observe last night but around 10pm there were some breaks in the clouds so I set up the AT72 on the Moon. I saw a photo of Fauth + FauthA double crater and wanted to take a look at it. It's a double impact just below Copernicus. At 152x - Meade 5.5mm + 2x barlow it looked like a peanut or keyhole as both of these small craters intersected each other.

Scanning along the terminator I'd say the the highlight of the night was Crater Gassendi. It was just on the edge and dramatically lit. The light was hitting the top of the walls highlighting them and skimming across the the jagged central peaks. Gassendi A was also highlighted as it intersected the rim and the low angle of the light showed it's central peak vividly.

Just below it in Mare Humorum, craters Gassendi O & Puiseux D both looked like the head of snakes or tadpoles with long tails as waving lines followed behind them. The lines looked like they were formed by lava or the buckling of the surface. I couldn't find any references to them but they were quite pronounced.

Clavius moved out of the terminator since my last session and was lit nicely with the curving line of craters in the floor displayed nicely. Longomontanus caught my eye just above it. Another large crater with a trailing line of small craters that lead to the edge with one sitting right on top of the wall. From there I noticed what I think is an extension of the rays from Tycho. Two lines seemed to extend from crater Weiss and continue past crater Lubinezky. It looked like there was a shallow groove or depression that runs the full length between the lines. I never noticed this before.

The clouds kept moving through and I finally got tired of waiting for them to pass so I packed up. I was hoping to view some doubles but there were just too many clouds to locate any.

John


Edited by NYJohn S, 02 June 2020 - 02:50 PM.

 

#2154 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 06:23 PM

I spent Saturday night at the orange-zone Naylor Observatory.  The transparency was good but the seeing was not. It got rather chilly with temperatures dropping to the upper 40s.
 
At the moment, the observatory is only open to ASH members and members are encouraged to use their own telescopes and eyepieces.
 
I brought my 6" f/10 Celestron NexStar Evolution SCT.  It was the first time that I used this telescope somewhere other than from my driveway.  I employed a 24mm Explore Scientific 68 degree eyepiece (62x), a 17.3mm Tele Vue Delos (87x), and 8-24mm Tele Vue Click Stop zoom eyepiece (62 to 188x), and an Orion UltraBlock narrowband filter on some nebulous deep-sky objects.  The 17.3mm Delos produced some excellent views and stayed in the focuser much of the time.  The 17.3mm Delos yields almost the same true field of view as my 19mm Tele Vue Panoptic (79x) but with a more spacious apparent field of view of 72 degrees.  It is also more comfortable to use.
 
Throughout the night I observed the 60%-illuminated waxing Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, 17 Cygni, 61 Cygni, Albireo, Porrima, the Jaws asterism, the Mini-Cassiopeia asterism, the Mini-Coathanger asterism, the Stargate asterism, IC 4665, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M15, M16, M17, M18, M19, M21, M22, M23, M24, M26, M27, M29, M30, M31, M32, M39, M52, M62, M71, M80, M81, M82, M83, M92, M94, M103, M104, M106, M107, NGC 457, NGC 6210, NGC 6572, NGC 6826, NGC 6992, NGC 7009, NGC 7662, NGC 7331, and NGC 7789. 

The views of the galaxies that I was able to see early on were compromised by moonlight, of course.  The galaxies in the Virgo cluster were drowned out by the presence of the Moon.  After the Moon had set, the spiral galaxy NGC 7331 in Pegasus looked better than I had expected.  However, I was unable to see M110, although Andromeda was still quite low at the time.
 
I had particularly good views of IC 4665, M6, M7, M13, M15, M39, and M80.
 
I viewed the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Alcor-Mizar, Omicron Cygni, Collinder 399, Melotte 111, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M22, and M24 with my 12x50s.  I tracked passes by the ISS, the Lacrosse 5 satellite, and the NOSS 2-2 (D) satellite, as well.
 
I also took a number of afocal iPhone photos through the Celestron SCT.


 

#2155 Migwan

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 12:15 PM

Out last night at 22:50 to see Starlink 7,8 which was supposedly viewable at 23:08 for three minutes according to SpaceX Starlink Satellites Tracker.  Yea, I know this is old news now, but I hadn't bothered yet so...   Well, it was a bust.  Went to the edge of the field (beans this year) with my observing chair and binoculars and waited dutifully looking to the West.  I never saw them and gave up at 23:20.   

 

Was marked as new and bright at the site mentioned.  I heard that they were going to reduce the reflectivity of these satellites.  Guess it worked.

 

Other than Polaris, the little dipper didn't seem to exist last night, yet I could see the five stars of Cass rising just above the horizon.   Never witnessed this at home as my usual observing locations are blocked by a row of pine trees.   This has me thinking about converting an old trailer into a mobile observatory so I can pull it out in the field just after planting , but before germination.  Kinda nice to see the northern horizon and it wouldn't take up much crop space. 

 

Anyway, looked at the moon for awhile at 32x with the ST80.  Strawberry moon, so I heard.  Well, my June berries aren't even close here.  Perhaps that designation works somewhere to the south. 

 

Good day or night, whichever applies.

 

jd


 

#2156 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 12:59 PM

These are some of the photos that I took at the Naylor Observatory last Saturday night.  The first photograph of the Moon was taken with my Canon PowerShot SX720 HS camera.   The second photo is an afocal hand-held iPhone shot taken using my 6" Celestron SCT.  Rupes Recta (the Straight Wall) lies to the right of the terminator near the center of the image.

https://www.nasa.gov...0209-rupes.html

Attached Thumbnails

  • Celestron NexStar Evolution SCT at Naylor May 30 IMG_8842 Processed Resized 1800 CN.jpg
  • Moon May 30 IMG_8849 Processed Resized 2200 CN.jpg
  • Moon Celestron SCT May 30 Naylor IMG_5254 Processed Rotated Flipped Resized 700 CN.jpg

 

#2157 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 01:15 PM

(continued)

 

I took the first photo when the setting Moon was just above the ridgeline in the west.  The second shot shows Jupiter and Saturn to the right of the French Dome and Mars to the left.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Moon May 30-May 31 IMG_8885 Processed Resized CN.jpg
  • French Dome and the Morning Planets IMG_8900 Processed Resized CN.jpg

 

#2158 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 02:27 AM

Here's a photo of Jupiter that I took after I got home on Sunday morning.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Jupiter Home May 31st Morning IMG_8903 Processed Resized CN.jpg

 

#2159 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 02:33 AM

On Monday evening, I viewed the waxing Moon with my 6" Orion SkyQuest XT6 Dob and a 24mm Explore Scientific 68-degree (50x).  I also took a number of photographs.
 

Using my 6" f/10 Celestron NexStar Evolution SCT, I observed 61 Cygni, Albireo, Algieba, Collinder 399, IC 4665, IC 4756, M5, M11, M13, M22, M27, M57, M92, NGC 6572, and NGC 6633 using a 24mm Explore Scientific 68-degree (62x), a 17.3mm Tele Vue Delos (87x), and a 10mm Tele Vue Delos (120x).
 

I saw the waxing gibbous Moon, Alcor-Mizar, Omicron Cygni, Epsilon Lyrae, Collinder 399, IC 4665, M39, and Melotte 111 with the help of my 12x50s.  In addition, I tracked an excellent pass by the ISS and one by the Terra satellite.


 

#2160 csa/montana

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Posted 06 June 2020 - 09:18 AM

Folks, locking this thread, as it's reached over 100 pages.  Please continue to post your observations here


 


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