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First time viewing through new Orion SpaceProbe 130st

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#1 Tormentor

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 12:42 PM

I bought my first telescope last week and put it together immediately but was unable to align the finderscope due to rain and my work schedule.
Well today after the storms moved out of our area and the clouds cleared I was able to take it out to the end of my driveway and align the finderscope. Yah!
Hopefully we have a clear sky tonight so I can see how this thing works. I would love to look at Jupiter and Saturn.
Lastnight they were both shinning bright but I wasn’t ready to do any viewings hope I won’t be disappointed with this scope being that I more or less just bought it off of Amazon reviews.
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#2 Tormentor

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 12:45 PM

Sorry, if I posted this in the wrong location.

#3 Loren Gibson

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 02:40 PM

I bought the 130ST 8 years ago and still have it. For various reasons I haven't used it lately, but I have been pleased with the views that it presents. When you have an opportunity to use it, Jupiter and Saturn should look very nice through it. Good luck, and I hope you enjoy your new scope.

 

Loren


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#4 Tormentor

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Posted 18 August 2019 - 05:15 PM

Thank you, that makes me feel better with my new purchase.
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#5 aeajr

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 03:42 AM

Congratulations on your new telescope.  I wish you much success and enjoyment using it.

 

We are here to help you so ask any questions you may have and post our experiences so we can enjoy your new scope along with you.

 

I have read several reports on that scope and they seem to be generally positive so I am sure you will be successful.

 

These articles may be helpful.

 

 

How to Use a Telescope:  First Time User’s Guide
https://telescopicwa...ope-user-guide/

 

Accessories to add to your Telescope
https://telescopicwa...ls-accessories/

 

Understanding Telescope Eyepieces- There are recommendations, based on budget, but the meat of the article is about understanding the issues when selecting eyepieces.
https://telescopicwa...cope-eyepieces/


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#6 KerryR

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 08:16 AM

While I don't have a 130mm f5, I do have a 127mm f5 with a nice primary. It's one of my favorite 'scopes (among many from 50 to 406mm)-- very light and easy to mount on a light mount, yet super stable with a comfy eyepiece height and location, no stooping as with some of my refractors (I observe standing). Perfect grab and go for me. It's one of my favorites (well, really, they're all my favorites!)-- enough aperture to put up pleasing DSO views, splits most of the commonly observed doubles easily, and lovely on Jupiter, Saturn, and the Moon.

I think you made a good first scope choice. You won't be disappointed, as long as you have realistic expectations for the aperture.

 

Do learn to collimate accurately-- at f5 accurate collimation is quite critical (but it's not hard!).

Also, in case you're not familiar, the scope won't put up it's best images 'til it's had 30 or so minutes to match the air temp outside, the time varies with the degree and rate of temperature change. 'Til then, the mirror will deform slightly, and thermal currents in the light path will further blur the image a bit. Once the 'scope is "cooled", and if the atmosphere is calm (no twinkly stars), the scope should put up nice, sharp images at all reasonable magnifications!

Enjoy!

 


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#7 night observer

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 04:33 PM

I purchased this scope this year and have it set up on a tripod. I have seen m81m82 and m106. it makes a great grab and go scope to take out easily   



#8 Tormentor

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 10:37 PM

I think I jumped the gun buying this telescope now that I’ve tried using it. It is way to hard to operate.
Wish I would have read up on it more then I did.
Disappointed for sure.
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#9 Ssayer

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 07:43 AM

I think I jumped the gun buying this telescope now that I’ve tried using it. It is way to hard to operate.
Wish I would have read up on it more then I did.
Disappointed for sure.

 

What are you having a problem with operational wise? RA/DEC and Focus is about it. Line up your spotter in the daytime with a distant object so you're ready for night and have fun! Just never forget, a 130 sure isn't a Hubble...



#10 Auburn80

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:26 AM

A newtonian on a German eq mount can be a bit fiddly, especially for a novice. It will take some practice to adjust the tube orientation but before long, it'll be second nature. I wish they had packaged it with the next step up in mount but it would be more expensive.

Your package has a lot of bang for your buck so just hang in there and enjoy!

PS; please post what is disappointing or problematic. We might be able to help. There are other alternatives that you might like better but we can't say unless we hear from you.

Edited by Auburn80, 25 August 2019 - 09:39 AM.

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#11 Loren Gibson

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:36 AM

I think I jumped the gun buying this telescope now that I’ve tried using it. It is way to hard to operate.
Wish I would have read up on it more then I did.
Disappointed for sure.

 

Auburn8 is right about this scope and mount having a lot of bang for the buck. I'd like to see if we can help you overcome the issues you're having.

 

Is the difficulty you're experiencing due to the use of the German equatorial mount?

 

Loren



#12 KerryR

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:50 AM

I think I jumped the gun buying this telescope now that I’ve tried using it. It is way to hard to operate.
Wish I would have read up on it more then I did.
Disappointed for sure.

Don't give up! These are very functional and capable little scopes, in a very nicely executed package. You did NOT choose poorly!

 

As with any hobby, there's a learning process involved: Learning to set up the scope, Learning to collimate the mirrors, learning how to align/use the equatorial mount, learning to align the finder, learning what to look at, learning where in the sky to look and how to get there, learning what to expect, learning to use magnification low to high, learning "how to see", learning about atmospheric conditions,  and more. All the above can be an enjoyable part of the hobby!

 

As others have mentioned, be sure to let us know specifically what you're having difficulties/disappointments with-- we can help! Rest assured, you have a great scope. Even after 20+ years in the hobby, I still use a 130mm Newtonian more than any other, even though I own many larger and "better" scopes!

(There's always the possibility that something's wrong, too-- occasionally, bad scopes/mounts slip through the cracks, so, again, let us know what's going on!)



#13 Tormentor

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:00 PM

Thanks for the words of confidence, my issue is aligning the finder scope. I thought I had it aligned (I sighted in on a Powerline Tower between a quarter and half mile away from my house) during the day time. So I thought!
Last night I tried to view Jupiter which was shining bright in the sky. I viewed it with the finder scope then used the eye piece to look through the telescope and it wasn’t there. I could barely see it at the top right in the eye piece. I tried adjusting the focus and couldn’t bring it in view.
I now think my telescope is not aligned good enough.
I checked the collimation and it’s spot on with the collimation cap eye piece that came with it.
I may have to give alignment another go around.
I do have 1 question that I’m embarrassed to ask but will anyways. The front of my house faces south, when I set my telescope up in my garage to look at Jupiter which is to the south in the sky, for instance do I point the mount counter weight facing north? Or being that I have it polar aligned can I just set it up facing anyway I choose? Do I even make sense?
Thanks for your help. I do not want to give up on this.

#14 Sky Muse

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:01 PM

I think I jumped the gun buying this telescope now that I’ve tried using it. It is way to hard to operate.
Wish I would have read up on it more then I did.
Disappointed for sure.

I have 4", 5" and 6" short-tube reflectors, and three equatorial mounts.  I've had to renovate the mounts, and the collimation must be spot-on for the reflectors, particularly at the higher powers.

 

What problems are you having?



#15 Sky Muse

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:07 PM

Thanks for the words of confidence, my issue is aligning the finder scope. I thought I had it aligned (I sighted in on a Powerline Tower between a quarter and half mile away from my house) during the day time. So I thought!
Last night I tried to view Jupiter which was shining bright in the sky. I viewed it with the finder scope then used the eye piece to look through the telescope and it wasn’t there. I could barely see it at the top right in the eye piece. I tried adjusting the focus and couldn’t bring it in view.
I now think my telescope is not aligned good enough.
I checked the collimation and it’s spot on with the collimation cap eye piece that came with it.
I may have to give alignment another go around.
I do have 1 question that I’m embarrassed to ask but will anyways. The front of my house faces south, when I set my telescope up in my garage to look at Jupiter which is to the south in the sky, for instance do I point the mount counter weight facing north? Or being that I have it polar aligned can I just set it up facing anyway I choose? Do I even make sense?
Thanks for your help. I do not want to give up on this.

https://www.youtube....h?v=v5tfQ7v3GL0

 

Aligning the finder to the telescope is easy.  Just keep at it.



#16 Loren Gibson

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 02:52 PM

Thanks for the words of confidence, my issue is aligning the finder scope. I thought I had it aligned (I sighted in on a Powerline Tower between a quarter and half mile away from my house) during the day time. So I thought!
Last night I tried to view Jupiter which was shining bright in the sky. I viewed it with the finder scope then used the eye piece to look through the telescope and it wasn’t there. I could barely see it at the top right in the eye piece. I tried adjusting the focus and couldn’t bring it in view.
I now think my telescope is not aligned good enough.
I checked the collimation and it’s spot on with the collimation cap eye piece that came with it.
I may have to give alignment another go around.
I do have 1 question that I’m embarrassed to ask but will anyways. The front of my house faces south, when I set my telescope up in my garage to look at Jupiter which is to the south in the sky, for instance do I point the mount counter weight facing north? Or being that I have it polar aligned can I just set it up facing anyway I choose? Do I even make sense?
Thanks for your help. I do not want to give up on this.

 

Regarding the finder scope alignment, it sounds like you had it "close, but no cigar" if you sighted Jupiter through the finder scope and it was just at or a little outside the field of view in the scope. This might occur if the daytime target you selected was a little too close, and/or you didn't have the object precisely centered in the field of view prior to adjusting the finder, and/or you may have accidentally nudged the scope with the clamps off (or only very lightly tighted, although they needn't be extremely tight, just snugged down) while adjusting the finder. Been there, done that. After adjusting the finder, double check the main optics to make sure the target is still centered there.

 

Then, the next time you sight Jupiter through the finder, and it's just at the edge of the field of view, use the mount's slow motions to center Jupiter in the field of view, then look through the finder and tweak its alignment. That should fix the finder scope alignment problem.

 

Regarding collimation of the main optics, it sounds like you're satisfied with it at this time, so the only thing I'll say is that if you ever recollimate, and have to make a "big" change in the mirrors' positions for alignment, re-check your finder scope alignment afterward. It might need a bit of tweaking.

 

For the mount's polar alignment, you want to have the polar axis pointed at (or near, "close enough") the north celestial pole in the northern sky, near Polaris. This will place the counterweight bar on the north side of the mount.

 

In theory, you can set up the mount with the polar axis pointed any which way, and no Imperial Storm Troopers will bother you for doing that, but you'll spend much more effort tracking astronomical objects because you'll have to make liberal use of slow motion controls in both axes to track, and you'll likely run out of declination slow motion at some point. That will require you to re-center the declination slow motion mechanism and re-sight the object through the finder scope again. So, don't set up the mount any which-way, for your own sanity. smile.gif  It's well worth the time to learn to align the polar axis to be parallel to the Earth's axis of rotation, and after a few times will be second nature to you.

 

Let us know how the next attempt goes!

 

Loren


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#17 Tormentor

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 03:58 PM

Thank you for the pointers. I will do as you said tonight as long as I have a clear sky. Fingers crossed.
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#18 Tormentor

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 06:01 PM

I just went outside and sighted the telescope in on a water tower about a half mile away as you said and then aligned the cross hairs on the finderscope to it also.
Let’s hope for clear skies tonight so I can see if it works.

Unfortunately it’s too cloudy for any viewing tonight.

Edited by Tormentor, 25 August 2019 - 08:43 PM.

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#19 ReflectoMundo5972

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 03:14 PM

Hi Tormentor :   I went out today before noon and target an object at about 2 and half blocks, after reading your post, and reviewing the instructions from Ken (Orion Instructor)  i performed the procedure backwards,  Beginners of Beginners, I was able to line the viewer and the finder scopes somewhat close about 3 to 4 feet, but I believe I need to perform the steps one more time.  Fun and Enjoying!

 

Hope you had another chance to spot your first Outer Matter



#20 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 04:41 PM

Hi:

 

I had a SpaceProbe 130 ST for maybe 10 years. I considered a hidden treasure, optically it's like a "half pint 10 inch Dob." It provided me with some wonderful views.. 

 

Hang in there..

 

Jon


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#21 ReflectoMundo5972

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 01:29 PM

Congratulations on your new telescope. I wish you much success and enjoyment using it.

We are here to help you so ask any questions you may have and post our experiences so we can enjoy your new scope along with you.

I have read several reports on that scope and they seem to be generally positive so I am sure you will be successful.

These articles may be helpful.


How to Use a Telescope: First Time User’s Guide
https://telescopicwa...ope-user-guide/

Accessories to add to your Telescope
https://telescopicwa...ls-accessories/

Understanding Telescope Eyepieces- There are recommendations, based on budget, but the meat of the article is about understanding the issues when selecting eyepieces.
https://telescopicwa...cope-eyepieces/



#22 ReflectoMundo5972

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 01:30 PM

Thanks for sharing your knowledge will definitely take advantage

#23 ReflectoMundo5972

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 01:43 PM

I just went outside and sighted the telescope in on a water tower about a half mile away as you said and then aligned the cross hairs on the finderscope to it also.
Let’s hope for clear skies tonight so I can see if it works.

Unfortunately it’s too cloudy for any viewing tonight.



#24 ReflectoMundo5972

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 01:55 PM

Hi glad to follow your post, I went out before noon on Wednesday, and align the scopes, I used our airport tower as point of focal point (more an specific at a light fixture that was a sticking off to its northern side) the distance was about 3 and Half blocks away +\- half a block, beginner also a step behind you haven’t had a chance to point at the cloudy skies l, Anxious For Sure 🙄

#25 Tormentor

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Posted 30 August 2019 - 09:26 PM

Hopefully the skies will be clear this weekend, I’m itching to see if my adjustments helped.


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