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Is my telescope not setup properly or am I expecting too much?

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#1 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:51 PM

A few years ago my husband bought me a Celestron NexStar 8SE for Christmas.  The reviews were great – people got it out of the box and bam! Great images of planets immediately.
We put the scope together and I tried and tried to get the alignment to work but never could.  I read the manual 100 times, looked on the Celestron website, watched you-tube videos, but absolutely NO luck.  So, it's been a beautiful piece of artwork in the corner of my living room since then.
Last week a Celestron StarSense Automatic Alignment Telescope Accessory popped up as a facebook ad.  I ordered it immediately from Amazon and installed it the night I got it.  I had read reviews to download the firmware updates to it, so I did that.  It worked!  I finally have alignment! 

I have seen so many pictures taken using this telescope.  I was so excited to use the Sky Tour - hoping to see something spectacular.  The stars were located and I can see them clearly through the 25mm eyepiece that came with the scope.  But they aren't any bigger than what I can see without the scope.  Same with the planets.  Mars is located quickly, but is just a tiny white spec in the middle of the eyepiece surrounded by a bunch of other stars.  Nothing like these pictures I see other people post.

I watched more you-tube videos, and ordered the Celestron Eyepiece and Filter kit, thinking maybe I needed a different lens.   It came with 5 lenses and a Barlow lens.
Last night, I changed batteries (to be sure this wasn't an issue) and I used the Barlow lens with both my original 25mm lens and one of my new ones, a 32mm lens.  And I tried the 32mm lens by itself.
Mars is located, galaxies are located, even Saturn, but everything is just a crystal clear tiny white dot in the middle of the eyepiece surrounded by other stars.

I googled more and more and found the link to this forum.  I spent probably 5 hours reading through advice given by the members here and also looking at images taken with this scope in particular. (this is an awesome site and I wish I had found it years ago!)

After investing another $500 in this scope in the past week, I’m so discouraged.  It seems to work, but there is absolutely no magnification to make anything appear as I expected.  I am not interested in attaching a camera yet, I just want to see the images of planets and stars as more than tiny pinpricks of light.  Any advice?  Or thoughts? Am I expecting too much, or am I still missing a part or component ?



#2 555aaa

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:59 PM

What does the moon look like through it?



#3 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:05 PM

Since I got it aligned this week, the moon has not been visible until around 2:00 a.m., so I haven't been able to view it yet.  I had manually tried to view it prior to getting the alignment to work and the new lenses and did not see much detail. 



#4 starbuckin

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:08 PM

Saturn should look great through an 8 inch. Are you sure you are looking at Saturn.

 

The goto usually puts you close to the object, but unless the polar alignment is spot on, you may have to hunt around for it.

Can you see the ring and moons?

What eyepiece are you using?


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#5 S.Boerner

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:09 PM

One of the big problems for beginners is knowing what to look for.  There should be a "night's best" on your hand controller.  But rather than that I'm going to suggest that you download this month's SkyMap at http://www.skymaps.com/  It is a two page pdf.  On the front is a typical looking sky map.  On the back there's a list that suggests the best naked eye, binocular, and telescope targets for the month's evening viewing.  Everything on the back is labeled on the front. 

 

You should be able to do gotos on most of the items if your scope is aligned. It will probably be good practice finding where things are in your hand controller...stars, binary stars, deep sky objects, planets, etc.

 

The SkyMap should mention a number of deep sky objects (DSOs) that are well placed, particularly if you have a good view to the south.  Nothing on the SkyMap's list should be impossible for your 8" scope.


Edited by S.Boerner, 19 August 2019 - 02:10 PM.

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#6 starbuckin

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:09 PM

Your scope is likely out of collimation if the moon detail was bad.

Google sct collimation. Its easy to do..


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#7 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:19 PM

Saturn should look great through an 8 inch. Are you sure you are looking at Saturn.

 

The goto usually puts you close to the object, but unless the polar alignment is spot on, you may have to hunt around for it.

Can you see the ring and moons?

What eyepiece are you using?

yes, it put me close and I used the arrows on the hand control to center it. I'm also using an app called SkyView Lite to help me confirm the scope's finding.  But everything is just so tiny - even Saturn.  Little bitty spec in the middle of the eyepiece (it is a crystal clear spec though) but surrounded by 100s of stars.  I used the Barlow lens with both my original 25mm lens and one of my new ones, a 32mm lens.  And I tried the 32mm lens by itself.



#8 GamesForOne

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:20 PM

The Celestron EP kit has 32mm, 17mm, 13mm, 8mm, and 6mm Plossl eyepieces (EPs). The smaller the number, the greater the magnification in your telescope.

 

The focal length of the 8" Nexstar f/10 tube is 2032 mm. Divide that by the eyepiece focal length, for example, the 17mm EP will yield 2032/17 = 120x. That should be more than enough that you see a disk for Saturn and Jupiter. If you do not see a disk, then the planet is not in the field. The 13mm, 8mm and 6mm EPs will show an even larger disk, but at the expensive of a dimmer image with a progressively narrowing field of view.

 

If you use a 2x barlow, then you multiply the magnification in the above paragraph by 2, for example 2032/17x2 = 240x. You said you tried the 25mm EP with the barlow? As another post says below, that is 163x which should be plenty of magnification to see a disk with some detail for Saturn and Jupiter, provided that the seeing is decent and your scope is not grossly out of collimation. When you defocus a bright star, do you see a donut shape, i.e. a round bright circular ring with a dark shadow in the center?

 

At this time, Mars is very small (and too close to the the Sun!) and requires a lot of magnification to see a disk. It gets larger when it approaches Earth at other times in its orbit.

 

That said, please note that increasing magnification will require good tracking from your mount or the planet will just drift out of the field of view. You also have to fight vibrations that will increase with higher magnifications, especially as you touch the focuser. It takes patience and practice to observe planets at high magnifications.

 

Furthermore, you will notice that the Plossl EPs have smaller and smaller eye lens as the focal length gets shorter. This is an unfortunate aspect of that particular EP design. It is possible to purchase short focal length EPs that have larger eye lens with more "eye relief", meaning that you don't have to put your eye right on the lens to try to see the field. Such premium single EPs can cost as much or more as your Celestron kit.

 

In any case, what you will see visually will never compare with photos. Photos are enlarged, contrast-enhanced, and also post-processed to remove the effects of "seeing" where the air can be turbulent compared to visually observing. Bad seeing (i.e. turbulent air) will cause the image to appear wavy and blurry. You have to be patient for the right conditions and even fleeting moments when the air gets steady.

 

Hope that helps,

---

Michael Mc


Edited by GamesForOne, 19 August 2019 - 02:30 PM.

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#9 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:23 PM

One of the big problems for beginners is knowing what to look for.  There should be a "night's best" on your hand controller.  But rather than that I'm going to suggest that you download this month's SkyMap at http://www.skymaps.com/  It is a two page pdf.  On the front is a typical looking sky map.  On the back there's a list that suggests the best naked eye, binocular, and telescope targets for the month's evening viewing.  Everything on the back is labeled on the front. 

 

You should be able to do gotos on most of the items if your scope is aligned. It will probably be good practice finding where things are in your hand controller...stars, binary stars, deep sky objects, planets, etc.

 

The SkyMap should mention a number of deep sky objects (DSOs) that are well placed, particularly if you have a good view to the south.  Nothing on the SkyMap's list should be impossible for your 8" scope.

thank you for the link.  I'll print that out as reference.  I also did use the 'night's best' on the controller.  when the scope finds an object, it centers it, but there does not seem to be any magnification (or at least not what I expect).  I think that is my main concern - lack of magnification.  



#10 PPPPPP42

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:23 PM

A 25mm+2x barlow in that OTA is 163x

My 9mm was my preferred planetary eyepiece when I was still using my CPC800 and thats 226x

 

Seeing (look that up if you dont know) or low altitude in the sky (the higher the better) are the likely culprits for the planets being washed out white looking though collimation is also a possibility (but its not like these are dobs or anything) but lack of magnification is her primary issue here when describing everything as a boring white dot.

 

Mars is somewhat hard to get good detail on without really good seeing and more magnification.

 

Jupiter with good seeing at 200x or better lets you see the stripes and the moons will be 4 obvious bright looking stars in a line around it (depending on position) and saturn you can see some banding on the planet and the cassini division (the big black gap in its rings.  With crap seeing Jupiter is mostly whitish and saturn is mostly yellow though you can still clearly see the rings.

 

Do keep in mind that 8" takes an annoying amount of time to settle down to ambient temperature which is needed to get a clear view.  If the planet is hula dancing around in the view you may not have let it cool enough or you are looking through too much crap atmosphere.

 

EDIT: In hindsight I just reviewed what the magnification on my new refractor is with the same eyepieces and I can see the cassini division and stripes on jupiter even at 106x though they are tiny looking.

I am going with crap seeing, and low altitude but you need more magnification to make them easier to see.


Edited by PPPPPP42, 19 August 2019 - 02:27 PM.


#11 bobzeq25

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:25 PM

A few years ago my husband bought me a Celestron NexStar 8SE for Christmas.  The reviews were great – people got it out of the box and bam! Great images of planets immediately.
We put the scope together and I tried and tried to get the alignment to work but never could.  I read the manual 100 times, looked on the Celestron website, watched you-tube videos, but absolutely NO luck.  So, it's been a beautiful piece of artwork in the corner of my living room since then.
Last week a Celestron StarSense Automatic Alignment Telescope Accessory popped up as a facebook ad.  I ordered it immediately from Amazon and installed it the night I got it.  I had read reviews to download the firmware updates to it, so I did that.  It worked!  I finally have alignment! 

I have seen so many pictures taken using this telescope.  I was so excited to use the Sky Tour - hoping to see something spectacular.  The stars were located and I can see them clearly through the 25mm eyepiece that came with the scope.  But they aren't any bigger than what I can see without the scope.  Same with the planets.  Mars is located quickly, but is just a tiny white spec in the middle of the eyepiece surrounded by a bunch of other stars.  Nothing like these pictures I see other people post.

I watched more you-tube videos, and ordered the Celestron Eyepiece and Filter kit, thinking maybe I needed a different lens.   It came with 5 lenses and a Barlow lens.
Last night, I changed batteries (to be sure this wasn't an issue) and I used the Barlow lens with both my original 25mm lens and one of my new ones, a 32mm lens.  And I tried the 32mm lens by itself.
Mars is located, galaxies are located, even Saturn, but everything is just a crystal clear tiny white dot in the middle of the eyepiece surrounded by other stars.

I googled more and more and found the link to this forum.  I spent probably 5 hours reading through advice given by the members here and also looking at images taken with this scope in particular. (this is an awesome site and I wish I had found it years ago!)

After investing another $500 in this scope in the past week, I’m so discouraged.  It seems to work, but there is absolutely no magnification to make anything appear as I expected.  I am not interested in attaching a camera yet, I just want to see the images of planets and stars as more than tiny pinpricks of light.  Any advice?  Or thoughts? Am I expecting too much, or am I still missing a part or component ?

The following is talking about Deep Space Objects, like clusters, nebulae, and galaxies.

 

DSO astrophotography is a _completely_ different thing than visual astronomy.  People simply don't realize that, and two bad things happen.

 

One is they're very disappointed by what they see, compared to the images they've seen.

 

The other is that they slap a camera on the back of a nice visual scope, and expect to start shooting nice images.  Nothing could be farther from the truth, and they'll also be disappointed with that.

 

It's not so much that the camera is _better_ than your eyes, as it is it's _different_.  Your eyes are very short exposure.  They need a big scope to gather light fast, and even then you'll never see what an image from a small scope shows.

 

The camera can sit there patiently, accumulating tiny amounts of light for hours.  _Provided_ (and it's a very big issue) you can keep it very precisely pointed at the same target for a long time.  And the target moves.  If there's less than 1/1000 of an inch of error, your image vanishes.

 

Your eyes, hooked to a smart brain, can ignore some motion.

 

If you want to start taking images, forget everything you know about visual astronomy.  Definitely forget the big scope, for DSOs.  It's not important (and it will mess you up), the mount is the important part of a DSO imaging setup.  Even a $2000 mount is not good enough, you have to add a feedback loop called autoguiding.  A separate scope/camera watches a guide star.  When it moves the computer sends a correction to the mount.

 

The other thing that's way different is that you use a computer to intensively process the data you get from the camera.  You're teasing a tiny signal from a sea of noise.  Figure some hours to do that.  And many more hours of study learning how.

 

The pretty pictures do not come easy.  <smile>

 

If you want to start taking DSO images get this book.  It takes you through the learning process, starting with just a camera and a lens.  When you want to move up to a scope, you'll need the setup seen by scrolling down to the picture of the very expert author.  Good mount, small refractor.

 

Nothing at all like visual.

 

http://www.astropix....bgda/index.html


Edited by bobzeq25, 19 August 2019 - 02:32 PM.

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#12 afernald

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:26 PM

As Michael said, try looking at Saturn and Jupiter with various eyepieces, starting with the lowest magnification. The disc should get larger with possibly more detail. If the magnification is too high for the sky conditions, the disc will get blurry. Try to observe when the planets are highest in the sky and the air isn't turbulent. Be patient and watch for moments when the air is steady. Post your results and let us know what you see. Your images will probably not match pictures, but remember you're seeing the real planet as it appears at that very moment. That's really quite exciting! David.


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#13 jimr2

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:27 PM

Samantha,

Hi, sorry you've had so many problems trying to use your new/old 'scope! Basically I don't think there's anything wrong with the scope, you just need to be aware of what kinds of magnifications you need to use on the planets in order to be able to see them as anything other than little white dots. You can determine the magnification (or "power",expressed as "X") of a specific eyepiece you're using by dividing it's focal length (fl) into the focal length of the telescope it's being used in, so that for example, your 25 mm eyepiece that I assume came with your scope, will produce a magnification of approx. 81X, as your telescope has a focal length of 2032mm (you should see that number engraved/painted around the front edge of the glass corrector lens on the front of your scope). So dividing 2032 by 25 equals 81.28X. Then using your new 32 mm eyepiece as another example, if your divide the 2032mm by 32mm, you get a magnification of 63.5X. In other words, I believe you are going the wrong way in magnification in trying to observe the planets--or the Moon as 555 above asked. And while 81X should be a high enough magnification to start seeing some of the larger/brighter planets like Jupiter and Saturn in some detail, that's probably not high enough to see very much detail on them, so if you have some shorter focal length eyepieces, like a 20mm, or a 15 or 12mm, for example, you should "see" better results using those on the planets, as long as the atmosphere is clear and relatively steady on those nights you try to observe them. There's a limit of course, on how high of magnification you can go with a 'scope of a specific size (diameter), and I'm not sure what that is with your 8" Nexstar. But I'm pretty sure that you could get away using a 12mm eyepiece on it most decent nights, and perhaps even a slightly shorter length eyepiece (like a 10 or 9mm) on some really good clear, steady nights. The 12mm will result in a mag. of 169X on your scope.

If trying these shorter length eyepieces you still cannot see anything but a fuzzy white dot, then perhaps the scope is not well focused for celestial viewing? Again as 555aaa suggested above, try looking at the Moon with your scope and different eyepieces and focusing well on it, then turning the scope onto a planet--you should not really have to change the focus between the two.

Other than this, that's about all I can suggest at this time Samantha. Hope this helps and hope you start seeing things in the night sky a lot better soon!

P.S. mars is always a difficult target--it basically looks like just an orange fuzzball in any amateur telescope, until/unless you're talking about really big scopes, and when Mars is closest to Earth, which it isn't currently. again, good luck!

-jim-
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#14 Kyphoron

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:31 PM

Samantha,

 

  My best advice to you would be to seek out an astronomy club in your area and bring your scope with you. They can check it out and see if there is anything wrong with it or if your expectations are to high for what you thought you would see. We here are all just guessing and without actually visually looking through your scope the best we can do is guess.

 

  Part of being a visual observer is training your eyes to pick out small details in what you are viewing. But one thing for certain even in a low power eyepiece you should be seeing Saturn's rings easily.


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#15 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:31 PM

The Celestron EP kit has 32mm, 17mm, 13mm, 8mm, and 6mm Plossl eyepieces (EPs). The smaller the number, the greater the magnification in your telescope.

 

The focal length of the 8" Nexstar f/10 tube is 2032 mm. Divide that by the eyepiece focal length, for example, the 17mm EP will yield 2032/17 = 120x. That should be more than enough that you see a disk for Saturn and Jupiter. If you do not see a disk, then the planet is not in the field. The 13mm, 8mm and 6mm EPs will show an even larger disk, but at the expensive of a dimmer image with a progressively narrowing field of view.

 

At this time, Mars is very small (and too close to the the Sun!) and requires a lot of magnification to see a disk. It gets larger when it approaches Earth at other times in its orbit.

 

That said, please note that increasing magnification will require good tracking from your mount or the planet will just drift out of the field of view. You also have to fight vibrations that will increase with higher magnifications, especially as you touch the focuser. It takes patience and practice to observe planets at high magnifications.

 

Furthermore, you will notice that the Plossl EPs have smaller and smaller eye lens as the focal length gets shorter. This is an unfortunate aspect of that particular EP design. It is possible to purchase short focal length EPs that have larger eye lens with more "eye relief", meaning that you don't have to put your eye right on the lens to try to see the field. Such premium single EPs can cost as much or more as your Celestron kit.

 

In any case, what you will see visually will never compare with photos. Photos are enlarged and also post-processed to remove the effects of "seeing" where the air can be turbulent compared to visually observing. Bad seeing (i.e. turbulent air) will cause the image to appear wavy and blurry. You have to be patient for the right conditions and even fleeting moments when the air gets steady.

 

Hope that helps,

---

Michael Mc

thank you, thank you, thank you!  I will try the lower number magnification lenses next.  but you are right - those are teeny tiny eye holes. :)  If those work, I will look into the short focal length EP with a larger eye lens.  Is there one in particular that you'd recommend?



#16 S.Boerner

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:32 PM

Some additional thoughts...

If you are anywhere a large city there's probably an astronomy club.  Clubs frequently hold public viewing events and offer help to beginners.  While it isn't a complete list the Astronomical League lists about 300 clubs here:  https://www.astrolea...clubs-usa-state

 

Generally start with your longest focal length eyepiece (the one with the biggest number...32mm).  It will be much easier to find and center your target because gotos are not always perfect.  Once centered you can swap to progressively shorter focal lengths (bigger numbers).

 

Deep sky objects will tend to be better with your longer focal length eyepieces.  Planets will tend to be better with more magnification thus your shorter focal length eyepieces BUT work your way down to them so the planet can be centered.

 

Magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of your telescope by the focal length of your eyepiece.  Your scope is about 2000mm so for your 32mm eyepiece 2000/32 = 62.5x.  If you have a 10mm eyepiece it would be 2000/10 = 200x  and that would make Saturn much bigger although it won't come anywhere close to filling the eyepiece.  Using a 2x barlow doubles those number.  HOWEVER sometimes there's turbulence in the sky that causes what is known as poor/bad seeing (do the stars twinkle...poor seeing) and too much magnification doesn't really help there.  Under the best cases of sky you might be able to get 60xaperture in inches of magnification...for you 480x would be about max for your scope.  If you have five eyepieces you probably aren't going to need the barlow.


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#17 starbuckin

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:33 PM

If she hasn't used the scope in a few years, I'm guessing the collimation is bad. She said the moon looked blurry.

 

I would start with collimating the scope, and viewing the moon. You should see excellent detail. Then try Saturn. Saturn in a 9mm. (or your barlow'd 24) should look excellent.

 

Don't give up! A little effort will pay off big. It's an excellent telescope!


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#18 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:37 PM

Samantha,

 

  My best advice to you would be to seek out an astronomy club in your area and bring your scope with you. They can check it out and see if there is anything wrong with it or if your expectations are to high for what you thought you would see. We here are all just guessing and without actually visually looking through your scope the best we can do is guess.

 

  Part of being a visual observer is training your eyes to pick out small details in what you are viewing. But one thing for certain even in a low power eyepiece you should be seeing Saturn's rings easily.

I live in the middle of nowhere northeast Georgia, or I would be all over joining an astronomy club! :)   

But now that I understand 'lower is more power', I'm excited to try again. 



#19 GamesForOne

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:44 PM

thank you, thank you, thank you!  I will try the lower number magnification lenses next.  but you are right - those are teeny tiny eye holes. smile.gif  If those work, I will look into the short focal length EP with a larger eye lens.  Is there one in particular that you'd recommend?

I made a couple more edits on my post above as well.

 

Recommending EPs is a dangerous business because it is such a personal preference. Other things come into play such as whether you wear glasses, if you have astigmatism correction, eye socket shape, etc.

 

As suggested by a poster above, the best approach would be to find an astronomy club and do some observing with others. If you find a view that is comfortable and pleasing, inquire as to what type of EP is being used.

 

However, my personal preference for high magnification viewing with my glasses is the Pentax XW series. These can run about $300 new for a single EP. Other premium options include Televue Delos and Baader Morpheus. These all have very large eye lenses and excellent eye relief, but are costly.

 

A budget option would be the Orion Expanse series ($50 each). Maybe others can suggest more budget options that would provide a more comfortable view than the "like looking through a straw" Possls.  lol.gif

 

Oh... and try not to look over a hot roof while observing. The heat off that roof will play havoc with the images. The view will be extremely blurry and wavy. In the south, looking over a body of water or on a mountain ridge just after sunset can provide the steadiest views.

 

---

Michael Mc


Edited by GamesForOne, 19 August 2019 - 02:53 PM.

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#20 Samantha66

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:48 PM

A 25mm+2x barlow in that OTA is 163x

My 9mm was my preferred planetary eyepiece when I was still using my CPC800 and thats 226x

 

Seeing (look that up if you dont know) or low altitude in the sky (the higher the better) are the likely culprits for the planets being washed out white looking though collimation is also a possibility (but its not like these are dobs or anything) but lack of magnification is her primary issue here when describing everything as a boring white dot.

 

Mars is somewhat hard to get good detail on without really good seeing and more magnification.

 

Jupiter with good seeing at 200x or better lets you see the stripes and the moons will be 4 obvious bright looking stars in a line around it (depending on position) and saturn you can see some banding on the planet and the cassini division (the big black gap in its rings.  With crap seeing Jupiter is mostly whitish and saturn is mostly yellow though you can still clearly see the rings.

 

Do keep in mind that 8" takes an annoying amount of time to settle down to ambient temperature which is needed to get a clear view.  If the planet is hula dancing around in the view you may not have let it cool enough or you are looking through too much crap atmosphere.

 

EDIT: In hindsight I just reviewed what the magnification on my new refractor is with the same eyepieces and I can see the cassini division and stripes on jupiter even at 106x though they are tiny looking.

I am going with crap seeing, and low altitude but you need more magnification to make them easier to see.

I had read in one of the forum posts about the temperature being an issue, so I left the scope in the garage all day and evening before going out to try again last night.  (I had forgotten that tidbit of info from the user manual).  We live in the middle of the country with no city lights or streets to interfere.  I start setting everything up around 9:00 pm, and do a few pre-alignment checks, but around 10:00 pm is when I start looking for specific objects.  I'm hopeful the lower magnification lenses will make the objects bigger.  If not, I'll look further into the collimation (although that intimidates me a bit right now). 



#21 sg6

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:56 PM

What you need is a list of a few reasonable sized targets.

Jupiter and Saturn are now moving away so appear small and they are in general low - would you add a city/state whatever to your profile. Really helps.

 

Saturn needs at present something like 150x, as the scope is basically 2000mm then 150x means a 13mm eyepiece. Which sits in the middle of a 12mm and a 15mm.

 

Also 150x should be reasonably attainable in the scope.

 

Other targets - try M13 and M92, you can also have a look at Albireo and Almaak - 2 double stars of contrasting color.

 

For an 8SE you will need longer focal length eyepieces, simply to get a reasonable field of view at the eyepiece. So keep the magnification down.

 

Not sure what eyepieces you have but a 32mm plossl is about as wide as easily achievable. Maybe get one if you do not already have.

 

Maybe try for M33 Triagulum Galaxy. M31 Andromeda is too big, way too big for the scope.

Should get M57, Ring nebula, with the scope also.

Another is try the double double star system in Lyra. That is also where M57 is.


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#22 wrnchhead

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 03:01 PM

Firstly though, moving from a 25mm eyepiece to a 32mm eyepiece is a decrease in magnification. You will want to use a shorter eyepiece (smaller number) to increase the magnification. (focal length of your scope is 2032mm divided by eyepiece, the 25mm is 81x, the 32mm is 63x) In my C8 I generally use around a 15mm or shorter for planetary viewing (conditions are everything here though). Where are you viewing from (roughly, your latitude) 

 

The moon test is a good one, your report on viewing it makes me wonder if you really got a good look. 

 

Lastly in this sea of advice, don't give up! That's a great and capable scope, and the learning curve can be somewhat steep. It gets easier every time. Tempering your expectations is a good start also, those Hubble pictures on the internet can make expectations (too) high. 



#23 afernald

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 03:05 PM

I suspect your telescope is OK so don't worry about collimation yet. Just take your time and observe various objects with different magnifications. Find a comfortable stance with your feet apart (or sit if you have the right chair) and relax. Remember increasing magnification won't change the apparent size of stars. Magnification makes double stars look farther apart and increases the size of extended objects like planets and star clusters. Try Albireo (a double star with nice colors), and M13 (a globular cluster). For dim objects, use averted vision by looking to the left or right of the object. Good luck! David.


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#24 Napp

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 03:18 PM

Here is a list of the astronomy clubs in Georgia.  https://www.skyandte...title&order=asc

Even if the club’s address doesn’t seem close you may not be far from the club’s dark sky site.

 

Also, the 2019 Peach State Star Gaze will be held at Deerlick Astronomy Village in northeast Georgia October 20-27.  https://atlantaastro...SGO/index1.html

 

Nothing beats getting hands on help from experienced observers.


Edited by Napp, 19 August 2019 - 03:21 PM.

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#25 Migwan

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 03:34 PM

Agree that you should catch a Star Party or Outreach. 

 

This notion is unlikely, but just in case I'll bring it up.   Is there any chance you have a focal reducer in place?

 

That would be an extra lens placed between the visual back and the diagonal.   Google .63 Celestron Focal Reducer to get an image of one.   If so, take that off when viewing planets or use higher powers.

 

Good luck

 

jd 


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