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Beginner - and considering becoming an Ender....

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#1 MissMac22

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:06 PM

Hi all, frustrated beginner here.
I have a Saxon 1206AZ4 Refractor Telescope and am trying to get a closer view of the moon. Closer and still a bit clear if possible.
I asked for help on another thread and got a lot of advice for which I am thankful but in all honesty it confused me even more. I am beginning to see that using a telescope isn't as simple as I was hoping it to be.
Whilst I can see the moon clearly and in its entirety, using a 2x Barlow and a 25mm Plossl lens, I cannot get it to forward focus enough to see the moon clearly - with and without the diagonal/Barlow or anything I had, so I bought, under suggestion from the shop that I bought my scope from, (online - I live in a small town on an island) an 8mm wide scope and a fine tuning ring.
I have no idea how or where the fine tuner ring is meant to fit. Can anyone help?
I tried the 8mm lens by itself and I still cannot forward focus enough to even make out the moon... it's just a bright blur.
Another thing I'd like to know... when looking at stars thru the scope, as I bought it, using either the 25mm Plossl or the 10mm Plossl and no diagonal or Barlow... I see the stars and just more stars that I obviously can't see with the naked eye... but it's just more stars, no planets as such... is that right? Or should I be able to see the likes of Jupiter... far off but still as a planet and not as a star?
Hope someone can help as I am now thinking I have bought a way to expensive "ornament".

Many thanks.
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#2 Napp

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:20 PM

You are a person in need of hands on help.  Get to an astronomy club outreach event or star party.  Or at least contact a club and ask about sessions that offer help.  I am in two clubs and both are eager to help beginners and anyone else needing help with the hobby.  

 

https://www.skyandte...-organizations/


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#3 GoFish

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:33 PM

Hi, and welcome. 

 

It seems very unlikely that you are being prevented from reaching focus because you can’t move the eyepiece inward far enough. And by inward, I mean moving the eyepiece closer to the far end of the scope where the big lens (the objective) is mounted. 

 

Rather, it seems more likely that the eyepiece needs to move outward more. 

 

Probably the designers of the scope had in mind that the diagonal would be in place when viewing. So I think you should use the provided diagonal while trying to reach focus. 

 

Also, for now, do not use the Barlow. Let’s try and get things working in the most basic configuration. Once that’s done, we can work on mucking things up with accessories. 

 

Insert the diagonal into the focuser, and then the 25mm eyepiece into the diagonal. Point the scope at the moon. Crank the focuser all the way out, i.e., move the eyepiece outward as far as possible. Then slowly crank the focuser inward until it comes into focus. 

 

If it never comes into focus this way, then there is a problem that can be solved once we know where the prime focus point lies.

 

With the scope still pointed at the moon, remove the eyepiece and diagonal. Crank the focuser all the way inward. Get a piece of paper and let the moon project through the empty focuser on to the paper. Move the paper away from the focuser until the projected image of the moon is in focus. Measure the distance from the paper to the end of the telescope tube (or any other fixed reference) and record it. 

 

The “optical path”, which includes the diagonal and the extended focuser tube, but not the eyepiece, has to be about the same total length as you just measured for an eyepiece to come into focus. Probably the focuser, by itself, is not long enough. Most scopes like yours need either the diagonal or an extension tube to reach focus. 


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#4 ButterFly

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:33 PM

If by "forward focus" you mean bringing the eyepiece closer to the objective lens, then a fine tuning ring is the exact opposite of what you want.  Fine tuning rings screw on to the filter side of the eyepiece and make the barrel longer so the eyepiece is further away from the objective.  Are you sure it's the toward objective direction that the eyepiece needs to go?  You can pull the eyepiece outward to make sure it's not the away from the objecctive direction.

 

An f/5 120mm refractor is rather demanding of eyepieces. 

 

Diagonals always add length to the optical path for a given amount of fouser tube withdrawn.  How much more depends on the design and size.  Tell us more about that diagonal (with pictures if possible).  Is it a mirror or prism and is it 2" or 1.25"? 


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#5 Gary Z

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 06:59 PM

Look, you have a good sized telescope.  This will be great for viewing the moon  (use a lunar filter to minimize the color aberration.  For planets like Jupiter, Not sure what eyepiece.  Can you locate Jupiter or Saturn in the sky?  If so, is your finderscope aligned to your telescope, meaning when you look at an object with your finderscope, the object you see centered in the finderscope should be the same object in your telescope, only bigger.  If you have not aligned your finderscope, please align your finderscope using a pole a fair distance away, first using your 25mm plossl eyepice, then try again with your 10mm eyepiece.  Then try on the moon, or bright star.  Once you do this, you'll be able to put your target object first thru the finderscope and look thru your telescope and focus and observe the target.  Your mount seems to be stable enough.  

 

If you can, as Napp suggested reach out to as local an astronomy club as you can, you'll not only get assistance, but hands on help that will allow you to get the most out of your telescope and mount.  But those eyepieces should reveal the planets of saturn and Jupiter ok, especially the 10mm without the barlow.  Granted, it would be cool to use the barlow.  Are you in Australia?  This is where I found the mount and scope that you have.  

Did you buy this new?  If so, and a club isn't an option for you, then I highly suggest you contact the vendor your purchased the scope or at least the company as it claims to have a 5 year warranty.  Jupiter and Saturn viewing, if you are in Australia should be quite nice as they will be higher in the sky than here in the US.  

 

Gary


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#6 cookjaiii

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 08:38 PM

I had a 100mm f/6 Orion refractor that came with a 2" diagonal.  When I tried to use it with a 2" to 1.25" adapter and 1.25" eyepieces, it didn't have enough in-travel to reach focus with some of my eyepieces.  

 

The fix was to ditch the 2" diagonal and use a 1.25" diagonal instead.  This shortened the light path enough to reach focus.


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#7 Bowlerhat

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:23 PM

Few days ago someone had a similar problem, exactly able to focus with eyepiece but not with barlow. The scope he was using is 60mm with 700mm focal length. Both his and your scope should be able to do well with barlow, theoritically.

 

He removed the diagonal and he said it's working.

 

Maybe it is like that too with your scope. I don't know what's happening or why it behaves like that. But maybe you can try it.


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#8 Gary Z

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:39 PM

I did have an issue with my Stellarvue Access 80 when I first bought it.  Worked great with my 1.25" but not my 2" diagonal.  Stellarvue shipped me a  shorter 2" compression clamp  which is the piece that the diagonal goes into.  Now, my two inch diagonal works nicely.  

 

Gary


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#9 Mike W.

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 08:26 AM

Good morning, quite the learning curve when you first dive  into this hobby I agree, fortunately we all have more than enough time to sort out our problems and learn as that the universe will still be up there.

 

First let me say I wish I had that scope, it's a very fine instrument. waytogo.gif

 

The scope you have is very finicky about which eyepiece and which diagonal will work, if the eyepieces and diagonal were picked by the vendor/shop and not by the manufacturer then there could be the problem.

 

I'd contact the manufacturer   https://www.saxon.co...telescopes.html

Explain your situation and what you have in lenses/eyepieces & diagonal, a lot of the time the vendor that sells the scope doesn't have a good knowledge of the product.

 

That scope is an advanced scope to start out with so it will take a bit longer to gain knowledge on how it works.

The Moon is a tempting first target and seems easy enough but as a bright blob of light you don't know which way you're out of focus..

 

Try the scope in the daytime on a target a distance away, a house, a tree, a mountain, put in the eyepieces as you did during the night, run the full length of the focus draw tube, turn the knob one way all the way and then the other way all the way, go slowly these short tubes snap into and out of focus very fast and if your just turning the knob quickly you might run right past focus.

If it still doesn't find focus then again, contact the manufacturer.

 

During the daytime you don't have to keep adjusting the scope to keep the target in view and it makes things a bit less of a hassle.

 

Take your time, relax, you have a lot to learn so don't try to learn too fast. smile.gif


Edited by Mike W., 21 August 2019 - 08:31 AM.

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#10 JoeInMN

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 10:23 AM

This may seem like a silly post, but, just to be sure -- When we say that we are focusing in, we mean that the eyepiece is moving closer to the lens; when we say out, we mean it's moving toward your eye. It occurs to me that these terms may be somewhat confusing, because you rack the focuser out to see things that are closer to you, and in to see things farther away. A telescope is far more likely to need help racking outward than inward, which is why extension tubes are so common. I'm not sure how to get more focuser travel inward, short of taking a hacksaw to the tube.


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#11 Mike W.

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 06:37 AM

You can shorten the light path by using a 2" SCT type diagonal that's what I have to do to use 2" eyepieces in my WO Zenithstar 66, but 99% of the time I'm using 1.25" components

You remove the 1.25" eyepiece holding ring on the draw-tube and screw on the SCT diagonal, an only the WO SCT diagonal will actually shorten the path..


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#12 tony_spina

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 05:38 PM

Hi all, frustrated beginner here.
I have a Saxon 1206AZ4 Refractor Telescope and am trying to get a closer view of the moon. Closer and still a bit clear if possible.
I asked for help on another thread and got a lot of advice for which I am thankful but in all honesty it confused me even more. I am beginning to see that using a telescope isn't as simple as I was hoping it to be.
Whilst I can see the moon clearly and in its entirety, using a 2x Barlow and a 25mm Plossl lens, I cannot get it to forward focus enough to see the moon clearly - with and without the diagonal/Barlow or anything I had, so I bought, under suggestion from the shop that I bought my scope from, (online - I live in a small town on an island) an 8mm wide scope and a fine tuning ring.
I have no idea how or where the fine tuner ring is meant to fit. Can anyone help?
I tried the 8mm lens by itself and I still cannot forward focus enough to even make out the moon... it's just a bright blur.
Another thing I'd like to know... when looking at stars thru the scope, as I bought it, using either the 25mm Plossl or the 10mm Plossl and no diagonal or Barlow... I see the stars and just more stars that I obviously can't see with the naked eye... but it's just more stars, no planets as such... is that right? Or should I be able to see the likes of Jupiter... far off but still as a planet and not as a star?
Hope someone can help as I am now thinking I have bought a way to expensive "ornament".

Many thanks.

As others have said,  find a local astronomy club.  They will be more than happy to show you how to use the scope to look at the moon,  planets and stars 

 

Have you tried calling the vendor you purchased the scope from to help you with your problems that you posted on your other thread? 


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#13 MissMac22

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 04:39 PM

You are a person in need of hands on help.  Get to an astronomy club outreach event or star party.  Or at least contact a club and ask about sessions that offer help.  I am in two clubs and both are eager to help beginners and anyone else needing help with the hobby.  
 
https://www.skyandte...-organizations/

 
 

Hi, and welcome. 
 
It seems very unlikely that you are being prevented from reaching focus because you can’t move the eyepiece inward far enough. And by inward, I mean moving the eyepiece closer to the far end of the scope where the big lens (the objective) is mounted. 
 
Rather, it seems more likely that the eyepiece needs to move outward more. 
 
Probably the designers of the scope had in mind that the diagonal would be in place when viewing. So I think you should use the provided diagonal while trying to reach focus. 
 
Also, for now, do not use the Barlow. Let’s try and get things working in the most basic configuration. Once that’s done, we can work on mucking things up with accessories. 
 
Insert the diagonal into the focuser, and then the 25mm eyepiece into the diagonal. Point the scope at the moon. Crank the focuser all the way out, i.e., move the eyepiece outward as far as possible. Then slowly crank the focuser inward until it comes into focus. 
 
If it never comes into focus this way, then there is a problem that can be solved once we know where the prime focus point lies.
 
With the scope still pointed at the moon, remove the eyepiece and diagonal. Crank the focuser all the way inward. Get a piece of paper and let the moon project through the empty focuser on to the paper. Move the paper away from the focuser until the projected image of the moon is in focus. Measure the distance from the paper to the end of the telescope tube (or any other fixed reference) and record it. 
 
The “optical path”, which includes the diagonal and the extended focuser tube, but not the eyepiece, has to be about the same total length as you just measured for an eyepiece to come into focus. Probably the focuser, by itself, is not long enough. Most scopes like yours need either the diagonal or an extension tube to reach focus.

 
 

If by "forward focus" you mean bringing the eyepiece closer to the objective lens, then a fine tuning ring is the exact opposite of what you want.  Fine tuning rings screw on to the filter side of the eyepiece and make the barrel longer so the eyepiece is further away from the objective.  Are you sure it's the toward objective direction that the eyepiece needs to go?  You can pull the eyepiece outward to make sure it's not the away from the objecctive direction.
 
An f/5 120mm refractor is rather demanding of eyepieces. 
 
Diagonals always add length to the optical path for a given amount of fouser tube withdrawn.  How much more depends on the design and size.  Tell us more about that diagonal (with pictures if possible).  Is it a mirror or prism and is it 2" or 1.25"?

 
 

Look, you have a good sized telescope.  This will be great for viewing the moon  (use a lunar filter to minimize the color aberration.  For planets like Jupiter, Not sure what eyepiece.  Can you locate Jupiter or Saturn in the sky?  If so, is your finderscope aligned to your telescope, meaning when you look at an object with your finderscope, the object you see centered in the finderscope should be the same object in your telescope, only bigger.  If you have not aligned your finderscope, please align your finderscope using a pole a fair distance away, first using your 25mm plossl eyepice, then try again with your 10mm eyepiece.  Then try on the moon, or bright star.  Once you do this, you'll be able to put your target object first thru the finderscope and look thru your telescope and focus and observe the target.  Your mount seems to be stable enough.  
 
If you can, as Napp suggested reach out to as local an astronomy club as you can, you'll not only get assistance, but hands on help that will allow you to get the most out of your telescope and mount.  But those eyepieces should reveal the planets of saturn and Jupiter ok, especially the 10mm without the barlow.  Granted, it would be cool to use the barlow.  Are you in Australia?  This is where I found the mount and scope that you have.  
Did you buy this new?  If so, and a club isn't an option for you, then I highly suggest you contact the vendor your purchased the scope or at least the company as it claims to have a 5 year warranty.  Jupiter and Saturn viewing, if you are in Australia should be quite nice as they will be higher in the sky than here in the US.  
 
Gary

 
 

I had a 100mm f/6 Orion refractor that came with a 2" diagonal.  When I tried to use it with a 2" to 1.25" adapter and 1.25" eyepieces, it didn't have enough in-travel to reach focus with some of my eyepieces.  
 
The fix was to ditch the 2" diagonal and use a 1.25" diagonal instead.  This shortened the light path enough to reach focus.

 
 

Few days ago someone had a similar problem, exactly able to focus with eyepiece but not with barlow. The scope he was using is 60mm with 700mm focal length. Both his and your scope should be able to do well with barlow, theoritically.
 
He removed the diagonal and he said it's working.
 
Maybe it is like that too with your scope. I don't know what's happening or why it behaves like that. But maybe you can try it.

 
 

I did have an issue with my Stellarvue Access 80 when I first bought it.  Worked great with my 1.25" but not my 2" diagonal.  Stellarvue shipped me a  shorter 2" compression clamp  which is the piece that the diagonal goes into.  Now, my two inch diagonal works nicely.  
 
Gary

 
 

Good morning, quite the learning curve when you first dive  into this hobby I agree, fortunately we all have more than enough time to sort out our problems and learn as that the universe will still be up there.
 
First let me say I wish I had that scope, it's a very fine instrument. waytogo.gif
 
The scope you have is very finicky about which eyepiece and which diagonal will work, if the eyepieces and diagonal were picked by the vendor/shop and not by the manufacturer then there could be the problem.
 
I'd contact the manufacturer   https://www.saxon.co...telescopes.html
Explain your situation and what you have in lenses/eyepieces & diagonal, a lot of the time the vendor that sells the scope doesn't have a good knowledge of the product.
 
That scope is an advanced scope to start out with so it will take a bit longer to gain knowledge on how it works.
The Moon is a tempting first target and seems easy enough but as a bright blob of light you don't know which way you're out of focus..
 
Try the scope in the daytime on a target a distance away, a house, a tree, a mountain, put in the eyepieces as you did during the night, run the full length of the focus draw tube, turn the knob one way all the way and then the other way all the way, go slowly these short tubes snap into and out of focus very fast and if your just turning the knob quickly you might run right past focus.
If it still doesn't find focus then again, contact the manufacturer.
 
During the daytime you don't have to keep adjusting the scope to keep the target in view and it makes things a bit less of a hassle.
 
Take your time, relax, you have a lot to learn so don't try to learn too fast. smile.gif

 

Thank You everyone for all your wonderful suggestions.I tried to quote to you all but I exceeded the allowed number so forgive me if I don't add you here. I live in Tasmania and rural Tassie at that, so there are no clubs or anything of the like nearby. At best I'd have to phone one so I may as well phone the shop where I am getting my equipment... which I will do.
I have had some success using my star diagonal. I get the moon and yes it is clear, so that's a win for me. I still have no idea how or where to use the fine tuning ring. I cannot see where I fit it to anything, including the eyepiece or with/without the diagonal. Have tried it pretty much on everything I have... no idea where it is meant to fit as it can be slid into the scope without any diagonals but all it does is sit there... it does interact with anything... totally confused with it's purpose so might send back for refund. I have a 1.25", 90 degree diagonal as I have a bad spine and this helps my neck. I do have a blue lens filter that I need to try also... when I figure out where it goes.
So, to cap it all, I have the moon as I wish to see it... finally, YAYYYYY!!!! Now all I need is the clear skies... sky is much like the name of this site - cloudy.
Thank you to absolutely everyone who have helped me... you have no idea how much it is appreciated. Now saving for infrared binoculars... next pain in the neck lol.
Many thanks, fantastic people. x

#14 25585

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 04:44 PM

This may seem like a silly post, but, just to be sure -- When we say that we are focusing in, we mean that the eyepiece is moving closer to the lens; when we say out, we mean it's moving toward your eye. It occurs to me that these terms may be somewhat confusing, because you rack the focuser out to see things that are closer to you, and in to see things farther away. A telescope is far more likely to need help racking outward than inward, which is why extension tubes are so common. I'm not sure how to get more focuser travel inward, short of taking a hacksaw to the tube.

I get confused on this for bino, but that's another thread.... 


Edited by 25585, 23 August 2019 - 04:44 PM.


#15 Cajundaddy

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 05:10 PM

Progress, yay! 

 

As other's have suggested, it is a very good idea to get to know your scope during the daytime on a few distant objects.  This way you can easily see how everything works and can get used to pointing, focusing, aligning your finder scope, and adjusting to different eyepiece views.  Once you are familiar, you can relax and use it at night without worry.  If you are in the southern hemisphere Jupiter and Saturn should be well placed for viewing.  Check the local star chart or download a starfinder app like SkySafari to your phone and it will show you where to find them.

 

This may help:

https://www.timeandd...ustralia/sydney



#16 GoFish

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 05:15 PM

I can’t be sure this is what you have, but some folks offer a “helical focuser” that can be used for fine tuning.  My view is that you should not spend any time trying to work with the fine focuser or any filters until you’ve gotten several evenings’ observing under your belt just using the 90 deg diagonal and eyepieces.

 

The 25mm eyepiece will give you low magnification (24X) and bright wide angle views. Try this on some open clusters and nebulae. 

 

The 10mm eyepiece is 60X, medium power, and narrower field of view. Good for galaxies and globular clusters. 

 

The 8mm will give 75X and still narrower field.  Probably best used on Jupiter and Saturn right now. 


Edited by GoFish, 23 August 2019 - 05:16 PM.


#17 Bowlerhat

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:47 PM

There are so much more other than the moon and planets. 

 

I suggest you watch this youtube channel: astronomy & nature TV. He got videos of really basic set up and tons of other informative telescope videos.

 

For start, you can watch an example on how to set up a scope

 

Not sure if you had sorted everything out based on your writing, but keep asking around in here too.


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#18 Mike W.

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:03 PM

I'll second Astronomy & Nature, watch all the episodes,,

 

The blue filter on Jupiter will be a nice beginning, it turn's Jupiter blue but the bands are easier to distinquish and it cuts the glare, Jupiter is bright, there's detail to be found when reducing light on bright targets,

 

For Saturn try a #8 Yellow/green, will help the rings and bands of the planet kind of stick out better

 

For the Moon more than half full, with  your scope I'd stack an ND 25 filter on top of a polarize filter.

 

the filters will either screw into the bottom of the eyepiece, or they can be screwed into the nose barrel of the diagonal.

 

You have sooooo many more great star cluster's in the southern skies, no filters needed for those just a low power wide fov eyepiece.

 

wow,,,,



#19 tony_spina

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:18 PM

If you can post a picture of the fine focus ring. It would help folks here to see what you have so we can tell you how to use it, or if it's even  necessary (most likely not) 

 

You can get a 6mm 66 degree expanse clone for your scope to give you 100x. They sell them on ebay about $21 USD shipped from china.  They are black with a gold ring

 

https://www.ebay.com...redirect=mobile



#20 Mike W.

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:43 AM

Morning, your scope has a focal length of 600mm, the eyepiece you're using has a focal length of 25mm,

 

to figure the magnification level you're using with your scope and eyepiece combined you divide the scopes focal length by the eyepiece focal length    600 / 25 = 24X

 

With an aperture of 120mm you should be able to get to about 200X without much trouble, figuring roughly 40X per inch of aperture.

Yeah, weird stuff starts to happen to the photo's if they're squeezed so working within the scopes design capabilities will make life easier.

So to get up to 200X or there about's, eyepieces of 3mm is about max, the 8mm the store sent you, is it a plossl too?

 

Now comes another step forward in the learning to drive your scope path, exit pupil, that's the focal plane of the eye piece delivered to your eye., kind of layman terms but I think you get the idea,

The larger the exit pupil the larger the screen is for your eye to view. 

Depending on your eye's capabilities the largest exit pupil you want is around 6mm, but that will be a very low magnification and we're trying to walk on the Moon with your scope and the high magnification we need for that won't let us get much more than maybe 0.7mm at best, best would be a Televue Ethos SX 3.7mm 100° eyepiece.

A Televue Nagler is an 82° fov eyepiece and very well corrected/designed for faster scopes like yours.3.5mm would be just under 200X in your scope, and the 2.5mm might be a bit much, at 240X.

 

I'm bringing up the Nagler vs. Ethos eyepieces because until you're very dedicated to this hobby the cost of an Ethos vs the cost of a Nagler is substantial.

 

To calculate exit pupil is to divide the eyepiece focal length in millimeters by the telescope's focal ratio (f/stop). .

 

As you can see, there's some math on this path too, but all the formula's are on the net, nothing secret about it, just google "How to calculate,,,, whatever"

 

When I'm thinking of purchase or just research I'll use an online calculator to figure Total Field of View of an eyepiece in my scope on this site, http://www.csgnetwork.com/telefov.html

Just fill in the scopes focal length and the eyepiece focal length and field of view, click enter and your results will pop right up.

 

But, don't go buying anything on my recommendation's alone, I'm just trying to example up some of the learning curve.


Edited by Mike W., 24 August 2019 - 07:50 AM.


#21 Mike W.

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 09:23 AM

Morning again MM, ok, found your other thread, they covered what I did in the last post and you've been working with your scope for about a month, it takes time with this scope, it's also new on the market so there's not a lot of background to work with, but one thing I did pick up on, plossl eyepiece's and you wear glasses,

 

I now understand that the entire set up came as the manufacture's offered kit, all they did was add a 90° diagonal.

And that diagonal I would suggest replacing but not yet, let's do some more research.

 

I know you don't wear glasses when your using the scope and the low mag views do focus but your high mag views don't, it's simple, it's eye relief of the eye piece and where your eyes come to focus, the plossl has almost no eye-relief so your eyeball is almost touching the eyepiece to see the focused view.

 

The Nagler's have a lot more eye-relief so your eye will find focus with those.

 

The diagonal is also a big part of this equation, on inspecting the pic's you posted in your last thread, the adapter appears to be quite tall, could you post a closer pic of the focuser with your set up with the 90° diagonal installed instead of the 45° diagonal?

 

Unfortunately with high end scopes it takes high end glass to work to your expectations.

 

There's plenty of time, try not to hurry, the Barlow and eyepiece's you have won't work in that scope, they will need too much in-travel of the focuser.

 

Big hint on purchasing stuff for this scope, don't try to short cut, it will only cost more in the end.

 

There are some people I can call later today that may be familiar with your scope, maybe I can get some answers from them that will help me help you.


Edited by Mike W., 24 August 2019 - 09:24 AM.


#22 tony_spina

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 09:40 AM

Mike

From the original thread and link to the scope this is another rebranding of the Orion ST120 (D:120mm FL:600mm). What we have not seen is the 90 degree star diagonal 



#23 Chris Y

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 11:36 AM

There are so much more other than the moon and planets. 

 

I suggest you watch this youtube channel: astronomy & nature TV. He got videos of really basic set up and tons of other informative telescope videos.

 

For start, you can watch an example on how to set up a scope

 

Not sure if you had sorted everything out based on your writing, but keep asking around in here too.

I second the recommendation for Astronomy & Nature TV on youtube.  Their videos were my "go-to" for information when I was first getting started about a year ago.



#24 sg6

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 11:52 AM

What if anything besides scope, diagonal and eyepiece came with the scope?

Recall about 5 or 6 years back I was asked to try sort out a young lads scope, likely a 60mm. Parents had assumes that all the supplied items had to go on somewhere and had managed to fit just about everything. Result was nothing worked grin.gif  my first 10 minutes was pulling everything off and rebuilding it. Then we looked at the moon, nice, clear, sharp.

 

The opposite was a 102 I bought. It came with 2 extension tubes, I had no idea if it needed 1 or 2 added. I added 1 and it seems happy.

 

I wonder if yours is like my 102 and there is an extension tube that needs to be fitted -  so was one in the general box of bits.

 

A 2" diagonal add to the overall path and pushes the eyepiece out so they may be insufficent inward travel. I have (had) this on a 72ED. It just reached focus, a machine shop turned 2.5mm off to sit it a little lower. Still tight however.

 

It is always a problem asking and describing what to do. It depends a lot on how the 2 parties think.

 

Stars: Yep, all you see if more, the easy ones are brighter but never bigger, just more of them. Planets - presently 2 of them, easy to see by eye, they are the bright things - not sure which direction for you. Well Jupiter is, Saturn is somewhat dimmer and to the eye several stars are brighter.

 

If still problems and confusion take a photo of the rear end set up of the scope. Something may well be apparent. Usually take that bit out, or get one of these.

 

Tasmainian skies should be dark.

Other advice is just get out and play a bit with the equipment. Then come back and ask more. Half is expectation, Still suggest leaving the barlow out of the scene for now. They can just add problems.



#25 Mike W.

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:16 PM

It's in the OP's first thread, looks to be a generic inexpensive prism, like an unmarked Celestron

 

Mike

From the original thread and link to the scope this is another rebranding of the Orion ST120 (D:120mm FL:600mm). What we have not seen is the 90 degree star diagonal 

 

.https://www.cloudyni...p/#entry9555478


Edited by Mike W., 24 August 2019 - 07:17 PM.



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