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Current Celestron CPCs

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#1 mattalan

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:51 PM

Good evening! 

 

Getting close to jumping on the SCT train with a Celestron CPC (either 1100 or 925 HD). Been browsing the archives and have noticed there are a lot of positive reviews and people generally happy with these scopes. I have, however, read more than a few posts with problems with the electronics, mostly drives, motors, alignment, GPS and such. A lot of these are older posts so I was wondering if anyone can comment on the current production scopes or if these bugs have been worked out by Celestron? If I am going to spend over 3 grand for a scope, proper function out of the box and longevity seem like appropriate expectations right?

 

As always, thanks in advance for all the great advice! 


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#2 junomike

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 06:43 AM

Anything can happen but usually these are solid set ups. The HD has apparently better internals (gears).

Best thing you can do is buy from a reputable seller/vendor.



#3 Neptune

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 07:56 AM

I bought mine used, not sure of the age, but it is an older one. In a nut shell, I love my 11 Edge.  It is a decent do all scope. I have noticed that my GPS is fairly temperamental. Sometimes it works other times it doesn't (check your hand controller to make sure it is ON). When it doesn't you have to manually input the date & time. Not a big deal but, it is nice when it works.

 

I sometimes wonder if I should have purchased the 9.25. The problem is, both scopes share the same mount so they weight within about 5 pounds of each other. The 11 is fairly heavy, but it does deliver a slightly brighter image given the same magnification when compared to the smaller diameter scopes, namely the 8 and 9.25.

 

The SCT by it's nature is not spectacular at any one thing besides being compact and easy to transport and set up. With that said, that doesn't mean you won't thoroughly enjoy the 9.25 or the 11.  You just won't get really wide fields of view or incredibly sharp details that a hi-end refractor will deliver. As for the reliability, it's a crap shoot. Electronics can go out at any point, as said above, if your nervous, buy from a Celestron Dealer.



#4 carolinaskies

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 01:07 PM

I have multiple forked SCTs.  From small 60 & 90mm all the way to a 16" LX200 GPS.  None newer than 2007. 

Among them is a 2004 CPC1100. 

Today's CPC model is cosmetically unchanged from my earlier model. Internals, OTA, etc are all the same.  The only difference is actually the newer handcontroller has a mini-USB port on the bottom making the necessity of finding a computer RS232 cable obsolete (I upgraded mine btw). The GPS rollover struck many mounts across multiple manufacturers because fork mounts last like the energizer bunny and keep going.  The GPS rollover seems to effect models older than 2015, CPC included so that should not be an issue you'll need to deal with on a new model. 

While some people think the SCT is somehow a step below a newtonian or refractor, the reality is this is not the experience of 99% of SCT owners who are extremely satisfied with their SCT performance (whether on a fork or GEM).  

I bought my first SCT in 1997 and can honestly say though the buy-in price is high the performance has never left me wanting.  We can always dream of more aperture, but we can also always dream of having dark skies! :)    The fork'd SCT provides ease of setup and use and I believe you will be very happy. 


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#5 junomike

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:43 AM

I have multiple forked SCTs.  From small 60 & 90mm all the way to a 16" LX200 GPS.  None newer than 2007. 

Among them is a 2004 CPC1100. 

Today's CPC model is cosmetically unchanged from my earlier model. Internals, OTA, etc are all the same.  The only difference is actually the newer handcontroller has a mini-USB port on the bottom making the necessity of finding a computer RS232 cable obsolete (I upgraded mine btw). The GPS rollover struck many mounts across multiple manufacturers because fork mounts last like the energizer bunny and keep going.  The GPS rollover seems to effect models older than 2015, CPC included so that should not be an issue you'll need to deal with on a new model. 

While some people think the SCT is somehow a step below a newtonian or refractor, the reality is this is not the experience of 99% of SCT owners who are extremely satisfied with their SCT performance (whether on a fork or GEM).  

I bought my first SCT in 1997 and can honestly say though the buy-in price is high the performance has never left me wanting.  We can always dream of more aperture, but we can also always dream of having dark skies! smile.gif    The fork'd SCT provides ease of setup and use and I believe you will be very happy. 

This is correct for the standard CPC's but the OP is considering the 925 HD which is the Deluxe model using better internals (or so I thought).



#6 carolinaskies

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 02:47 PM

This is correct for the standard CPC's but the OP is considering the 925 HD which is the Deluxe model using better internals (or so I thought).

The HD difference is the OTA ONLY.  The mount drive system is identical. 



#7 junomike

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:31 AM

The HD difference is the OTA ONLY.  The mount drive system is identical. 

Celestron lists the CPC1100 without the features as the CPC1100 Deluxe. See under "Built for Imaging"

 

"Most altazimuth telescopes are designed primarily for visual use, but not the CPC Deluxe HD. It offers all the same high-end features you’ll find on our German equatorial mounts. Out of the box, your CPC Deluxe can track accurately for up to 30 seconds without adding a wedge, thanks to a re-engineered drive train with a 6-inch brass gear, stainless steel worm gear, and both steel and nylon ball bearings."


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