Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Beginner's Observation Journal

binoculars observing observing report dso
  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#26 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 27 August 2019 - 03:54 PM

27th August 2019

20:30h  30°C low humidity

Southern Balcony, SkyWatcher 254mm dobson, Leupold 8x42

 

 

So, after a week of cloudy nights and rain, finally, let's say, clear sky.

 

It was well after dusk when I brought out my Dobsonian.

It took some 10 minutes to collimate telescope in the dark with a laser collimator.

 

The sky is clear but seeing is very poor.

Naked eye, I can see just parts of southern sky asterisms.

 

So, a quick look to Saturn with Plossl 25mm at 48x, then with 10mm Plossl at 120x. OK, nice view. Saturn is very small but

somehow crisp seeing. My 6 yo son came to see Saturn, he is glad to see his old buddy. He wants to see Titan. Hmmm.

 

I tried to look at Jupiter but was already behind my neighbor's cherry tree.

I grab a Leupold, quick scan of the sky. I'm refreshing what I have learned last time.

I need to check again some asterisms on the phone app.

 

OK, Ophiuchus - check! Aquila - check ! Sagitta - check ! Coathanger check ! Trying to recognize some new stars and shapes

under the Serpens Caput, checking the phone again, they are parts of Scorpius and Libra.

Can't see Lyra, it is high in the sky, my roof is blocking the view.

Can't see Deneb too but if I lean over a fence a bit I can see whole Cygnus.

 

My night vision adaptation is ruined every now and then by my neighbour's awkward front house light.

Ok, so there is Albireo. I can barely see it naked eye.

 

I grab my Leupold again, but it's hard to ID Albireo through binoculars.

Can't see rest of Cygnus and Lyra at all so that is making me lost all the time.

 

Leaning over the fence again naked eye, ok, there's Deneb, that's Sadr so that is Albireo.

OK, again with binoculars, I'm not sure again.

 

My younger, 3 yo kid is coming to find his older brother with turned on mobile phone full brightness white screen.

My vision is ruined again.

 

Can't see Albireo at all now.

After 5 minutes both kids are inside the house.

 

I'm trying to point Dobsonian at the Albireo.

So, I found markers, some 3 degrees from the edge of my roof and near the power cable.

 

OK, now through the finderscope, I'm not sure where am I, looking around for the brightest star, I think I found it finally.

Looking through the 25mm Plossl at 48x, yes, that's Albireo, very nice. First seeing of double star.

 

Switching to 10mm Plossl and 120x, trying not to shake Dobson, the focus is out, but the double star is there.

A hint of blue and yellow.

 

Switching to the Lacerta 82° 7 mm with 171x, beside the wider FOV, I see no noticeable difference.

If my calculations are correct, aFOV with Lacerta is 0.48° and with 10mm Plossl is 52/120= 0.43°

 

I'm glad I saw Albireo double star for the first time.

 

Then I took a quick look to the East naked eye, I can see parts of Andromeda and Pegasus.

To be more precise I can see Mirach, Alpheratz, Sheat and Markab.

Rest is not visible naked eye. There is nasty haze and glow there.

 

Wanted to look at M31 through Dobson but I'll have to wait for it.

 

So that's it for tonight. Spent outside almost 2 hours.

I didn't saw much but after a week this is nice. 

 

Clear Skies !


  • csa/montana and IMB like this

#27 csa/montana

csa/montana

    Den Mama & Gold Star Award Winner

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 101675
  • Joined: 14 May 2005
  • Loc: montana

Posted 27 August 2019 - 09:23 PM

Your reports are very interesting, and very well written!  Thank you!


  • Hellingen likes this

#28 IMB

IMB

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 632
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2016

Posted 27 August 2019 - 09:43 PM

27th August 2019

20:30h  30°C low humidity

Southern Balcony, SkyWatcher 254mm dobson, Leupold 8x42

 

<...>


OK, Ophiuchus - check! Aquila - check ! Sagitta - check ! Coathanger check ! Trying to recognize some new stars and shapes

under the Serpens Caput, checking the phone again, they are parts of Scorpius and Libra.

 

<...>

If you follow Aquila's tail (stars Lambda Aql, 12 Aql, Eta Sct - all visible to the naked eye under half-decent skies), you'll find a very nice open cluster M11 (aka Wild Duck Cluster). Looks like a round fuzzy disk in binoculars, resolves beautifully with a telescope - it's very star-rich.

 

Do you have a star atlas? If you don't, I recommend Deep Sky Reiseatlas. Very convenient in the field: printed on laminated paper and spiral-bound. In addition to star charts, it provides lists of objects with their descriptions. A number of listed objects are visible in binoculars or a small telescope.


Edited by IMB, 27 August 2019 - 09:52 PM.

  • Hellingen likes this

#29 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 28 August 2019 - 04:12 AM

Your reports are very interesting, and very well written!  Thank you!

I'm very honoured to hear that. Thank you for your support but my English language knowledge is lacking. 


  • csa/montana likes this

#30 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 28 August 2019 - 04:20 AM

If you follow Aquila's tail (stars Lambda Aql, 12 Aql, Eta Sct - all visible to the naked eye under half-decent skies), you'll find a very nice open cluster M11 (aka Wild Duck Cluster). Looks like a round fuzzy disk in binoculars, resolves beautifully with a telescope - it's very star-rich.

 

Do you have a star atlas? If you don't, I recommend Deep Sky Reiseatlas. Very convenient in the field: printed on laminated paper and spiral-bound. In addition to star charts, it provides lists of objects with their descriptions. A number of listed objects are visible in binoculars or a small telescope.

 

I'll try to find M11 tonight if the night sky is clear. 

I have some PC and phone app so far ( Sky Safari, Star Walk 2, Stellarium on PC) .

I also have some online Sky charts.

Ordered some great books from Ebay but still waiting them to arrive. 

I'll check that german travel atlas too. 

 

Thank you !


Edited by Hellingen, 28 August 2019 - 04:21 AM.

  • IMB likes this

#31 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 28 August 2019 - 04:36 AM

If you follow Aquila's tail (stars Lambda Aql, 12 Aql, Eta Sct - all visible to the naked eye under half-decent skies), you'll find a very nice open cluster M11 (aka Wild Duck Cluster). Looks like a round fuzzy disk in binoculars, resolves beautifully with a telescope - it's very star-rich.

 

I just checked some online star charts and I found that I've been scanning that area many times with my binoculars when going from Aquila to Ophiuchus and to Serpens Caput. I remember that the Scutum was full of bright stars, also in the area around λAql and 12 Aql. You've just made may goal for tonight. cool.gif Thanks !


  • csa/montana likes this

#32 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 28 August 2019 - 08:11 AM

I'd also like to invite all the beginners to join me and share your struggles. 

I hope I'm not the last one grin.gif

 

I know that here on forum we have another better and older similar topic with similar name but it evolved 

to everything but newbie years ago. I'm late unfortunately. 

 

So, if there are any beginners trying to dig deeper, let me hear your story. 

We will learn that way faster. 

 

 

Clear Skies !



#33 IMB

IMB

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 632
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2016

Posted 28 August 2019 - 08:42 AM

I just checked some online star charts and I found that I've been scanning that area many times with my binoculars when going from Aquila to Ophiuchus and to Serpens Caput. I remember that the Scutum was full of bright stars, also in the area around λAql and 12 Aql. You've just made may goal for tonight. cool.gif Thanks !

You've observed the Scutum Star Cloud, one of the brightest areas of the Milky Way. If you follow the Milky Way further south in the direction of Alnasi (Gamma Sqr), you'll be cruising along the Steam from the Teapot, the area of the Milky Way that hosts many showpiece objects and is an absolute delight to observe with binoculars: the Eagle Nebula M16 (requires dark skies), the Swan Nebula M17, the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud M24, the Lagoon Nebula M8. Under dark skies, these objects can be seen with the naked eye.


Edited by IMB, 28 August 2019 - 08:51 AM.

  • Hellingen likes this

#34 csa/montana

csa/montana

    Den Mama & Gold Star Award Winner

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 101675
  • Joined: 14 May 2005
  • Loc: montana

Posted 28 August 2019 - 09:04 AM

I'd also like to invite all the beginners to join me and share your struggles. 

I hope I'm not the last one grin.gif

 

I know that here on forum we have another better and older similar topic with similar name but it evolved 

to everything but newbie years ago. I'm late unfortunately. 

 

So, if there are any beginners trying to dig deeper, let me hear your story. 

We will learn that way faster. 

 

 

Clear Skies !

There's always room for another thread; and reading your posts brings me back to my beginner days!  We forget how being a true beginner looking at the night skies was; confusing, challenging, but so rewarding.  Your posts bring back those wonderful days of being a real beginner, searching the night skies.

 

So thank you, for taking us along on your wonderful journey under the night skies!


  • NYJohn S, IMB and Hellingen like this

#35 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 28 August 2019 - 04:49 PM

28th August 2019

21:00 - 22:00h

28° C

Olympus 10x50, SkyWatcher 250mm f/4.7 Dobson

 

As suggested today by forum member IMB, my goal for tonight is Messier 11 aka The Wild Duck cluster, in Scutum.

Scutum is the fifth smallest constellation out there.

 

I was scanning this particular area with binoculars few times but never noticed M11 even it is pretty bright.

 

The seeing tonight is again bad.

I noticed that I couldn't see any star some 15 ° above the horizon at all, naked eye, maybe even more. Almost up to the Saturn.

Purple haze but not by Jimmy Hendrix.

 

I found M11 pretty quick with binos. I'm wondering how come I never saw it before.

 

Switched to Dobson, S.Plossl 25mm, 52° FOV, 48x magnification and 1.08° aFOV, Wild Duck cluster is small in EP view.

I'm not sure but I'd say it took some 1/10th part of EP view.

But it was very interesting to see. So many stars there. Noticed one very bright star near the middle od cluster.

 

Switched to S.Plossl 10mm, 120x, 0.43° aFOV. Much better now, M11 took bigger part of EP view now.

Probably due to poor seeing it was not like on the pictures, fewer stars and slightly different shape of the cluster.

But magical to see, nevertheless.

 

I also did a sloppy collimating job, it was dark and I was in a hurry to see M11 ( or just lazy). Maybe that's the reason too.

I'll try again some other time, that's for sure.

 

Found Albireo pretty quick. I was impressed by that, seems I'm learning after all.

Also noticed, that the major reason why I'm sloppy with finder scope is reversed/rotated view.

I'm thinking that I'd be better with the corrected finderscope view, like on binoculars.

I would recognize asterisms much much faster.  Can't wait until ordered Telrad arrives.

 

Pegasus is on the East. I can see part of Andromeda asterism.

Grab my Olympus 10x50 and found M31 in no time. Pretty dim.

 

I picked up Dobson and I carried him to the eastern side of the balcony.

It's heavy.

 

The balcony is not big and I have a very small gap to point the telescope to the northeast- east.

Somehow I managed to do it.

But, nasty street light from the northern side of the house is ruining everything and also

my neighbour's porch light is shining on my face from some 15 meters at this Dobson position.

 

M31 look even worse than the last time I saw it through 8x42 binoculars.

Just a tiny, dim, grey smudge. Couldn't even focus on it nicely. Maybe carrying dobson ruined collimation even worse.

 

At this position, with top of Dobson almost over the fence, no collimation possible.

I tried with 10 mm super Plossl and 7mm Lacerta 82 UWA but no difference.

 

Really bad conditions. That's it for tonight.

 

I really need to find soon some dark site.


  • NYJohn S likes this

#36 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 30 August 2019 - 03:41 PM

30th August 2019

21:00 - 21:30h

25° C

Leupold 8x42

 

 

Today I finally got a focal adaptor for my Nikon but I decided not to try it tonight.

Tomorrow night I should have much more time, so I can set everything up early, properly collimate telescope and connect DSLR to it.

So, for tonight, just quick binoculars sweep from the balcony on the west.

 

From this spot, I can see Southwest - West - Northwest and around 50° toward the Zenith. Even more, if I lean a bit over the fence.

 

Jupiter and Antares on the Southwest, Arcturus in the West and Ursa Minor toward the North.

I'm checking all the stars from Bootes with Star Walk 2 on my phone.

From the Nekkar, the top star in Bootes asterism, toward the Zenith there is a nice double star called ν2 Bootes.

I can nicely see it in my Leupold.  Just left ( South ) from Bootes is Corona Borealis with a very bright star, Gemma.

 

After that, I went up, checked my phone, that's Hercules. Ok, with big help from Star Walk I checked all the stars in the asterism.

 

The Big Dipper is next. Consulting phone every now and then.

I'm starting from the handle of the dipper: Benetnash, Mizar and then I saw for the first time that a Mizar is actually a double star. I was very surprised by how separated they are and I never saw that by the naked eye.

Very nice view in 8x42. I found later that the second star is called Alcor.

 

I'm trying to go lower on the horizon from that but a very nasty glare appeared in my binoculars from the street light northern from my house.

 

With just a little bit of leaning over fence a saw Vega.

Took a look through 8x42 and I spotted ε2 Lyra, nicely separated. I believe that's the first time to see them separated.

That's my third double star for tonight.

 

Ok, that's for tonight.

 

I'll try tomorrow night to take some pictures of Saturn and Jupiter.

Hope the night will be clear.

 

 

Until tomorrow,

 

Clear Skies guys !


  • csa/montana, NYJohn S and IMB like this

#37 sg6

sg6

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5697
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Norfolk, UK.

Posted 30 August 2019 - 04:25 PM

Last time I was pointing the scope at objects to view them I found it easiest to use 2 sticky up bits on the tube rings. They probably have a name, just no idea what.

 

Found I could easily sight along the OTA, line up eye and the 2 bits, like an old air rifle sight, and line up on the object. Simple, basic and worked every time.

 

Makes me wonder if a simple adjustable hollow tube on the OTA would be easier, no optics just a tube - may try soon.


  • Hellingen likes this

#38 IMB

IMB

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 632
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2016

Posted 30 August 2019 - 04:40 PM

<...> With just a little bit of leaning over fence a saw Vega.

Took a look through 8x42 and I spotted ε2 Lyra, nicely separated. I believe that's the first time to see them separated.

That's my third double star for tonight. <...>

That's the famous Double Double. Each "star" is in fact a pair with the angular separation of 2.3" and 2.4". I can resolve each pair with my 72 mm refractor at 90x.



#39 IMB

IMB

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 632
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2016

Posted 30 August 2019 - 04:44 PM

<...> Makes me wonder if a simple adjustable hollow tube on the OTA would be easier, no optics just a tube - may try soon.

Ancient greeks called this device "dioptra". You can consult with James Evans, The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy on its astronomical use in the Antiquity.

 

Have you tried a red dot finder or a telrad?


  • Hellingen likes this

#40 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 31 August 2019 - 01:39 AM

 

Found I could easily sight along the OTA, line up eye and the 2 bits, like an old air rifle sight, and line up on the object. Simple, basic and worked every time.

 

Makes me wonder if a simple adjustable hollow tube on the OTA would be easier, no optics just a tube - may try soon.

This is really interesting. For beginner like me, that would be easiest way to aim. grin.gif

Still waiting for my Telrad though, might be similar experience to that.



#41 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 31 August 2019 - 01:44 AM

Ancient greeks called this device "dioptra". You can consult with James Evans, The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy on its astronomical use in the Antiquity.

 

Have you tried a red dot finder or a telrad?

There is always to learn something from you.  How many books did you read anyway? cool.gif



#42 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10352
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 31 August 2019 - 08:24 AM

...Found I could easily sight along the OTA, line up eye and the 2 bits, like an old air rifle sight, and line up on the object. Simple, basic and worked every time...

My Gallileoscope  has a "rifle sight" on it--works ok.  I like my telrad, though (but it only fits on certain size scopes).



#43 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 02 September 2019 - 02:16 AM

My ''Until tomorrow'' from last observation turned into " When are the clouds gonna go away ?! ".

Obviously the Sky is laughing at me now. 

 

crazy.gif

 

Last night I could only see Saturn and Jupiter briefly. 



#44 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 02 September 2019 - 02:25 PM

Today finally arrived Turn left at Orion so I'll at least read about stars when I can't watch them. 


  • csa/montana, Napp and NYJohn S like this

#45 csa/montana

csa/montana

    Den Mama & Gold Star Award Winner

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 101675
  • Joined: 14 May 2005
  • Loc: montana

Posted 03 September 2019 - 04:46 PM

That's always been one of my very favorite Astro books! waytogo.gif 


  • Hellingen likes this

#46 Hellingen

Hellingen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 60
  • Joined: 02 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Europe

Posted 05 September 2019 - 04:28 AM

4th September

22:30h - 00:00  24° C

West Balcony 

Dobson 250 f4.7, ES 14mm 100°, 5.5mm 100° and 2" 28mm Apex (which I got with 120mmED)

 

 

After several rainy days and cloudy nights, last night was first partially clear night.

I've checked a few times early night but there were no stars.

 

Just before bedtime, I peeked through the window again and I saw some stars.

Went out to the western balcony and could see partially clear sky toward the Zenith.

Cygnus was visible very clear.Just part of Aquila.  Lyra very clear.

I grabbed my binos, quick sweep across the sky and then I decided to bring out the Dobson.

 

I just got my Telrad delivered but didn't have time to mount it. I saw some sticky tape on the bottom of the mount so I have yet to see can that be mounted without glueing, the way finderscope is mounted. Didn't have time to check it. 

 

I briefly consulted Turn Left at Orion and I pointed Dobson at Lyra.

In my finderscope, I found Sulafat and Sheliak, then I aimed in the middle.

I had Apex 28mm as my EP at the moment. When I look through it I wasn't sure do I see what I'm looking for.

Consulted book again and noticed that it is suggested to use higher power than usual.

I switched to ES 14mm 100° and then I saw M57 The Ring Nebula for the first time, at the edge of EP. I centered it, tried to focus a bit better, but I wish I have dual-speed focuser on my Dobson. The focuser just isn't that precise. Even small, tiny movements sometimes go over focus.

 

But, The Ring Nebula, again, not as I imagined it would be, but still, I was elated to see it.

Averted vision worked better, that way I could distinguish outer ring from its core.

I switched to 5.5°mm EP, the sky was very, very dim. Couldn't again focus perfectly. With the direct observation I had trouble seeing it. Averted vision was bit better. But, I have to mention that I didn't even collimate telescope that night, I've just centered red laser beam in EP Collimator hole (that is adjusting primary mirror, if I'm not mistaking).

I went back to 14mm soon, took some time observing, my 6 yo kid came to see famous Ring Nebula.

He was delighted to see it too.

 

I also took a quick look at Albireo double star in Cygnus then Epsilon Lyrae, double star in Lyra.

Found again M11 Wild Duck Cluster, this time it was much better seeing than last time, several nights ago.

 

I also noticed that adjusting positions, with Dobson pointed almost upright, around Zenith, is very difficult, jerky. I couldn't make smooth movements.

Also, I was wondered why you guys keep calling that Coathanger as Coathanger when it looks like Civil War gun on wheels, but after I saw it through the reflector, with reversed image, I got the idea. ( I noticed this actually few nights before, but forgot to bring it out). grin.gif

 

It was already past midnight and I have to wake up early.

I wished to see more but had to call it a night.

 

Until next time, Clear Skies !


  • Special Ed, NYJohn S and IMB like this

#47 IMB

IMB

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 632
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2016

Posted 05 September 2019 - 10:53 AM

A UHC filter enhances appearance of the Ring Nebula (I use DGM NPB). With a filter, it becomes more prominent against the background.

 

M27 in Vulpecula is large and bright, a very nice and easy target with any instrument. Further south, there's a loose globular cluster M71 in Sagitta.

 

There are two planetary nebulae in Cygnus visible with small instruments.

 

- NGC 6826 (Blinking Planetary). Needs dark skies. Its surface brightness is too low to allow detection with direct vision, but is sufficiently high to trigger indirect vision. When an observer looks straight into it, it's invisible, but if the direction of a gaze is shifted to the periphery, it suddenly appears. So by shifting the gaze, an observer can make it appear or disappear - to blink, hence its name.

 

- NGC 7027 (Magic Carpet or Pink Pillow Nebula). A remarkable fact about this PN is its very young age, about 600 years. Being so young, it's very small, but very bright. Look for a "fat" bright star under medium power.

 

Not far from NGC 7027 is a double star 61 Cygni. It has a distinction of being the first star with a distance estimate obtained by measuring its parallax. Astronomers struggled for centuries trying to measure stellar parallaxes. Friedrich Bessel succeeded with 61 Cyg in 1838.


Edited by IMB, 05 September 2019 - 11:10 AM.

  • Hellingen likes this

#48 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10352
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 05 September 2019 - 12:45 PM

Enjoyed your report.  smile.gif   You can put your telrad on the scope tube with electrician's or painter's tape to try it in different positions until you attach it permanently.  The double sided tape that comes with it is *very* strong.

 

Pointing a dob at the zenith is difficult--it's called the "Dobson hole", iirc.  I'm sure some dob drivers here will give you some tips.


  • Hellingen likes this

#49 aeajr

aeajr

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12519
  • Joined: 26 Jun 2015
  • Loc: Long Island, New York, USA

Posted 14 September 2019 - 05:32 PM

Hi,

 

I'm starting this topic as a beginner who is trying to learn the night sky and to write down my observations as I progress hopefully.

 

I also hope that more experienced members (if they are reading this)  will jump to help me with my dilemmas and doubts, to give some insights and advices.

 

I'm also hoping that other beginners will join to share their observation and findings.

 

snip...

 

CS !

Welcome to Cloudy Nights.  Starting this observing journal is an excellent idea.  I did the same thing when I first started in July 2015 and it was a HUGE help in my development and learning.

 

A community of observers developed around the discussion.  Many of them have become friends.  Some of them live in my area, we met through cloudy nights and that observing log.   I hope this one serves you as well.

 

I work a lot with newbies so I am going to offer some resources that I think will be helpful.

 

 

New Astronomer Quick Start Guide -

This is based on using binoculars, but I believe it has some great content to help  you on your way and it can certainly be used with a telescope. 
https://www.cloudyni...art-guide-r3143

 

 

You mentioned having problems finding targets.  Here is a method that works extremely well in dark locations and in light polluted areas. 

 

Using an angle gauge to help find targets
https://www.cloudyni...y/#entry8120838

 

 

I may have missed it, but I don't recall seeing you mention an adjustable observing chair. This is the one that I built.  I think it is essential when using a Dobsonian style telescope.

 

Observation Chair- Denver Chair – Works Great!
I built this one .  It took about 2 hours.  Can be built from scrap but if
you went all new, about $30.
http://valleystargazers.com/Chair.pdf

 

 

I like the signature you created.  It will help us help you.    

 

You seem to have a lot of very nice equipment for a newbie.  How long have you been collecting astronomy equipment?

 

Glad to help in any way I can. 


  • BFaucett and Hellingen like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: binoculars, observing, observing report, dso



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics