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Ektachrome 100 new formula under the stars

astrophotography
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#26 bwayne

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 03:41 AM

 

Exposure: 20 minutes

Lens: Stellarvue SV70 ED (420mm at f6) 

Reducer/Flattener: William Optics .8

Filter: IDAS LPS-D1

Pentax LX

So I’ve procured the IDAS filter - now I’m afraid to clean it :) Any precautions on how and what to use ? 

—Brett



#27 Marty0750

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 06:09 AM

So we can now do in 40 minutes with Ektachrome what we can do in 2 minutes with a DSLR?  I'm not sure film has overtaken DSLRs... 

 

I do plan to make quantitative tests.  But it's important to note that the reason we spend an hour taking multiple exposures to stack, with a DSLR, is that we *can*.  If we want results similar to film, we can get them with single exposures of just a couple of minutes.

Why would people sail and tackle when they could motorize?

Why would people sketch or paint when they could take instant photos?

Why would we play acoustic guitars when there are electric ones

Why would some airline pilots enjoy sail planing?

Why would... (many more)

 

..



#28 Alen K

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 09:30 AM

I certainly understand why anyone would still do film astrophotography (AP). It is its own art form.

 

When I took my first astrophoto in 1977 there was ONLY film, of course, so there wasn't a decision for me to make. When I got serious about AP in the early 2000's, CCD cameras were all the rage and affordable DSLRs had just started to appear. But I stuck with film. I also manually guided, which was another throw-back to earlier times. (A glutton for punishment, I also polar aligned using the drift method and focused using a knife edge.) I really enjoyed the simple, mechanical nature of taking film photos in that way. I enjoyed the tactile nature of the 35mm slides I produced. I still have them preserved in a binder.  

 

But even then I could not go analog completely. A film scanner and my home computer were practical necessities in order to extract the most features and details from the slides. Analog techniques for image enhancement were limited and more difficult in comparison.

 

By 2008 I could see the handwriting on the wall for film. But I was very reluctant to go with digital acquisition. I didn't like the whole CCD thing (I tried it briefly) and DSLRs were IMO not mature enough. So I waited and waited and waited and waited... 

 

Life happened in the meantime and eventually I got a DSLR (only last year!). I kick myself for waiting so long. Not only does my DSLR have many advantages over film (you have heard them all before) but the results I am getting with it are so superior to what I got on film, it isn't funny. (You can compare images from both in my CN gallery.) As much as I enjoyed using film, I enjoy using my DSLR even more.

 

I got into astrophotography because it can reveal things that can't be seen visually in even the biggest telescopes. With the caveat that I don't like the process of using a dedicated astrocamera, which arguably would be even better for that goal, I am doing that better with a DSLR than I did with film.

 

But everyone has different goals and preferences. I don't knock anyone for deciding to use film because of a preference. It's certainly more challenging and that may be part of its appeal.  


Edited by Alen K, 06 October 2019 - 10:22 AM.

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#29 bwayne

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 10:08 AM

We should all be thankful that we can afford a camera - film or digital. After all there are people less fortunate who don’t have a camera and must resort to sketching with pencil and paper. It escapes me however that someone with a Tak 150 can’t afford a camera - poor budgeting I guess! 



#30 SMigol

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 09:16 AM

So I’ve procured the IDAS filter - now I’m afraid to clean it smile.gif Any precautions on how and what to use ? 

—Brett

The IDAS filters are pretty sturdy.

 

I've used distilled water and a microfiber cloth to get the worst of smudges off the surface.  For really sticky stuff, I've used methanol.

 

Most of the time the filter stays on the lens so the worst dust appears during pollen season.



#31 bwayne

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 08:25 AM

Thanks for the advice! We  don’t have methanol here ,  but we do have ethanol !  I was just a bit worried because I couldn’t find any instructions on these filters,  and a replacement looks to be very expensive :)




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