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"First light" with ASI224MC, Jupiter 22 August

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#1 Tulloch

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 06:32 PM

Hi all, my ASI224MC arrived in the mail yesterday and I had about 2 hours of clear sky last night to test it.

 

I had done a bit of pre-reading on how to set it up so it worked reasonably well (thanks to those who had put up their log files and additional tips on this forum, especially Darryl and Darren). This is obviously just a first try, so hopefully I'll be able to do better with a bit more practise but it seems to have worked this first time. 

 

A few observations I have on my experience:

 - I really miss the large sensor on the DSLR, after aligning the scope and attaching the camera it takes quite a while slewing around to find the planet

 - Firecapture is pretty intuative to use, after "borrowing" some of the settings others use I got a good image on the screen

 - The "Crop video" function is amazing, just set it up and it tracks the planet for you!

 - The Barlow gives me almost exactly a 2x larger image with the 224 - on the DSLR it gave me about 2.6x

 - Recording at 240 fps is amazing, I don't miss recording at 20 fps with the Canon

 - Having to almost re-start with Registax to find settings that work has not been fun, this is the part I hate the most (and understand the least)

 

and a couple of questions if people have time:

 - I found focusing is more difficult, and at the risk of starting another flame war, do people focus in colour or greyscale? Modify gamma? Blow up to 200% in the screen? Any other tips?

 - I tried using PIPP, but it seems to stuff up the de-bayering, no matter what setting I tried. If you use PIPP, do you debayer in PIPP, or let AS!3 do it?

 - The three images I made (two shown below) all have a sharpened arc effect on the RHS of the planet, which I can't seem to remove. I never had this problem with the DSLR images, is this common? Is this feature indicative of something else (eg poor focus, collimation etc)?

 - I have included my capture settings, anything stick out to anyone as being wrong? Not best practice?

 - How does Firecapture know how big and bright the planet is (40.09")? Is it talking to the internet?

 

Any advice, tips, answers much appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Andrew

 

Imaging details: Celestron Evolution 6" SCT @ f20.0 with 2x Barlow, ASI 224MC, 43000 frames at 240 fps (!!), 25% stacked in AS!3 with 3x drizzle, sharpened in Registax, final touches in Photoshop Elements, final image 50% larger than captured.

Attached Thumbnails

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#2 astro42

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 07:06 PM

Nice!


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#3 roelb

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 07:18 PM

The trick I use to find the planet:

align with cross hair eyepiece

mount image train without focusing

set gamma and exposure time high so the unfocused planet will be visible 

when not try higher de-focusing

align planet and focus


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#4 Kokatha man

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 07:31 PM

Very good "first light" images Andrew! waytogo.gif

 

No particular order here:

 

We quite often switch between colour & b&w screen views for focus assistance, with full gamma value (100) or around 3/4 (75) or none at all - seeing dictates this to a certain extent. I've always found blowing the scale up causes too much pixellation in the image to be of benefit personally...

 

If you need/want to use PIPP there is a box to tick that "protects Bayer Matrix" without debayering, ie leaving it to AS!3 - but I don't know whether it does this with ser files...but then again, I don't know why you're bothering with ser file captures anyway..! lol.gif

 

The artefact on the P limb (RHS) is on the sunlit side so a small amount of its' basis is the "diffraction rind" as on Mars...but much more is probably from wavelet sharpening...collimation can play a part here also.

 

You can employ a slightly sharpened image with no sharpened limb to address this problem...either by just using lesser wavelet sharpening or also from Registax6 "De-ringing" tool application with only the boxes for "Bright side" de-ringing ticked plus the required amount of slider value...just be aware that this also affects the entire disk to an extent  in denoising/blurring, so take that into account if going that path. wink.gif

 

Either way you use this image with the artefact non-existent as a layer Mask overlay & simply expose this on the more-sharpened disk's image...you are not doing anything this way except having the limb details somewhat more obscure which will be an element of a natural aspect of limb darkening in either WinJUPOS or using curves, levels, gamma or contrast etc in post-processing & helps the planet's aesthetic appeal regardless...

 

You can of course also just blur the sharpened disk's peripheries with selection &/or feathering...but in fact I find that a less sharpened disk with no limb artefact nearly always responds much better to some sort of deconvolution such as Lucy-Richardson in AstaImage etc...that is much simpler because you end up with a disk with the same amount of detail but virtually no limb artefact to deal with... wink.gif

 

It's the old story of a thousand ways to skin the cat with the simplest often being the easiest/quickest/most effective..! lol.gif

 

If you have your planet horizontal in FireCapture then FC is simply measuring the disk's diameter to calculate the effective f/l...the rest is from tables.

 

Everything in the log looks quite reasonable...you could easily add 30 seconds to the capture time & even drop the histogram back to 52%-55% to save a tad of gain, but it looks fine. smile.gif

 

Roel's suggestion for alignment is fine also - we get Jove onscreen every time we image & align the finder scope to it...lots of gain makes it pretty easy to find as does his defocusing suggestion also...once aligned we can then go to a reasonably nearby star for collimation & easily get our way back to Jove...*

 

* ps: I trust you're employing the full sensor to locate Jupiter..?!? :lol:


Edited by Kokatha man, 22 August 2019 - 07:39 PM.

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#5 petert913

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 07:57 PM

That's with a 6" SCT??  Wow, very well done and good seeing it seems.


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#6 Tulloch

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 08:09 PM

Very good "first light" images Andrew! waytogo.gif

 

No particular order here:

 

We quite often switch between colour & b&w screen views for focus assistance, with full gamma value (100) or around 3/4 (75) or none at all - seeing dictates this to a certain extent. I've always found blowing the scale up causes too much pixellation in the image to be of benefit personally...

 

If you need/want to use PIPP there is a box to tick that "protects Bayer Matrix" without debayering, ie leaving it to AS!3 - but I don't know whether it does this with ser files...but then again, I don't know why you're bothering with ser file captures anyway..! lol.gif

 

The artefact on the P limb (RHS) is on the sunlit side so a small amount of its' basis is the "diffraction rind" as on Mars...but much more is probably from wavelet sharpening...collimation can play a part here also.

 

You can employ a slightly sharpened image with no sharpened limb to address this problem...either by just using lesser wavelet sharpening or also from Registax6 "De-ringing" tool application with only the boxes for "Bright side" de-ringing ticked plus the required amount of slider value...just be aware that this also affects the entire disk to an extent  in denoising/blurring, so take that into account if going that path. wink.gif

 

Either way you use this image with the artefact non-existent as a layer Mask overlay & simply expose this on the more-sharpened disk's image...you are not doing anything this way except having the limb details somewhat more obscure which will be an element of a natural aspect of limb darkening in either WinJUPOS or using curves, levels, gamma or contrast etc in post-processing & helps the planet's aesthetic appeal regardless...

 

You can of course also just blur the sharpened disk's peripheries with selection &/or feathering...but in fact I find that a less sharpened disk with no limb artefact nearly always responds much better to some sort of deconvolution such as Lucy-Richardson in AstaImage etc...that is much simpler because you end up with a disk with the same amount of detail but virtually no limb artefact to deal with... wink.gif

 

It's the old story of a thousand ways to skin the cat with the simplest often being the easiest/quickest/most effective..! lol.gif

 

If you have your planet horizontal in FireCapture then FC is simply measuring the disk's diameter to calculate the effective f/l...the rest is from tables.

 

Everything in the log looks quite reasonable...you could easily add 30 seconds to the capture time & even drop the histogram back to 52%-55% to save a tad of gain, but it looks fine. smile.gif

 

Roel's suggestion for alignment is fine also - we get Jove onscreen every time we image & align the finder scope to it...lots of gain makes it pretty easy to find as does his defocusing suggestion also...once aligned we can then go to a reasonably nearby star for collimation & easily get our way back to Jove...*

 

* ps: I trust you're employing the full sensor to locate Jupiter..?!? lol.gif

Thanks Darryl, as usual, much appreciated.

 

I'll try playing with the gamma setting while focusing in the future - I assume it needs to be "off" when capturing though.

 

I assumed everyone saved in ser format - but when I went back to your fc "template" post here, I see you save in avi. I'll do that from now, thanks.

 

I'll do some reading on "diffration rind" - I missed Mars last year as I wasn't into AA yet foreheadslap.gif, hopefully I'll get a go next year. I haven't bought AstraImage yet, I'll play around with the demo version and see how I go and play with de-ringing in Registax. It's interesting that I never saw this problem with the DSLR, but maybe it's just a one-off with this data. Have you tried the wavelet sharpening in AstraImage - I'm pretty sure you use Registax, just wondering if there's an advantage one way or the other?

 

With the alignment issue, I think it's more to do with my mount than anything. I align using an eyepiece with a de-focused image (I don't change the focus from the camera settings) so I align with a "donut" instead of a point. When I replace the eyepiece with the camera, I assume the weight difference tilts the scope one way or the other. With the heavy DSLR it moved quite a bit, but the 22.3 x 14.9 mm sensor size meant I could usually find it easily, the 4.8 x 3.6 mm sensor on the 224 makes it a bit more difficult, especially with a 2x Barlow in the train smile.gif. I probably should remove the Barlow first ... and yes, I'm using the full sensor to find the planet lol.gif .

 

With the planet size, FC just knows how big it is from a lookup table that's installed with the software?

 

The USB traffic setting - I put it a 80 for no other reason that it was close to the setting you had it at (85). What does it actually do?

 

Thanks again,

 

Andrew



#7 stargazer60

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 08:33 PM

Nice image.  Keep up the great work.waytogo.gif 


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#8 Tulloch

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 08:43 PM

That's with a 6" SCT??  Wow, very well done and good seeing it seems.

Yep, a 6" SCT and the seeing was just OK, jetstream about 50 m/s and some high clouds so not ideal.

 

Of course, Jupiter was sitting about about 60 degrees altitude so that helps grin.gif .



#9 DMach

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 09:53 PM

Hi all, my ASI224MC arrived in the mail yesterday and I had about 2 hours of clear sky last night to test it.

 

I had done a bit of pre-reading on how to set it up so it worked reasonably well (thanks to those who had put up their log files and additional tips on this forum, especially Darryl and Darren). This is obviously just a first try, so hopefully I'll be able to do better with a bit more practise but it seems to have worked this first time. 

 

A few observations I have on my experience:

 - I really miss the large sensor on the DSLR, after aligning the scope and attaching the camera it takes quite a while slewing around to find the planet

 - Firecapture is pretty intuative to use, after "borrowing" some of the settings others use I got a good image on the screen

 - The "Crop video" function is amazing, just set it up and it tracks the planet for you!

 - The Barlow gives me almost exactly a 2x larger image with the 224 - on the DSLR it gave me about 2.6x

 - Recording at 240 fps is amazing, I don't miss recording at 20 fps with the Canon

 - Having to almost re-start with Registax to find settings that work has not been fun, this is the part I hate the most (and understand the least)

 

and a couple of questions if people have time:

 - I found focusing is more difficult, and at the risk of starting another flame war, do people focus in colour or greyscale? Modify gamma? Blow up to 200% in the screen? Any other tips?

 - I tried using PIPP, but it seems to stuff up the de-bayering, no matter what setting I tried. If you use PIPP, do you debayer in PIPP, or let AS!3 do it?

 - The three images I made (two shown below) all have a sharpened arc effect on the RHS of the planet, which I can't seem to remove. I never had this problem with the DSLR images, is this common? Is this feature indicative of something else (eg poor focus, collimation etc)?

 - I have included my capture settings, anything stick out to anyone as being wrong? Not best practice?

 - How does Firecapture know how big and bright the planet is (40.09")? Is it talking to the internet?

 

Any advice, tips, answers much appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Andrew

 

Imaging details: Celestron Evolution 6" SCT @ f20.0 with 2x Barlow, ASI 224MC, 43000 frames at 240 fps (!!), 25% stacked in AS!3 with 3x drizzle, sharpened in Registax, final touches in Photoshop Elements, final image 50% larger than captured.

That's a very nice first light indeed Andrew, congrats!

 

For finding the target, yes, this can be a bit of a pain with the small sensor. It doesn't help that the focal point changes between eyepiece and imaging train, plus I also find that there's a bit of a shift between the eyepiece and the imaging train ... what I find helps is to release the eyepiece clamp and just hold it in place (and flat) by hand, then centre the de-focused planet** whilst viewing this way. Usually gets me close enough that I will catch a glimpse of the planet at least whilst inserting the imaging train. Holding the imaging train manually so I can see the target, I check which way the target moves using the hand controller in case the planet disappears off the sensor upon tightening the clamp (obviously watching the screen as I tighten the clamp to see which way the planet went).

 

**Once you do have the imaging train all set up, aligned and focused, it's worth quickly putting the eyepiece back in place (again, holding it flat by hand) and taking note how far out of focus the target is ... as you probably already know, if your target is not close enough to focus you may not even see it via the camera, even if perfectly aligned.

 

For focusing, I use the "increase gamma and exposure" trick - this increases the contrast and makes it easier to see the details you're trying to focus on. I think it was Grant who shared an awesome tip on this recently: if you use the "screen adjustment" tool, you can change the gamma etc. without impacting the actual image capture settings.

 

FC Screen Adjust.jpg

 

I find I can't leave this turned on during image capture itself, perhaps because I use "crop video" and it's taxing the software too much. But it's still much easier to simply turn Screen Adjustment on and off than adjust the acquisition settings themselves ... and it remembers the last settings you used!

 

Similar to what Darryl said, I actually find it easier to focus with the image magnification at < 1:1 ... reducing the image is effectively a form of sharpening, I find it helps me see the details better. (I use this same trick in the final step of image processing ... adjust the image scale down until I get what I feel is a balance between size and sharpness.)

 

As for the "rind" / ringing / Gibbs artefact you're seeing, that's probably (unfortunately) just a consequence of capturing sharper data! It will always be there to a degree, and is more obvious at smaller apertures. The fact that you're seeing it so cleanly probably means you're pretty close with focus! As Darryl said, collimation can play a part - from personal experience I can say playing close attention to collimation helps reduce the ringing. I love using MetaGuide for this job ... this allows you to collimate using the Airy disk of an in-focus star and (more importantly) with the imaging train in place!

 

Have fun, excited to see more of your images!


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#10 Tulloch

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 10:56 PM

Thanks all for your likes, comments and advice.

 

I had a play with the de-ringing tool in Registax and it seems to work pretty well, at least well enough for the time being (see below).

 

I don't think I can make my screen image any smaller Darren, remember it's only a 6" and I'm only getting an image about 150 pixels across! I will look into the Screen Resolution tool, that looks like it could be very useful.

 

Andrew

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#11 Foc

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 12:14 AM

Great first light Andrew,

Lots of detail there for this time of the opposition cycle. And even better if you had wind as well.

Though I do wonder if you will miss the different aesthetics the DSLR image puts out.

 

I fully agree that a bit of enlargement in firecapture helps for a visual check on focus with small scopes (try a 4 inch if you think a 6 inch troublesome) if as it happens, like me you are not (yet) an eagle eyed 70 year old!  A smaller image is sharper but in the 4-6 inch telescope range trying to see on firecapture definition on tiny features through an inland atmospheric flux can be pretty tiring on the eyes.  

 

But otherwise I often use a similar approach to Darren for the initial alignment of the planet on the sensor. But like you I tend not to focus the eyepiece until it is on the sensor as usually I have previously targeted the moon with camera (easy for locating even with a small sensor and then obtaining (allowing for a bit of mirror movement) at least a rough focus) or if using the same imaging train, then focus will be similar enough to the previous night to just need a very fine adjustment.


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#12 Rustler46

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 12:56 AM

 a couple of questions if people have time:

 - I found focusing is more difficult ... Any other tips?

 - ...

 - How does Firecapture know how big and bright the planet is (40.09")? Is it talking to the internet?

 

Any advice, tips, answers much appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Andrew

Here are some techniques I use that might be helpful for others to consider.

 

When I align my Losmandy G-11 mount (on a permanent pier) for go-to functionality, I use the "warm restart" function. This preserves the previous pointing model, requiring an alignment centering on only a single star. For this I use a 40mm low power eyepiece without cross hairs. Then I defocus the star a bit in the clockwise direction on my C-11's focus knob. Then the camera is substituted for the 40mm eyepiece.

 

A "go-to Saturn" operation is performed (for example). Then a look through the Telrad finder verifies the planet is at least grossly found. Some small adjustments to pointing direction can get it centered in the finder bull's eye. If then the planet isn't on the small 3.2 X 5.6 mm sensor of the ASI290MC camera, I institute the mount's "object search" function with the FOV chosen at the smallest 5 arc-minute size. This does a spiral search around the area. When Saturn comes across the FOV the search is terminated via the hand paddle.

 

I've found that focusing in the way described will ensure that the planet is well enough focused that it can be seen in the spiral search. Otherwise it might be so far out of focus that it isn't recognized when it comes across the FOV during the search.

 

As for focus with the camera I look for the smallest details to be visible. Seeing is usually bad enough that these are just fleetingly seen. Focus is difficult with the stock focus system of the SCT (moving mirror). I'm considering re-installing my JMI EV-1 Crayford focuser on the back of the C-11. The EV-1 has a motorized focuser operated by a hand controller. Thus it's not necessary to touch the telescope to adjust focus.

 

Perhaps more useful is that focus settings are repeatable. This is because the focuser has a scale on the focus adjustment knob. So focusing would go something like this. Is it sharper at setting 4.37? Or was it better at 4.38? I would think being able to get exactly repeatable focus settings is a huge plus, not available with the standard moving mirror focus system. Also mirror shift won't be as much a problem.

 

I've also wondered how FireCapture knows Saturn's angular size. Perhaps it has the size related to the point it is in its orbit as indicated by capture date. Maybe a table of opposition dates would also account for the Earth's orbit influencing angular size. But once it has that information (along with pixel pitch) it can calculate the telescope's focal length - interesting and useful.

 

Best Regards,

Russ


Edited by Rustler46, 23 August 2019 - 01:00 AM.


#13 Tulloch

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 01:27 AM

Great first light Andrew,

Lots of detail there for this time of the opposition cycle. And even better if you had wind as well.

Though I do wonder if you will miss the different aesthetics the DSLR image puts out.

 

I fully agree that a bit of enlargement in firecapture helps for a visual check on focus with small scopes (try a 4 inch if you think a 6 inch troublesome) if as it happens, like me you are not (yet) an eagle eyed 70 year old!  A smaller image is sharper but in the 4-6 inch telescope range trying to see on firecapture definition on tiny features through an inland atmospheric flux can be pretty tiring on the eyes.  

 

But otherwise I often use a similar approach to Darren for the initial alignment of the planet on the sensor. But like you I tend not to focus the eyepiece until it is on the sensor as usually I have previously targeted the moon with camera (easy for locating even with a small sensor and then obtaining (allowing for a bit of mirror movement) at least a rough focus) or if using the same imaging train, then focus will be similar enough to the previous night to just need a very fine adjustment.

Thanks for your comments, you are correct, it is a different look and feel to the images from the DSLR, but I was moving towards this colour balance anyway. When I get a clear night I still plan on doing some side-by-side comparisons (as best as I am able), it looks like Tuesday night might be the next best time based on the weather apps here.

 

Focusing with the stock standard SCT focuser is difficult but not impossible. I really miss the FWHM feature in BackyardEOS which gave a readout of the moon's diameter as focus changed, this was very helpful. A secondary Crayford would be good, but comes at more expense  However, hopefully with a bit more time and practice I'll get it right. 

 

Checking alignment and rough focus with the moon after changing to the camera is great, unfortunately the moon isn't always visible (Iike last night)!



#14 Tulloch

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 01:34 AM

Here are some techniques I use that might be helpful for others to consider.

 

When I align my Losmandy G-11 mount (on a permanent pier) for go-to functionality, I use the "warm restart" function. This preserves the previous pointing model, requiring an alignment centering on only a single star. For this I use a 40mm low power eyepiece without cross hairs. Then I defocus the star a bit in the clockwise direction on my C-11's focus knob. Then the camera is substituted for the 40mm eyepiece.

 

A "go-to Saturn" operation is performed (for example). Then a look through the Telrad finder verifies the planet is at least grossly found. Some small adjustments to pointing direction can get it centered in the finder bull's eye. If then the planet isn't on the small 3.2 X 5.6 mm sensor of the ASI290MC camera, I institute the mount's "object search" function with the FOV chosen at the smallest 5 arc-minute size. This does a spiral search around the area. When Saturn comes across the FOV the search is terminated via the hand paddle.

 

As for focus with the camera I look for the smallest details to be visible. Seeing is usually bad enough that these are just fleetingly seen. Focus is difficult with the stock focus system of the SCT (moving mirror). I'm considering re-installing my JMI EV-1 Crayford focuser on the back of the C-11. The EV-1 has a motorized focuser operated by a hand controller. Thus it's not necessary to touch the telescope to adjust focus.

 

Perhaps more useful is that focus settings are repeatable. This is because the focuser has a scale on the focus adjustment knob. So focusing would go something like this. Is it sharper at setting 4.37? Or was it better at 4.38? I would think being able to get exactly repeatable focus settings is a huge plus, not available with the standard moving mirror focus system. Also mirror shift won't be as much a problem.

 

Best Regards,

Russ

Thanks Russ, some of the features on your system are very attractive. The warm restart, the "object search" function sounds amazing and the dedicated electronic focuser would be fantastic - but alas I have none of these bawling.gif.

 

Andrew



#15 BQ Octantis

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 02:34 AM

Bewdy, mate!

 

BQ



#16 RedLionNJ

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 08:07 AM

Makes quite a difference to the frame rates, eh, Andrew? :)

 

FireCapture is truly awesome. And when you consider the incredible performance you get from it, even though it's written in java (not trying to start a technology war, here!) - it's just incredible.

 

As far as determining planet sizes, satellite positions, etc - it's all (roughly) calculated within a couple modules within FC. No internet necessary :)

 

As you expand to imaging more than one planet, that's when a lot of the settings (ROI, cut-out size, gain, exposure time, etc.) really come into their own. All you do is pick the appropriate planet and all settings for that planet will be remembered.

 

There's a set of "display settings" which you can use to help judge focus better - as mentioned above, increasing the display gamma is the way to go. Most people would refer to this as decreasing gamma, but Torsten's interpretation is a little different. But this can be made to only apply to the display - that's the cool part. The actual data being captured ignores this setting.

 

As for putting a target on the tiny chip at a ridiculously-long focal length for the size of the sensor - different techniques work for different folks. When I had an LX200 fork mount, I relied heavily on a well-aligned 9x60 RACI. I could put a planet (even Neptune) right in the middle of the cross-hairs and it would be on my full-resolution sensor with the ADC in the null position.  I still sometimes use this technique these days, but now I have a better mount which can actually put the target on the sensor most of the time by itself. And if I screw-up (like don't put the ADC to null), there's always the 9x60 RACI still hanging out there.

 

I'm sure you've already realized this - but the smaller the ROI, the faster the frame rate can be. Using the cut-out is a little different, as the entire ROI still gets transferred to the PC before the data is trimmed to be saved. But having the cut-out follow the planet is very useful because it totally eliminates any need for that extra PIPP step.  I believe I mentioned to you a while back the regime you were (quite successfully) using with the DSLR was a bit on the painful side. The fewer pieces of software needed, the better.  I am not anti-PIPP and have used it myself for a variety of purposes, but it has no place in my regular imaging regime.

 

Focus in colour or raw?  Colour is easier, but once you become familiar with the appearance in raw, it can be done that way, too. Just takes a bit of practice.  Sometimes toggling between the two modes on the ASI224MC can cause the driver to hang for a few seconds, so I prefer to leave it in raw mode these days. I see no benefit to viewing at more than 100%, but I sure wouldn't view it at less than 100% and expect to get best focus.

 

Welcome to the world of hundreds of gigabytes some nights!

 

Grant


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#17 Billytk

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 05:04 PM

Amazing result for a first time out!


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#18 Tulloch

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:10 PM

Amazing result for a first time out!

Thanks Billy, first time with the camera, obviously not first time with the equipment smile.gif .

 

My first capture of the night was where I didn't use the Crop video mode and so managed to get Ganymede in the full 1304x976 FOV. Due to the large image size the sample rate was "only" 100 fps and I limited the capture to 10000 frames. I also played with the "Healing brush" tool in Photoshop to remove the ringing (or "rind") induced by the wavelet sharpening which I think has done a pretty good job, much more satisfying than the de-ringing feature in Registax.

 

Submitted for your critique...

 

Andrew

Attached Thumbnails

  • 2019-08-22-1024_8-L-Jup wave15 colbal ps1sm.jpg

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#19 Rustler46

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:55 PM

 I also played with the "Healing brush" tool in Photoshop to remove the ringing (or "rind") induced by the wavelet sharpening which I think has done a pretty good job, much more satisfying than the de-ringing feature in Registax.

Hi Andrew,

Great results with your new camera! I'm intrigued by the healing brush you mentioned. I only have access to Photoshop Elements 2.0 for a pixel editor. If it has the healing brush feature, I'll give that a try. Sometimes the sharpening we do with Registax produces great results over most of the image, but negative consequences on the edges and high contrast features. Personally I'm not opposed to some "artistic license" in making a better lunar/planetary image. After all usually these are never meant to be scientifically accurate. But it might be best to admit when such measure have been applied. But again that's my personal view on matters.

Regards,
Russ



#20 Tulloch

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:20 PM

Hi Andrew,

Great results with your new camera! I'm intrigued by the healing brush you mentioned. I only have access to Photoshop Elements 2.0 for a pixel editor. If it has the healing brush feature, I'll give that a try. Sometimes the sharpening we do with Registax produces great results over most of the image, but negative consequences on the edges and high contrast features. Personally I'm not opposed to some "artistic license" in making a better lunar/planetary image. After all usually these are never meant to be scientifically accurate. But it might be best to admit when such measure have been applied. But again that's my personal view on matters.

Regards,
Russ

Thanks Russ, as far as I'm concerned, once you start processing your images with anything (AS!3, Registax, Photoshop) you've already changed the "pure" photo, so all options are on the table. The healing brush is just repairing the artifacts introduced by another software tool.

 

I have Photoshop Elements 6, and the healing brush tool icon looks like a bandage in the toolbox area. To use it, you select an area next to the area you wish to heal that has the same colour or brightness (alt-click on the PC), then click and wipe over the area you want to heal. I have before and after shots below with only the bottom half (the 3 darker stripes and below) healed, it's obviously magnified here but is almost undetectable at a more normal size. There are a couple of options to use with it, I use "Normal" mode with 100% hardness and 1% spacing.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Andrew

Attached Thumbnails

  • Healing 1.JPG
  • Healing 2.JPG

Edited by Tulloch, 23 August 2019 - 10:22 PM.

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#21 Billytk

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:04 AM

Thanks Billy, first time with the camera, obviously not first time with the equipment smile.gif .

 

My first capture of the night was where I didn't use the Crop video mode and so managed to get Ganymede in the full 1304x976 FOV. Due to the large image size the sample rate was "only" 100 fps and I limited the capture to 10000 frames. I also played with the "Healing brush" tool in Photoshop to remove the ringing (or "rind") induced by the wavelet sharpening which I think has done a pretty good job, much more satisfying than the de-ringing feature in Registax.

 

Submitted for your critique...

 

Andrew

That picture is every bit as good as what I get with my 9.25.


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#22 Tulloch

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:35 AM

That picture is every bit as good as what I get with my 9.25.

Thanks Bill, as I said earlier the high altitude (60+ degrees) sure helps here.

 

Andrew


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