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#1 starprincess66

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:45 AM

Hi my name is chris Hart

 I am new to this sight,I am really interested in learning about Basic Astronomy,just wanting 

To learn how to identify,certain objects in the skies,I already had know how to find the Big,and little Dipper,I would love to learn how to identify constalations,I would also like to learn about the early Universe,I dont know that much about the Big Bang,but would love to learn.

  What you dont know  about me

    I am from  Peoria,I'LL,and I am a wife and homemaker,I like to read,I like to workout at my 

Health club,I love just lounging at home,watching tv,or playing on my tablet.

 I sometimes like to color in my Adult  coloring book,it helps me to relax.


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#2 Jeff Struve

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 08:08 AM

Hi and welcome to CN!

 

We are in neighboring communities as I am in Davenport, Iowa!

 

You are always welcome to hang out with our local club... the Quad Cities Astronomical Society. We meet on the 3rd Monday of the month at St. Ambrose University... guests ALWAYS welcome! We have a new web site at www.QCAstro.org and we are on FaceBook at QCAS... check us out there too!

 

We have a public night at one of our observatory locations tomorrow night... the Quad Cities Astronomical Society's Jens-Wendt Observatory at Sherman Park, just outside of Dixon Iowa.

 

We are also affiliated with St. Ambrose University's Menke Observatory, help them with their events, and we hold our annual star party there... the Eastern Iowa Star Party. (Sept 27-29)

 

For your learning more cool astronomy stuff... download to a PC tyhe free planetarium program called Stellarium. Easy to use, can be quite helpful whether you are a new comer or a long time observer!

 

Welcome again!

Jeff    


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#3 PirateMike

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 08:40 AM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights. waytogo.gif

 

There are a lot of good videos on Youtube about the early universe as well as a lot of other cool space stuff.

 

 

Miguel   8-)

 

.



#4 vtornado

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 08:59 AM

Welcome to the forum Chris,  welcome.gif

 

An excellent book for leaning the constellations is "The Stars" by H. A. Rey. (Yes of curious George fame)

You can probably get a copy through interlibrary loan.

 

Another excellent teaching tool is star safari,  If is an ap you can download to a cell phone or tablet.

It will show you where every constellation is in real time at your current location.  You can hold it

up at the sky and it will show you what constellation you are looking at.  For thousands of objects

it has pages of interesting facts and history.

 

Since you haven't asked about telescopes, a good starting tool is a pair of binoculars.

Anything you have around the house is a good start, as long as they aren't those mini-ones.

 

Coloring is very relaxing, I used to do it with my kids, they have moved. on, unfortunately. 

 

VT



#5 aeajr

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:23 AM

starprincess66,

Love the name!

Welcome to CN. Glad you decided to join.

 



#6 sg6

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:52 AM

For the constellations the only real option is to get outside and start looking.the big dipper

 

Easy one is Cassiopeia.

3 others are from using the big dipper - also just in case the dipper is not actually a constellation, it is a part of a the bigger one Ursa Maj and as such is technically termed as Asterism. An Astrism being that odd thing being a pattern of stars but not a constellation.

 

Right the other 3:

The 2 pointers in the big dipper point "up" to the Pole star. Go the other direction "down" and they point to Leo.

 

2nd, follow the handle round in an arc and you get to the red satr Arcturus. That is the main star in Bootes. Arcturus is prominent the others are not so but if dark they can be identified.

 

3rd: The 2 stars that form the top of the pan follow across the sky away from the dipper and you meet a bright star, that is Capella, the main star of Auriga.

 

So Dipper to 3 additional.

 

Another Asterism: Basically look up. Should see 3 bright stars. Called the Summer Triangle. Compose of Deneb, Vega and Altair.

Deneb is the main star of Cygnus and the stars can be fairly easily identified. Cygnus look for a sort of cross, with Deneb at the top. There are more the the cross bit but that is the easy bit.

 

Vega is part of Lyra and Altair part of Aquila, not many are overly bright except Altair.

Aquila is a bit "odd" I have seen 3 different ways of creating the constellation shape.

 

Suppose a simple guide is a planesphere, small easy and have the diagrams on them.

I like The Monthly Sky Guide by Ridpath and Tirion.

 

If there is anything to see then binoculars may help, at least a bit. But they are not the same as a telescope. Similar in a way but not the same.

 

So get outside and just quietly and steadily learn. Not overly hard, great fun and people seem impressed.

 

If possible add "Peoria" to your profile and where that is. I read it as Pretoria at first.


Edited by sg6, 23 August 2019 - 09:54 AM.


#7 Starman27

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:35 AM

Welcome to CN Chris. I've  spent much of ten years visiting Peoria for business. They have an excellent astronomy club with many resources available to the public. I'm sure they would be able to guide you.  https://www.facebook...onomicalSociety


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#8 starprincess66

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 05:19 AM

Thank you eveyone for the welcome to the forum,if I have any questions I will certainly ask

As I am very interested and am wanting to  learn,as much as I possibly can,we live in a Condo,so every morning if its not clody,I stand out on the porch,and look at the stars.

  Ps

 I was wondering if there is an Astronomy Group here in the Peoria area which is where im from,I cant really go to Iowa to  be part of a group,but would love to  be part of a group that 

Meets here in the tri county Area.

 I will be sure  to  Download the App that was suggested to me,and in the meantime if I have 

Questions I will be sure to  ask.

Once again thank you for the Awsome welcome



#9 Mr. Mike

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 06:11 AM

Welcome! And....go slow.  There is LOTS to learn and absorb.  And billions of objects to eventually look at. Learn the sky first.  Baby steps.  It’s a terrific hobby and this forum is always here to make it even better. 



#10 starprincess66

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 06:40 AM

Actually when my mom and I went to Florida for a mother daughter trip,we visited the 

Nasa space center,and I as i was looking in one of the gift shops,I spotted a jump sute with 

Nasa patches on it,and as i was purchasing it,the Lady behind the counter told me,that it is

The original jumpsuit that was warn by the real Nasa Astronauts,I was surprised to hear that the jumpsuit that I purchased,was the original one warn by the Nasa Astronauts,but that is what she told me.bow.gif bow.gif waytogo.gif waytogo.gif



#11 starprincess66

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:29 AM

As a new member  I also want to mention,that I  am a free spirit, a person that marches to the beat of my own  drum,just being a free spirit gives me the opportunity to explore different paths in life,I am so much happier with where i am in life,and with just starting this new Hobby I am starting out by focusing on the  big dipper,to start.confused1.gif confused1.gif bow.gif waytogo.gif


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#12 Subaru45

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:56 AM

In post #7 a link to the Peoria Astronomical Society was mentioned.



#13 Starman27

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 11:13 AM

He's right.  Peoria has an excellent astronomy club with many resources available to the public. I'm sure they would be able to guide you.  https://www.facebook...onomicalSociety


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#14 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 11:25 AM

Hello,

 

I can't suggest a pair of binoculars to you, as those have to be held up with the arms and hands to use them.  The mere thought of that makes my arms ache, therefore I don't use binoculars myself for astronomy.  They can be mounted upon a photo-tripod, for cameras, but that's just an extra expense for an optical device with a rather small aperture and at a fixed power.  I did bring out a pair not too long ago, and saw a flock of geese or other wonderfully contrasted against a starry background.  I then took the binoculars back inside, and brought out one of my telescopes.

 

The nice thing about a telescope is that you can change the powers, and have a larger aperture in addition.  You can look at an object in the sky at a low-power, a medium-power, and a high-power, with just a few eyepieces, two or three; not a lot.

 

Have you thought about getting a telescope?  If you're unsure about that, there may be a local library(ies) or astronomy club(s) in your area that loans out telescopes for short periods, like a library book.

 

In any event, welcome to this, our most hallowed pastime.



#15 Starman27

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:16 PM

Bloomington just up the road from Peoria also has a great Astronomy club. Clubs often have public nights. Check them out and go to one. Also most club meeting are open to the public.



#16 Stephen1952

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Posted 01 September 2019 - 08:38 AM

Welcome to the forum!  I used to be on CN 15 years (long orbit) ago but had to put the hobby on hold.  Just got interested again this past few days and have ordered a new scope.  I am now retired so have more time.  Forgot my old screen name, so I have to make a new one! 




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