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1st telescope

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#1 Blatzvid

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:26 AM

Hello guys,

 

I'm want to buy my 1st telescope, until a few hours, I was 100% on getting a PowerSeeker 127eq, but then I discovered this fórum and the opinions about this telescope and now Im uncertain about it...

 

My budget is about 220usd or 200euros and my objectives are to observe the moon, planets (Júpiter/Saturn and rings) and if possible maybe some stars/galaxies.

 

Can you give me your best and honest advise? 

 

Thank you!

 

 


Edited by Blatzvid, 23 August 2019 - 09:44 AM.


#2 dmgriff

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:09 AM

https://www.teleskop...rd-focuser.html

 

The above link is to a GSO(Taiwan) D=150mm, F=1200mm, f/8 newtonian optical tube (parabolic primary) on a dobsonian alt/az mount. The tube and focuser, finder, are metal, I believe. I have a old GSO, Hardin branded, 150mm f/8 dob, and I think it is excellent for a mass produced scope. Sharp optics.

 

A 150mm f/8 newtonian is a great all around scope. Good for lunar/planetary/clusters and some nebulae.

 

A great starter (or keeper) scope, imo, within your budget.

 

I noticed TS also has 130mm f/5, and 150mm f/5, newtonians on a EQ3-1 mount. I do not know if the focuser and finder are metal or plastic. If interested in looking at one of those scopes, I would inquire with TS if the optics are parabolic. If not parabolic, I would pass on them.  The 150mm/1200mm f/8 ota is a better planetary scope.

 

https://www.teleskop...ount-EQ3-1.html

 

Good viewing,

 

Dave


Edited by dmgriff, 23 August 2019 - 10:12 AM.

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#3 petert913

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:09 AM

With that budget, I would look for a used telescope.  Maybe a nice 6" Dobsonian.

 

Or one of these would be good !

 

https://tinyurl.com/y35taj3w


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#4 sg6

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:11 AM

What do you want the scope to do?

Why do you want one/it?

 

Half the time, maybe 80%, it seems people are impressed by big numbers.

Buy a Dobsonian it is the biggest aperture you will get per $/€

Buy a Mak/SCT, biggest focal length so biggest magnification you will get.

 

Someone asked similar a few days back. I suggested an ES Firstlight 80/640 refractor. Small aperture and you might get 120x out of it for Saturn. That is it.

 

How about: Inexpensive, easy to use, will show 90% of most things, if you progress you can get an AZ GTi wifi in 6 months and put scope on that. And you have a nice goto. Build a solar filter and you can view the sun, add a Herschell Wedge and you get better views of the sun and sunspots and can see the Mercury Transit in November.

 

If astronomy is not for you after the first purchase you have not spend much.

 

What it doesn't do is allow you to talk of "most" or "biggest", "easiest" maybe but not the first 2.

 

Where are you as you mention $ and €.

 

Answers will be "Buy a dobsonian" (large aperture) and/or "Buy the 127" (High magnification).


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#5 Jeff Struve

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:12 AM

Are there any clubs near you? Can you do a Google search for "Astronomy clubs in ....."?

 

The reason that i say this are as follows:

  • Club members like to show their gear and through a club you'll be able to many types of scopes... how they are set up, configured, transported, and what objects they work well on.
  • Club's often times have loaner gear that you can use/learn on. This way, if you find that you need a larger budget to get what works best for you, you'll have something to use in the mean time.
  • Many times clubs and/or club members have great used gear that they'll sell at great price. A couple other benefits are that you can see the actual item, try before you buy, find out if there are things that you need to buy that are not included, and get one on training on that piece of gear.
  • Clubs in your area are more apt to provide you with geographic concerns as to what gear may work best, are more available to purchase, and that can be more easily repaired.  

 

To me, even if it is a few hours each way to a club and/or public events, its well worth the one on one, hands on approach.

 

Clear Skies!

Jeff 


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#6 cookjaiii

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:18 AM

The PowerSeeker is a Bird-Jones design, as you have undoubtedly discovered.  You would do better to get a traditional Newtonian with a parabolic mirror if you are looking for something in that aperture range.

 

I started with an AWB OneSky which is a 130mm f/5 tabletop Newtonian and that's in your price range.  Since you stated your budget in dollars and Euros, I'm guessing you are in Europe.  The same scope outside the US is called the Skywatcher Heritage 130p.  There is also an older discontinued version called the Bushnell Aries 5 that you might find used.

 

What I liked about it was that it was lightweight, compact, and very capable - even in a red-zone..  It has a Vixen-style dovetail so you can upgrade to a tripod very easily. There is also a long-running and active thread about the scope here on CN, so you have a lot of expertise ready and available if you have questions.

 

Have fun with your research and welcome to Cloudy Nights!


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#7 Star Geezer

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:18 AM

My first scope was the PowerSeeker 127eq and I'm holding on to this one. Mine is a testament to what a properly assembled Bird should be.

 

This question gets asked a lot. Last night I viewed the Moon, the Planets, Double Stars and a Galaxy with 10x-25x50 Zoom Binoculars. What you need to be more specific about is how you would like to view the Moon, the Planets, Stars and Galaxies.

 

I think a 4-6 inch f/8 dobsonian reflector would make a good beginner general observing instrument.


Edited by Star Geezer, 23 August 2019 - 10:21 AM.

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#8 Taosmath

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:27 AM

Above posts all make good points.

 

My personal preference, is that I don't like using an equatorial mount for visual observing.  I find that I have to twist around a lot to see through the eyepiece .

 

For that reason I think a 6" f8 dob is a good choice.  It's easy and obvious to use, robust, no electronics to get confused by and has a large enough aperture to let you see thousands of objects  including some deep sky objects.

 

Buying used is a good idea since with a 200 Euro budget if you bought new (such as the good recommendation made above by dmgriff) you will only get one eyepiece .  If you bought a good used scope, you could get a barlow or another eyepiece that would be useful to you.


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#9 Blatzvid

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:47 AM

Thanks for all the recommendations!

Im from Portugal and in these nights Im able to see both Saturn and Jupiter, but with binoculars I struggle to get a decent view plus I cant really observe the planets, they're just tiny dots.

What I want to is see these planets, rings, and another with some quality, I think with that budget is possible or not?

Edited by Blatzvid, 23 August 2019 - 10:48 AM.


#10 vtornado

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:50 AM

Welcome to the form Blatzvid,

 

I Second the motion for a 130mm f/5 table top dob.

Very capable, very compact, in your price range.

You will have to learn to collimate it.

 

Second choice would be a fast refractor on an atl-az mount

80mm f/5 or f/6.   Most of these are made in the same factory and will

perform the same optically.  You will be searching for the one with the

best mount.  Many low cost scopes skimp on the mount.

 

An 80mm f/11 will do well on the planets, but again you have to get one on

a mount that will hold it steady.  Planets require high power and the

ability to nudge the scope along to follow.

 

The 130 f/5 does well on planets, the table top dob mount is inherently stable.


Edited by vtornado, 23 August 2019 - 10:52 AM.

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#11 Sky Muse

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:00 AM

Hello guys,

 

I'm want to buy my 1st telescope, until a few hours, I was 100% on getting a PowerSeeker 127eq, but then I discovered this fórum and the opinions about this telescope and now Im uncertain about it...

 

My budget is about 220usd or 200euros and my objectives are to observe the moon, planets (Júpiter/Saturn and rings) and if possible maybe some stars/galaxies.

 

Can you give me your best and honest advise?

 

Thank you!

I have a Celestron "PowerSeeker" 127EQ, but I feel that it's for advanced users, not for beginners.  The telescope can involve a LOT of work in order to provide decent views.  It is perhaps the most difficult telescope on the planet to collimate, and many arrive at the door-step mis-collimated; my own did.  The EQ-1 mount that comes with the kit is too small and spindly to support the telescope properly.  I won't even try to mount and use my OTA on an EQ-1.  The EQ-1 is the smallest of equatorial mounts, for cameras and small telescopes.  A 127mm telescope requires at least a larger EQ-2, or a larger alt-azimuth mount.  My advice is to skip this one.

 

If you want at around a 130mm aperture, and an equatorial in order to track objects...

 

https://www.teleskop...ton-on-EQ2.html

 

There is also this kit to consider...

 

https://www.teleskop...--6years--.html

 

...or this one...

 

https://www.teleskop...rd-focuser.html


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#12 Sky Muse

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:37 AM

What I want to is see these planets, rings, and another with some quality, I think with that budget is possible or not?

Absolutely; a 5" to 6" Newtonian or Newtonian-Dobson will show you that and much more, and they are much easier to collimate than a "PowerSeeker" 127mm.

 

A Newtonian does require a regular routine of collimation, perhaps an initial collimation upon its arrival.  You would need tools to collimate...

 

https://garyseronik....-what-you-dont/

 

Collimation instructions... http://www.astro-bab...nian-reflector/

 

That's just one of many resources that you'll find on the subject of collimation.

 

If you'd rather not have to collimate a telescope, you can choose a refractor, but with a smaller aperture, as lenses are more difficult and costly to produce over mirrors...

 

https://www.teleskop...ctic-mount.html

 

But I feel that your best bet would be this one, and in the long run...

 

https://www.teleskop...rd-focuser.html

 

At f/8, it would be quite easy to collimate when needed, and a 6" aperture is bright, and will show you more than you ever dreamed possible.


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#13 SeattleScott

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 12:00 PM

Agreed, the 6” Dob has more magnification for planets and collimation is less sensitive.

Scott
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#14 cookjaiii

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 03:17 PM

Thanks for all the recommendations!

Im from Portugal and in these nights Im able to see both Saturn and Jupiter, but with binoculars I struggle to get a decent view plus I cant really observe the planets, they're just tiny dots.

What I want to is see these planets, rings, and another with some quality, I think with that budget is possible or not?

Definitely!  All the telescopes recommended above will let you see the rings of Saturn and the great red spot of Jupiter.


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#15 Blatzvid

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 03:19 PM

 

But I feel that your best bet would be this one, and in the long run...

 

https://www.teleskop...rd-focuser.html

 

At f/8, it would be quite easy to collimate when needed, and a 6" aperture is bright, and will show you more than you ever dreamed possible.

 

I like that, but in my country it costs 322usd, and it's way more than my budget. I don't even find it on a international market undecided.gif



#16 Sky Muse

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 03:46 PM

I like that, but in my country it costs 322usd, and it's way more than my budget. I don't even find it on a international market undecided.gif

I see...

 

http://site.astrofot...-sw-6-dobson-2/

 

Then, this one would be the runner-up...

 

http://site.astrofot...e/produto/1556/

 

That kit is very popular, and throughout the world.  It's the same kit as the AWB "OneSky".  Here, within this very forum, the Beginners, there's a long-running thread about the "OneSky"...

 

https://www.cloudyni...ithout-borders/



#17 Blatzvid

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 03:57 PM

I see...

 

http://site.astrofot...-sw-6-dobson-2/

 

Then, this one would be the runner-up...

 

http://site.astrofot...e/produto/1556/

 

That kit is very popular, and throughout the world.  It's the same kit as the AWB "OneSky".  Here, within this very forum, the Beginners, there's a long-running thread about the "OneSky"...

 

https://www.cloudyni...ithout-borders/

Here: https://www.astrosho...00-dob/p,45523 

 

Do you think the Heritage I'll be able to see Saturn rings and Jupiter? 



#18 Bowlerhat

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 04:29 PM

Yes, you would be able to see saturn's rings. You can see jupiter too, and it will appear as a disc rather than dots.

 

You can simulate the view here: https://astronomy.to.../field_of_view/


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#19 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 12:52 AM

Here: https://www.astrosho...00-dob/p,45523 

 

Do you think the Heritage I'll be able to see Saturn rings and Jupiter? 

Earlier, after the Sun set and night fell, I observed both Jupiter and Saturn, and with this 5" reflector...

 

finis2b.jpg

 

I then took these afocal shots of both, and with a small(and old) point-and-shoot digital-camera held up to the eyepiece...

 

082319 - Jupiter & Saturn.jpg

 

Are you seeing the rings of Saturn there within that image?  If so, then you'll see the same through the 5" "Heritage".

 

Now, those shots that I took are not very good.  During the live view, with my eye and eyepiece, the two planets were quite sharp, especially Saturn.  You will need a barlow to see them closer, perhaps even a (3x) barlow, and combined with a 12mm(for 4mm - 163x) or 9mm(for 3mm - 216x) eyepiece.  Also, you must learn how to collimate the telescope, and spot on for viewing the planets.

 

A 5" aperture is no slouch under the night sky, not by a long shot.


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#20 Blatzvid

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:40 AM

Earlier, after the Sun set and night fell, I observed both Jupiter and Saturn, and with this 5" reflector...

 

attachicon.gif finis2b.jpg

 

I then took these afocal shots of both, and with a small(and old) point-and-shoot digital-camera held up to the eyepiece...

 

attachicon.gif 082319 - Jupiter & Saturn.jpg

 

Are you seeing the rings of Saturn there within that image?  If so, then you'll see the same through the 5" "Heritage".

 

Now, those shots that I took are not very good.  During the live view, with my eye and eyepiece, the two planets were quite sharp, especially Saturn.  You will need a barlow to see them closer, perhaps even a (3x) barlow, and combined with a 12mm(for 4mm - 163x) or 9mm(for 3mm - 216x) eyepiece.  Also, you must learn how to collimate the telescope, and spot on for viewing the planets.

 

A 5" aperture is no slouch under the night sky, not by a long shot.

 

Thanks for the advise, I'm probably getting it because I can get it around 190usd so I can have a budget to buy a barlow and eyepiece.


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#21 MalVeauX

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:40 AM

Heya,

 

Yes, get a 130mm reflector (the Heritage). It will absolutely reveal a lot and you will easily see the rings of Saturn and the bands and great spot on Jupiter and their moons.

 

I can see these things with an 80mm aperture. You will easily see them without much effort with a 130mm aperture and the view will stay brighter as you increase magnification. 100x magnification is all it takes and you'll see those things.

 

Good all around telescope for visual!

 

Very best,


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#22 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 11:03 AM

Thanks for the advise, I'm probably getting it because I can get it around 190usd so I can have a budget to buy a barlow and eyepiece.

It just occurred to me.  If you're wanting a smaller telescope in order to have funds left over for extra eyepieces and accessories, I would urge you to get the 6" f/8 Newtonian-Dobson instead, and get the extras as time goes by.  In the long run, that would be best to do.  The telescope would be brighter, easier to collimate, and easier to reach the higher powers for the Moon, the planets and the double-stars; and for quite a few deep-sky objects as well.


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#23 Blatzvid

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:37 PM

It just occurred to me.  If you're wanting a smaller telescope in order to have funds left over for extra eyepieces and accessories, I would urge you to get the 6" f/8 Newtonian-Dobson instead, and get the extras as time goes by.  In the long run, that would be best to do.  The telescope would be brighter, easier to collimate, and easier to reach the higher powers for the Moon, the planets and the double-stars; and for quite a few deep-sky objects as well.

Ops, I just got the heritage crazy.gif


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#24 Don H

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:53 PM

Even though you ordered a Heritage, you might consider the Z130. If you can cancel your order before it ships, some of the advatages of the Z130 are a 4 vane spider for the secondary, a solid tube for the OTA,  and a better focuser. I think they may be close in price...

 

https://zhumell.com/...ector-telescope


Edited by Don H, 24 August 2019 - 03:54 PM.

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#25 Sky Muse

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:56 PM

Ops, I just got the heritage crazy.gif

It was written in the stars long ago. shocked.gif  


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