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Cleaning an Eye Piece

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#1 patindaytona

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:17 AM

I have some cleaning solution that i use for cleaning my DSLR camera lens'

Is that good also for eye pieces? Just want to be sure!



#2 tncreame

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:21 AM

Go to the Televue page to read what Al Nagler says about cleaning his EPs. In short, he says the coatings are durable and recommends using reagent-grade (pure) acetone. I found it at a chain drug store with the other nailpolish remover, followed his advice and my EPs are outstandingly clean. 



#3 sg6

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:32 AM

Eyepieces are quite tough. I clean mine, well the outer surfaces reasonably often.

OK, lazy whatsit and I have a habit of standing the expendable one on a table and the have dust drop on them. So I have no real option.

 

I use cotton buds. Don't dig the edges too hard, that has a habit of releasing more crud that needs cleaning off. So more work.

 

Almost impossible to get them initially smear free (sdvertising on evey fluid says otherwise, and they all lie). I end up sort of polishing with a dry bud or microfibre cloth.

 

One serious bit of advice - just clean the outer surfaces. Taking one apart to do the inner ones is generally not a great idea.



#4 patindaytona

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 10:41 AM

Taking them apart........I'm way ahead of you.

Also with buds, you can get those tiny fibers caught at the edges.



#5 nicoledoula

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:02 AM

Keep EP's covered when not in use and use an air bulb before putting away.. Coatings aren't as tough as they say.


Edited by nicoledoula, 23 August 2019 - 11:02 AM.

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#6 patindaytona

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:05 AM

Ok Nicol.

With the new 2" 24mm 80 degree you put your eye right up against the glass. That's an expensive eye piece! I will have to be really careful with that one. I'm sure my glass cleaner is ok with it. It's made for optics on the DSLR cameras.

What i do with them and would be good for the eye pieces too is to break off the bud at end of Q-tip and put a few drops onto the microfiber then extend the broken q-tip into that and get the edges good.


Edited by patindaytona, 23 August 2019 - 11:06 AM.


#7 Mike G.

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 11:21 AM

regarding acetone - be careful buying from drug stores. the acetone you find there (typically called nail polish removed) usually has added chemicals - fragrances, oils the keep your skin from drying out, etc.  make sure the acetone you buy is pure acetone.  myself, I use 91% alcohol and q-tips (after blowing the surface off first)



#8 Starman1

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 12:30 PM

I used pure isopropyl alcohol for years, but it does a poor job removing organic débris.

Acetone is stronger, but evaporates a bit too fast and it dissolves plastic and rubber so a great amount of care has to be utilized.  And it's not good to breathe it, either.

So I discovered that commercial lens cleaning fluids were better (Nikon, Zeiss, etc.).

Finally, I discovered ROR, which cleans more effectively than any other cleaner I've ever used.

It contains IPA, water, ammonia (trace), salt, and a trace of soap.  It could clean off mascara left by visitors during outreach in just one pass.

 

I use Q-tip swabs because they avoid accidentally getting fluid under the lenses.

I drop a couple drops of ROR on a q-tip and make a spiral pass on the lens, starting in the center and going out toward the edge, wetting the lens, but not a pool of fluid on the lens.

NEVER rub a dry q-tip on a dry lens, as this can scratch the lens, unless the lens is completely clean and free of all particles.

I then quickly flip the q-tip over and do another spiral pass to mop up the residuum.

Before it is dry, I grab a second q-tip and wipe from edge to just past the center while rotating the eyepiece under the movement.

This pass resembles a spirograph pattern: https://www.vectorst...vector-22573239

As I do this, I notice he fluid disappears, any haze disappears, and the lens really looks very clean.

 

One thing I note is that once the lens is very very clean, any resistance to the passage of the q-tip on the lens seems to disappear, almost as if

the lens has become teflon-coated.  A bright LED flashlight, held at low angles, shows the lens completely clean, sometimes cleaner than it came out of the box when new.

[I could tell you some horror stories there.]

 

Of course, this might leave a small cotton strand or two on the eyepiece, so the final step is always to use a small bulb to blow these pieces off the lens.

 

The same technique of doing the final clean up with the 2nd q-tip could be done with a clean microfiber cloth if you prefer.  And Kim-wipes can do a decent job of cleaning if the lens is relatively

clean to begin with.  There are many ways to accomplish the same goal.  For me, though, ROR and q-tips is my go-to technique.


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#9 rkelley8493

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 12:47 PM

I use Zeiss Lens Cleaner. You can purchase a kit from Amazon for less than $20. I've had it for about 4 years and have only refilled the spray bottle once. I've found it works very well for cleaning my SCT corrector plate.

 

 

zeiss.jpg

 


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#10 MartinPond

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:19 PM

The Zeiss lens cleaner and others like it are

   a trace of detergent and a littl isopropyl in water.

Very good...if the residue is light.

 

 

I use Windex, then lighter-fluid.

The lighter fluid is completely residue free,

less noxious and volatile than acetone.,

and is the best way to remove greasy things.

You can still find it at camping and drugstores.

The ammonia in the Windex helps to remove

proteins, like skin and tear-crust.

 

Acetone can still be used for glue or varnishy residue.

Acetone is more agressive against the Canada Balsam in many doublets..

...so make it quick.

 

ROR lens cleaner is a bit more aggressive than the Zeiss,

is a little alkaline, and can handle oily/greasy stuff to some extent.


Edited by MartinPond, 23 August 2019 - 09:30 PM.

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#11 Heywood

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:53 PM

Can a Tele Vue eyepiece be returned to Tele Vue for cleaning (for a fee, of course)?

 

Thank you!

 

Heywood



#12 REC

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 10:36 AM

I use Zeiss Lens Cleaner. You can purchase a kit from Amazon for less than $20. I've had it for about 4 years and have only refilled the spray bottle once. I've found it works very well for cleaning my SCT corrector plate.

 

 

attachicon.gif zeiss.jpg

I have some tiny specs on my corrector plate, maybe dried dew pollen, will it get that off too? I sure would like to get the plate new looking again.


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#13 REC

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 10:37 AM



I used pure isopropyl alcohol for years, but it does a poor job removing organic débris.

Acetone is stronger, but evaporates a bit too fast and it dissolves plastic and rubber so a great amount of care has to be utilized.  And it's not good to breathe it, either.

So I discovered that commercial lens cleaning fluids were better (Nikon, Zeiss, etc.).

Finally, I discovered ROR, which cleans more effectively than any other cleaner I've ever used.

It contains IPA, water, ammonia (trace), salt, and a trace of soap.  It could clean off mascara left by visitors during outreach in just one pass.

 

I use Q-tip swabs because they avoid accidentally getting fluid under the lenses.

I drop a couple drops of ROR on a q-tip and make a spiral pass on the lens, starting in the center and going out toward the edge, wetting the lens, but not a pool of fluid on the lens.

NEVER rub a dry q-tip on a dry lens, as this can scratch the lens, unless the lens is completely clean and free of all particles.

I then quickly flip the q-tip over and do another spiral pass to mop up the residuum.

Before it is dry, I grab a second q-tip and wipe from edge to just past the center while rotating the eyepiece under the movement.

This pass resembles a spirograph pattern: https://www.vectorst...vector-22573239

As I do this, I notice he fluid disappears, any haze disappears, and the lens really looks very clean.

 

One thing I note is that once the lens is very very clean, any resistance to the passage of the q-tip on the lens seems to disappear, almost as if

the lens has become teflon-coated.  A bright LED flashlight, held at low angles, shows the lens completely clean, sometimes cleaner than it came out of the box when new.

[I could tell you some horror stories there.]

 

Of course, this might leave a small cotton strand or two on the eyepiece, so the final step is always to use a small bulb to blow these pieces off the lens.

 

The same technique of doing the final clean up with the 2nd q-tip could be done with a clean microfiber cloth if you prefer.  And Kim-wipes can do a decent job of cleaning if the lens is relatively

clean to begin with.  There are many ways to accomplish the same goal.  For me, though, ROR and q-tips is my go-to technique.

What is ROR?



#14 Albie

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 10:40 AM

ROR    residual oil remover .



#15 Albie

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 10:45 AM

I use ROR to clean my ep's and sometimes my binoculars although you can go through a bottle pretty quick using it on the bins. Wonderful stuff although can be considered a bit pricey for an ep cleaner .  You can find ROR at some of your local camera/binocular  stores. You can also find it on Amazon . 

 

 

 

Edit : added "can"   to "you can go through..."


Edited by Albie, 24 August 2019 - 03:30 PM.


#16 Starman1

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 02:53 PM

For cleaning eyepieces, if you do as I discussed, 1 small bottle will clean easily 100 eyepieces or more.

My eyepieces are all 5 years or more older, yet I am still on the first bottle.

I only used it once to clean the 4" objective in my refractor and the scope hasn't needed it since.

Many retailers sell ROR, too.  Do a Google Search for "ROR eyepiece cleaner".

 

When I first encountered it when working in a store that sold binoculars, one 1-oz bottle would clean 200-300 pairs of binoculars easy.

It only takes 2 drops on a q-tip.



#17 Albie

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:31 PM

Actually my first 2oz bottle is at least 8 years old and may have another year or two of use left .  That's not bad in my books.

 

My 15x70's get more than a few drops used to clean them but for as often as I clean them that's not too concerning . Still worth the cost of admission imo for a superior clean.


Edited by Albie, 24 August 2019 - 03:31 PM.


#18 rkelley8493

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:41 PM

I have some tiny specs on my corrector plate, maybe dried dew pollen, will it get that off too? I sure would like to get the plate new looking again.

It should. That was the main thing on my corrector plate, along with some dust and water spots from condensation. Just make sure to use an air duster to get off the particles that aren't stuck to the plate.

I didn't take a "Before" photo, but here us the "After":

 

lx90clean.jpg


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#19 Starman1

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:58 PM

Every few years, you need to clean off the haze on the inside of the corrector:

--angle the scope up at a 45° angle

--remove the pressure ring with the writing on it.

--note the position of any spacers around the edge of the corrector.  They may fall out and need to be put back there.  Approximately is good enough.

--use a Sharpie and mark the edge of the glass and the aluminum cell beside it so the rotation of the corrector is identical when it is put back in.

--grab the center by the rim of the secondary holder and pull the corrector out of the tube with the secondary attached,  Reach around and grab the baffle on the secondary so you have two hands holding the corrector.

--flip it around backwards and reinstall it in the tube.

--clean the inside just like you did the outside.  Blow the dust off the secondary mirror.

--flip it around and reinstall it, lining up the marks on the edge and making sure the spacers are about where they were.

--replace the pressure ring with writing and tighten the screws only finger tight (for a hex wrench, turn the short end and use the long end in the screw). 

You want them *just* holding the glass, not exerting a lot of pressure on it.

 

It took almost as long for me to write that as it takes to do.

When I did that on my 8" SCT, every time it looked like the corrector plate simply disappeared because it was so clean.

But, after about 3 years, a haze built up on the inside again and another cleaning was necessary.

As easy as cleaning an eyepiece once the glass faces you.


Edited by Starman1, 24 August 2019 - 03:59 PM.

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#20 MartinPond

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 05:03 PM

It should be mentioned..

that I salvage binocular eyepieces with massive amounts

  of grease on the outside....thus the "high molarity"

  of the lighter fluid (naptha)..

 

 

For almost everyone with a little oily film,

  or everyday use,  ROR

  is an awesome way to avoid cleaning over and over

  without eating plastic, rubber, paint, and your flesh

(de-greases skin without gloves)  with acetone.

   To eat proteins without acetone...a bit of Windex,

   then ROR...


Edited by MartinPond, 24 August 2019 - 05:05 PM.


#21 REC

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:30 AM

It should. That was the main thing on my corrector plate, along with some dust and water spots from condensation. Just make sure to use an air duster to get off the particles that aren't stuck to the plate.

I didn't take a "Before" photo, but here us the "After":

 

attachicon.gif lx90clean.jpg

Thanks!


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#22 sjc327

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 12:08 PM

Can a Tele Vue eyepiece be returned to Tele Vue for cleaning (for a fee, of course)?

 

Thank you!

 

Heywood

Yes it can. For a $20 fee Tele Vue will test and clean (outside glass only) any of their eyepieces. You would have to pay extra for shipping costs. I live close by so I just dropped them off. I did this with two used TV eyepieces I recently purchased. 

 

They also told me if you wanted all glass surfaces cleaned it would be l believe $75 since that would involve taking it apart.

 

Since I live close by it was worth $20 for them to test and clean a used eyepiece for my own piece of mind.

 

However if you factor in shipping both ways then it might make it a tougher choice. I did it more for the "test" rather than the "cleaning". They put it in their test scope run certain checks.




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