Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

First Observation report with Telementor II - A personal experience

classic refractor observing report equipment
  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:39 PM

Hi Forum,

 

Inspired by the comments of skilled observers and fans of this iconic model, last week, i had the opportunity to acquire a second hand Carl Zeiss Jena Telementor II from a gentleman in Germany, Since I observed through the Astrojensen´s Telemator one year ago in a starparty and was impressed by the telescope, and being vintage Zeiss enthusiast, i decided to get one at some point of my life.

 

The Telementor thread shows some of the background and inspiration as well as the unnoficial "first light" short report.

 

https://www.cloudyni...ntor-ii-owners/

 

This time I would like to share the first extended observing session.

 

Location: a dark playground surrounded by trees and apartment blocks, clear views to north and south, East and west clear above 35 degrees

Start local time: 22:30  / End: 00:30

Temp. 16 degrees Celsius with no wind.

Equipment: Telementor 2, (cheap) Amici prism 45 deg, ES 2468, Baader Hyperion 13 mm, Zeiss H-25, GSO 2x Barlow, Zeiss Notarem 10x40

 

I prepare the observation dismantling the Telementor and placing the mount, counterweight in a backpack and the OTA in a tripod bag. but it was too short. I left the apartment with the OTA in one hand, and the folded tripod in the other. the tray was in a small bag. I must say that transporting all the setup in one trip is difficult but not impossible.

 

I set the scope and started the observation:

 

Jupiter:  I started with the H-25 and it was very clear and sharp. i did not expect that performance from a Huygens EP. the disc of Jupiter had no noticeable color and the four satellites were clearly identified. I changed to the ES2468 and i noticed that i liked more the H-25 view.  with the 13 mm (64x) the bands of Jupiter appeared in the view. The planet was still sharp and even better than the Mak 90!!!  At 120x, the view was a little bit dimmer, but the bands were more contrasted.

 

Excited by the Jupiter view, i moved to Saturn

 

Saturn:  Wow.... at 64x, the planet offered a extremely pleasant view, well defined, and probably the sharpest Saturn that i have seen in the last years.  I decided to use the Baader Zoom but i did not find it!, so i left the Telementor alone and i run to my house to collect it.  Now back at the scope, i used aprox. 100x (Zoom + barlow) and this is probably the best practical view with the local conditions (Saturn is very low and the atmosphere is playing its role)

 

Satisfied by the planetary views, i decided to challenge the scope to DSO´s. I have read several times that this is not the strenght of this scope, but i gave a try.

 

First of all, i realized that, without finder, the peep holes are not precisely useful, so I placed the ES 2468 and started navigating the sky. It was almost a coincidence that, when I was looking for the Omega Nebula (via starhopping in alt-az mode) i located my very first DSO with this Telementor: the open cluster IC 4665,  a typical binocular target, but nicely enhanced by the telescope: stars really crisp, a very aesthetic view and it motivated me to challenge the scope with other objects:

 

Using only the ES2468 (35x), my next target was M13. the Globular appeared magnificent in the view, the contrast was very good and the view was better than my memories observing with my -gone- Baader Scopos 80 mm. At this point i was really thinking if this was the performance that the Telementor owners praised: the Telementor II performs as a bigger aperture telescope.

 

The next target was M57.  the ring nebula was perceived as a defocused star at 35x and better defined at 64x with hints of the ring shape.  How can this be possible with a 63mm achromatic?

 

Cygnus was blocked by a big tree, but looking above the apartment roofs i saw Andromeda so, now more familiarized with the controls of the mount, i felt more confident to point without the peep holes or any finder.

 

Found M31 very fast... again, M31 was nice, extending its shape in the field, I know the Telementor is not intended for galaxies, but i liked what i saw. M32 was visible too. I did not search for M110.   Just some degrees below, i found Mirach. Nice color. This scope excels at the colors in my opinion.

 

Panning around Andromeda i found the Double Cluster, Beautifully framed in the field, with multiple stars. The sharpness of the Telementor surpases the performance of my (mass produced) 4 inch refractor, making easier to detect the individual stars in the cluster.

 

I decided to do a Tour in Cassiopea and the views did not disappoint me: the Owl cluster was very well defined, and i must admit that i never understood why it was also named the ET cluster. NOW, I know why. grin.gif

 

I observed few other DSO´s in Cas: NGC 663, NGC 559, M103,  and with more confidence, i hunted WZ Cas.  With the Zoom i was able to see the components and its colors!

 

Cygnus was finally unnobstructed so, i pointed to Albireo. nice, wonderful pair. It does not need more magnification. at 35x its perfect!,  In the vicinity i observed M56 and again, i asked myself how the Dumbell would look like. well, it was not hard to find it. at 35x the shape was obvious and at 64x was better.  The surprises continued!

 

Now i asked myself... Would it be possible to detect M51?  Yes it was. Of course not the shape, but the fuzzy patch was obvious. Probably with better conditions (higher altitude) i can see more, but i was happy to see it with the 63 mm.

 

M81 and M82 were not a problem. but then i saw a fast thick cloud covering the sky...  the conditions deteriorated, so i decided to close the session.

 

What did i learn from this "first" session with the Telementor II?

 

It is a very capable scope, performing beyond its specifications. I can not believe it was "just" another 63 mm.  The views are really sharp to the edge. My Baader Hyperion had some issues with my former 80 mm f/6, but with the Telementor II I placed Saturn at the edges and i saw no distortion. I saw open clusters as never before in similar apertures: minimal light scattering despite the cheap amici,  Galaxies and nebulas were identified and the view did not disappointed me.

 

I ended using in most of the cases the Explore Scientific 24 68. I did not feel the need to use the 32 mm.

 

The amici prism that i used was not optimal. i need to get the 90 degree version for more comfort. To be a cheap amici, my 45 deg. prism from Skywatcher did not show the line unless i defocused planets or stars.

 

It is a pleasure to operate this mount, it is very precise and the controls are simple and intuitive. It is relatively light and matches perfectly the OTA when used either in Equatorial or Alt-Az mode.

 

In the subjective side of my review i could comment that beyond the initial frustration because lack of a "standard" finderscope, there was a quick learning curve and the initial disadvantage suddenly became a re-encounter with the starhopping and the visual tools and techniques.

 

This scope made me adjust my expectations, it is not to see "bigger" but to see "better", through the improvement of the observing skills. In the ca. 2 hours of observation, the scope pushed me to challenge myself and that is the best outcome. I expect to get more from this scope in the future!

 

Thanks for reading!!

 

20190820_221008.gif

 

Clear Skies

Carlos


Edited by Corcaroli78, 25 August 2019 - 02:11 PM.

  • davidmcgo, Mr Magoo, Mak2007 and 19 others like this

#2 JamesMStephens

JamesMStephens

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 647
  • Joined: 25 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Posted 24 August 2019 - 03:52 PM

Dear Carlos,

What a nice report.  You mention that Saturn was as clear as you've seen it in several years.  Saturn isn't very high at its highest this apparition, and you're 24-degrees farther north than I am.  I enjoy observing the planets.  Do you think they are less popular targets for observers at your latitude?

 

Jim



#3 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 24 August 2019 - 06:26 PM

Dear Carlos,

What a nice report.  You mention that Saturn was as clear as you've seen it in several years.  Saturn isn't very high at its highest this apparition, and you're 24-degrees farther north than I am.  I enjoy observing the planets.  Do you think they are less popular targets for observers at your latitude?

 

Jim

Hi Jim

 

I think that planetary observation -especially Saturn and Jupiter- is very popular, but at this latitude, the planets are too low now and that it is not optimal due to the atmospheric conditions (which can change in minutes !) . Yesterday I had what I consider one of the best nights ever in my time in Denmark, transparency was good (after a rainy day), then cleared, and there was no wind.  Temperaure was very pleasant improving the observation comfort. It was a good combination of weather and optics.

 

But if i compare these conditions with the time i lived in Mexico with dry conditions and at 2500 m over sea level, with Saturn or Jupiter at 50 degrees altitude, of course that is a big difference even using a average affordable telescope (in my case a 76 mm f/9 reflector when i started the hobby)

 

Carlos

 

 

 

 


  • terraclarke and JamesMStephens like this

#4 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12119
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 24 August 2019 - 06:56 PM

Very, very nice first light report! Sounds like you're truly and well bitten by the Zeiss Telementor bug. grin.gif

 

And rest assured that under a dark sky, such as at Kompedal, it can show much, MUCH more deep-sky. You've just barely scratched the surface of what it can do. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


  • Corcaroli78 likes this

#5 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 24 August 2019 - 07:48 PM

Very, very nice first light report! Sounds like you're truly and well bitten by the Zeiss Telementor bug. grin.gif

 

And rest assured that under a dark sky, such as at Kompedal, it can show much, MUCH more deep-sky. You've just barely scratched the surface of what it can do. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

Thanks Thomas,,

 

I must admit you "exposed" me to the Telementor bug laugh.gif  and I thank you for have done that. (and Allan for showing me the APQ on the 1b, but that bug is really beyond my plans shocked.gif )

 

I just came from a session with the 4 inch refractor under a similar sky conditions (very rare here in Vejle), and yes, i can see more stars in the field, but the view is more contrasted and crisp in the Telementor with no detectable color in bright stars like Vega . They complement very well each other in my equipment list.

 

The Telementor EASILY outperformed my former 80 mm and the ETX90 in DSO´s, AND surpasses in ease of use my AZ-GTI alt-az mount which probably must go now and be replaced by a small non goto mount. It is also potentially leaving the ETX90 jobless in planetary (still pending to use the Telementor in solar and Lunar)

 

As i mentioned several times in my report, i think there is still room for optical improvement: i need to find a diagonal, but not sure what is the best compromise: standard diagonal mirror, diagonal prism or Amici prism.

 

Another optimization to be adressed is the transportation issue. I need to find how to move it safely because the experience was not so nice where i live. I have seen some wooden "coffins" that keep the mount, tripod and OTA protected, or a big tripod bag or ilumination equipment padded bag.

 

I was told that even the Telementor can not go against the law of physics (and 63mm is at the end just 63mm), but certainly challenges them, hard to believe !!

 

Well, i am really happy to confirm, that the Telementor is VERY capable on DSO's keeping the right expectations, and yes, it must go to Kompedal !!

 

Carlos


  • Astrojensen, steve t, terraclarke and 2 others like this

#6 agmoonsolns

agmoonsolns

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1543
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018
  • Loc: Washington

Posted 24 August 2019 - 10:30 PM

Rifle totes work great for these scopes. You can get a hard-sided case or a soft-sided padded case/bag/tote with zippered, padded compartments inside and they are much lighter, less expensive, and have all kinds of straps for carrying (I like the over-the-shoulder carrying straps). You can find some really nice ones on ebay for not too much money too.


Edited by agmoonsolns, 24 August 2019 - 10:31 PM.

  • Corcaroli78 likes this

#7 Steve Allison

Steve Allison

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 974
  • Joined: 25 Nov 2016
  • Loc: Olympia, Wash. 98502

Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:06 AM

[....]

 

I was told that even the Telementor can not go against the law of physics (and 63mm is at the end just 63mm), but certainly challenges them, hard to believe !!

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     [....]

It's not that your Zeiss can go against the laws of physics, but rather that it can go as far as the laws of physics allow.

 

A lot of telescopes can't, as you are finding out.


  • Astrojensen, Corcaroli78, shaesavage and 2 others like this

#8 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 25 August 2019 - 08:08 AM

Rifle totes work great for these scopes. You can get a hard-sided case or a soft-sided padded case/bag/tote with zippered, padded compartments inside and they are much lighter, less expensive, and have all kinds of straps for carrying (I like the over-the-shoulder carrying straps). You can find some really nice ones on ebay for not too much money too.

Many thanks agmoonsolns!

 

I never considered rifle carry bags, but i can see they are a good option, better than the tripod bags which are not well padded.

 

i will see if i can fit the entire scope in one bag. i am looking at this at the moment:. 

 

https://www.ebay.com...c7ad7956c695645

 

Carlos



#9 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12119
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 25 August 2019 - 08:31 AM

 

i will see if i can fit the entire scope in one bag. i am looking at this at the moment:

The bag you linked to is too short to fit the tripod inside. The tripod is 112cm long, including the spigot. The rest should fit inside nicely. You can wrap the mount in a blanket or a towel, so it doesn't scratch the scope. 

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


Edited by Astrojensen, 25 August 2019 - 08:31 AM.

  • Corcaroli78 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: classic, refractor, observing report, equipment



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics