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High ISO imaging

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#1 Jeffmar

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 01:55 PM

A few nights ago I was far away from city lights looking at stars and taking photos. I had my C11 and a Sony A7RIII camera with a .7 reducer. I usually start out the night by doing eyepiece viewing for an hour or so to let optics stabilize and to wait for darker skies. When I do astro photos I often take very high ISO, short exposure, photos to center the image and adjust focus. After I got home and was looking through my files I noticed my single 40,000 ISO, 5 second, exposures looked better than my stacked 1600 and 3200 ISO photos. After cleaning up my images in Lightroom the high ISO images still looked better so I deleted most of my stacked photos to clear some memory. I was surprised at the results I got. I have read several articles about high ISO photos sometimes having less noise, depending on the camera, but losing out on dynamic range. I am going to start experimenting with higher ISO, sort duration photos more often to see what I can get. It might work well in my light polluted neighborhood where I can't take photos for longer than 60 seconds, even with a light pollution filter.

 
DSC05649

 

Single frame

40,000 ISO

5 second exposure


Edited by Jeffmar, 25 August 2019 - 02:14 PM.

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#2 SandyHouTex

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 02:15 PM

A few nights ago I was far away from city lights looking at stars and taking photos. I had my C11 and a Sony A7RIII camera with a .7 reducer. I usually start out the night by doing eyepiece viewing for an hour or so to let optics stabilize and to wait for darker skies. When I do astro photos I often take very high ISO, short exposure, photos to center the image and adjust focus. After I got home and was looking through my files I noticed my single 40,000 ISO, 5 second, exposures looked better than my stacked 1600 and 3200 ISO photos. After cleaning up my images in Lightroom the high ISO images still looked better so I deleted most of my stacked photos to clear some memory. I was surprised at the results I got. I have read several articles about high ISO photos sometimes having less noise, depending on the camera, but losing out on dynamic range. I am going to start experimenting with higher ISO, sort duration photos more often to see what I can get. It might work well in my light polluted neighborhood where I can't take photos for longer than 60 seconds, even with a light pollution filter.

 
 

 

Single frame

40,000 ISO

5 second exposure

That’s a pretty nice pic.


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#3 Jeffmar

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 02:28 PM

That’s a pretty nice pic.

Thanks Sandy!



#4 Sam Danigelis

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 08:25 PM

With star clusters (which have little color compared to Nebulas, for instance), maybe dynamic range isn't so much of an issue. I'd had some similar results before, but once I tweaked things more in post processing, the stacked image was far superior. But that was with M27, which has some color.

#5 17.5Dob

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 08:44 PM

With star clusters (which have little color compared to Nebulas, for instance), maybe dynamic range isn't so much of an issue. I'd had some similar results before, but once I tweaked things more in post processing, the stacked image was far superior. But that was with M27, which has some color.

Star clusters have enormous variations in star colors and benefit the most from low ISO's/ huge DR.

ISO 200

33541740568_b8cb1ec05e_b.jpg


33675909328_009b4076da_b.jpg


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#6 Jeffmar

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 11:18 PM

Star clusters have enormous variations in star colors and benefit the most from low ISO's/ huge DR.

ISO 200

33541740568_b8cb1ec05e_b.jpg


33675909328_009b4076da_b.jpg

These are beautiful photos! I especially like m13. I have always wondered what m13 would look like if we were only a few hundred lightyears away from it rather than 22,000. Would it look nearly as saturated as a lot of m13 photos we see? Your photo seems to have more depth and realism to me than photos I have seen from Hubble for instance, not that I know exactly what realistic looks like.

 

You also have amazing color in the Pleiades photo. Nice work.



#7 Jeffmar

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 01:41 AM

With star clusters (which have little color compared to Nebulas, for instance), maybe dynamic range isn't so much of an issue. I'd had some similar results before, but once I tweaked things more in post processing, the stacked image was far superior. But that was with M27, which has some color

I didn't think I had discovered a faster and simpler way to get the best images. I was surprised my high ISO photos were better than my stacked, lower ISO, photos were. Quirky. right? 

 

48441325481 0d142347ab O

 

This was from a few nights before and my stacked result was way better than any single photo, high ISO or not.



#8 Sam Danigelis

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 01:50 AM

17.5Dob, I'll have to admit you've got some beautiful color going on in those shots. You've proven your point well. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.


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