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When will planets by high again? (N. hemisphere)

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15 replies to this topic

#1 Deep13

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 04:23 PM

Well, the topic title is pretty much the whole question. Jupiter and Saturn, but also Mars and Uranus are really low in the sky recently. When will they be higher for the northern hemisphere?

#2 Neptune

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 04:38 PM

Wouldn't it be very close to 1/2 their orbital period? Also dependent on earth's seasonal position for that time period.


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#3 clusterbuster

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 04:51 PM

My guess is about 6 years for JUPITER and 15 years for SATURN.

Just guessing without looking up any facts.

 Mark



#4 Bean614

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 05:05 PM

My guess is about 6 years for JUPITER and 15 years for SATURN.

Just guessing without looking up any facts.

 Mark

"Just guessing without looking up any facts."....????

 

Then why post anything at all????


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#5 barbarosa

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 05:16 PM

Who needs facts or calculations? Run Stellarium or some other free planetarium program forward at speeds approaching the movie version of The Time Machine.

 

On this date in 2025, assuming quite a lot, Saturn be about 50 degrees above my the west coast at San Francisco. Hot tip- you can enter the date and time or watch the sky wiz past.


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#6 DLuders

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 05:17 PM

Well, by looking at a Planisphere, one can see that (for Northern Hemisphere observers) the Ecliptic is highest at the "toe" of the constellation Gemini.  Using the free planetarium program http://stellarium.org , one can see that Jupiter is favorably placed (high in the south) in January 2025.   fingertap.gif    Mars is high too, a bit to the east of Jupiter.



#7 ShaulaB

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 05:17 PM

Do you have an app on your phone or tablet? Sky Safari lets me set a date and see.

 

If you have Stellarium or the Starry Night software, on a laptop or tower, you can run time forward to see when planets will be higher. Watch the ecliptic.



#8 Special Ed

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 05:27 PM

Mars will be fairly high next apparition as will Uranus.  Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune will take a few more years.


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#9 Jim Davis

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 05:53 PM

I can't wait for the 12/21/2020 Grand Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn.


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#10 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 06:32 PM

The two planets won't be very high in the sky during the Grand Conjunction but it will be something otherwise.

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#11 mashirts

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 06:39 PM

October 6 2020 Mars will be at it's closest again. -2.3 abouts magnitude. Around 65 degrees in altitude at around 2 am ish. Sounds like the next best planet view time frame.
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#12 kathyastro

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 06:44 PM

"Just guessing without looking up any facts."....????

 

Then why post anything at all????

Because the poster answered based on knowledge of the solar system.  In half an orbit from now, the planets will be high.  Half an orbit for Jupiter is 6 years.  Half an orbit for Saturn is 15 years.  That was probably the most informative post in this thread.


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#13 CeleNoptic

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 06:44 PM

In Ohio Jupiter will rise above 30* in August, 2021, Saturn a year later, in August 2022.


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#14 fcathell

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 10:50 PM

Clusterbuster's answer was pretty accurate as KathyAstro deducted. It wasn't a "guess".

 

FC



#15 Jaimo!

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 11:08 PM

"Just guessing without looking up any facts."....????

 

Then why post anything at all????

Because he knows enough and has enough experience to make a rough estimation...  Knowledge is power.



#16 Redbetter

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Posted 30 August 2019 - 04:30 AM

Uhhh...nobody noted this, but Uranus is rather well placed for northern hemisphere observers, roughly 13 deg. dec, which is better than Neptune at ~ -6 deg declination (and yet still reaches a fairly respectable elevation for us.)  Uranus is only low if you don't stay out late/early enough for it to work its way higher into the sky.

 

Now, if you have dark skies and want to have a little bit of fun...you might notice that Uranus and Neptune are within the zodiacal band (which traces the ecliptic) stretching from the morning zodiacal light toward the gegenschein.  Uranus is visible naked eye, and knowing the general location I can pick it out from other mag ~6 stars based on its position relative to the ecliptic.  I have hit it on the first try this past two months with only a rough idea of where it would be along the ecliptic.   

 

Neptune is somewhat more difficult as it is dimmer and has been wandering slowly in a section of moderate naked eye stars in Aquarius (96 and 90 phi-Aquarii.)  But a low power search with an ST80, and having some feel for the magnitudes will quickly allow me to choose the right ~8 mag "star" to view in the main scope.  If I don't see the little disc at high power on the first try, I go to another.  Checking against something like Uranometria will help reveal which candidate is not in the pattern.  Or you can cheat a little and plot the planet in a paper atlas using some coordinates from S&T, and do the same check against the finder. 


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