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Andromeda Galaxy

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#1 WGAS

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:18 PM

Total newbie here and having a blast with 12x50 and 10x40 binoculars. Is it possible to see the Andromeda Galaxy with 12x50 binoculars? Looking in the northwest sky during early morning hours, I spotted a very faint “dust cloud” about the size of a dime through the binoculars and was wondering if that is Andromeda Galaxy?
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#2 S.Boerner

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:39 PM

Yes it is possible but much better if the sky is dark.  I was at Bryce Canyon once with 11x80s and M31 was HUGE.


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#3 frankmorgan

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:41 PM

Andomeda, "seeing a candle through  horn " I love this celestial object.I use 7x,mostly,wider the feild the better. Its our neighbour and takes 2000 years to say hi ! Clear Skies ,Frank



#4 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:44 PM

Andromeda is easily seen in most any binoculars.

 

What it looks like depends on the amount of light pollution. Under a light polluted sky, you see just the round core. Under dark skies you see most of the galaxy, elongated and filling a good part of the field.

 

I locate Andromeda by starting at Mirach, a yellow mag 2.1 star. I follow up in an arc to mu and nu Andromedae. The galaxy is near nu.

 

Jon


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#5 bobzeq25

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:46 PM

Total newbie here and having a blast with 12x50 and 10x40 binoculars. Is it possible to see the Andromeda Galaxy with 12x50 binoculars? Looking in the northwest sky during early morning hours, I spotted a very faint “dust cloud” about the size of a dime through the binoculars and was wondering if that is Andromeda Galaxy?

Yep.  The best way to verify it is by looking at the stars in the field.  They're very distinctive.

 

http://stars.astro.i.../sow/m31-t.html


Edited by bobzeq25, 25 August 2019 - 09:50 PM.

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#6 hallelujah

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:53 PM

https://earthsky.org/?p=3659



#7 Knasal

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 09:54 PM

Andromeda is easily seen in most any binoculars.

 

What it looks like depends on the amount of light pollution. 

I’d add that it’s also visible naked eye depending on light pollution... but it sounds like you got it with your binoculars!

 

Kevin


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#8 vdog

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:10 PM

It's pretty easy for me to find in my 10x50s, but it looks better in the 20x80s.  

 

Your description of it sounds about right.



#9 havasman

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Posted 25 August 2019 - 10:46 PM

From a decent dark site Andromeda's a fairly easy naked eye object. So its easy with binoculars.



#10 lestrade

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 01:57 AM

Andomeda, "seeing a candle through  horn " I love this celestial object.I use 7x,mostly,wider the feild the better. Its our neighbour and takes 2000 years to say hi ! Clear Skies ,Frank

Our "neighbour" takes a "bit" more "to say hi". ;-)
2,5 million years.

CS,
Herbert

 



#11 sg6

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 04:43 AM

Andromeda is easiest seen in binoculars, once you realise that the faint grey patch is the Andromeda galaxy.

 

As it is big, 3+ degrees across, you need a something wide and binoculars suit very well. Especially if you want to have a bit of "dark" framing it. I use everyday 8x42's, although the ETX-70 does a good job with a 25 or 20mm eypiece in it. And it tracks waytogo.gif



#12 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 04:57 AM

I find that 15x70s are about right for Andromeda, they're 4.4 degree field is sufficient for framing and the greater size is a plus.

 

Jon



#13 WGAS

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 07:21 AM

Thank you, all!! Appreciate the feedback. Looking forward to clear nights.
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#14 Mr. Bill

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Posted 26 August 2019 - 09:48 AM

Best view ever for me was at 9000 ft in Bortle 1/2 skies with my Fuji 25x150.....you could make out the "potato chip" extreme edges of the disk that is shown in long exposure images but rarely seen visually; a view never to be forgotten although 15 years ago.


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#15 Mad Matt

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 12:31 AM

Best view ever for me was at 9000 ft in Bortle 1/2 skies with my Fuji 25x150.....you could make out the "potato chip" extreme edges of the disk that is shown in long exposure images but rarely seen visually; a view never to be forgotten although 15 years ago.


My experience with the Fuji 25x150 I looked at Andromeda with was pretty much exactly the same. It is still etched in my mind 😳😎😁
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#16 Swedpat

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 03:01 AM

Total newbie here and having a blast with 12x50 and 10x40 binoculars. Is it possible to see the Andromeda Galaxy with 12x50 binoculars? Looking in the northwest sky during early morning hours, I spotted a very faint “dust cloud” about the size of a dime through the binoculars and was wondering if that is Andromeda Galaxy?

 

Under bad sky(within a society because of light pollution) you normally see only the bright center of the galaxy. But under dark sky in the countryside more of the galaxy becomes revealed like a dimmer haze around the center. Many years ago I experienced one of the best view ever and that was with my 11x80. The galaxy filled up the entire field of view!

And I am sure that I had seen that even with a 12x50 and 10x40.


Edited by Swedpat, 27 August 2019 - 03:02 AM.


#17 lestrade

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 05:31 AM

Under bad sky(within a society because of light pollution) you normally see only the bright center of the galaxy. But under dark sky in the countryside more of the galaxy becomes revealed like a dimmer haze around the center. Many years ago I experienced one of the best view ever and that was with my 11x80. The galaxy filled up the entire field of view!

And I am sure that I had seen that even with a 12x50 and 10x40.

Of course (12x50 and 10x40 too)!
With the smaller binoculars it's just a question of taste.
If you stabilize your binocular, you would be able to see also M32 at about four or five o'clock, better with the 12x50, because it appears similar/close to a star. With the 11x80 M110 at about eleven or twelve o'clock and a bit farer away from M31/Andromeda galaxy will be (relatively) most easy.

In my experience M110 is the more difficult satellite-galaxy-object since it REALLY requires dark skies. With 12x50 or even 10x40 M110 could be difficult with just a bit of light pollution. M32 is a rather easy object with at least 10x magnification, if you know about where to look: Very close to M31 at about four or five o'clock as i said, a bit similar to a smaller globular cluster - seen through a binocular. 

CS,
Herbert
 


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#18 S.Boerner

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 07:18 AM

To encourage you to look for more...

 

The Astronomical League has a Binocular Messier Observing Program (https://www.astrolea...s/binomess.html). 

Scroll down to the bottom of that page to see links to three appendices.  Appendix B has a listing of 102 of the 110 Messier Objects classified as easy (58), tougher(23), and challenge (21) in 11x80s.  Appendix A does the same thing for 7x35, 7x50, and 10x50s.


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#19 duck2k

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 10:45 AM

M31 never gets old. I view it all the time.smile.gif
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#20 Rich V.

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 11:07 AM

I find that 15x70s are about right for Andromeda, they're 4.4 degree field is sufficient for framing and the greater size is a plus.

 

Jon

I, too, really enjoy using my 16x70s under dark skies for observing M31, M32 and M110.  The 4°+ FOV frames the group perfectly.   waytogo.gif

 

Rich


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#21 Cestus

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 01:42 PM

I'm going to put that on my list and see if I can find it in my rather light polluted skies.



#22 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 03:53 PM

I, too, really enjoy using my 16x70s under dark skies for observing M31, M32 and M110.  The 4°+ FOV frames the group perfectly.   waytogo.gif

 

Rich

 

M31 is one of those objects that is best viewed in telescopes of all sizes.  Framing the entire galaxy with 15x70s is magic, hunting down bright nebulae and globulars in M31 with a 20 plus inch scope has it's own magic.

 

Jon


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#23 Tony Flanders

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 07:25 PM

M31 is one of those objects that is best viewed in telescopes of all sizes.

And M31 is also great at 1X, with only my prescription glasses for optical aid. Assuming dark skies, of course.

 

Here are a few other objects that are spectacular to the naked eye and through instruments of all sizes:

 

Hyades, Pleiades, Double Cluster, Messier 7, many more open clusters

M42, M8, M17, Eta Carinae Nebula

Magellanic Clouds, M33

The Milky Way

The night sky as a whole

 

I hesitate to say that any particular instrument is best for any particular object, since different instruments yield surprisingly different insights into the aesthetics and physical structure of deep-sky objects. Even for a single object, instruments of different sizes complement rather than compete with each other.


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#24 Mike Harvey

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 02:00 AM

I had the same near-religious experience as Mr. Bill on ONE night and for just 10 or 15 minutes when I first took my 120's to Chiefland. There are times (unfortunately fewer and further between) when portions of the sky over Chiefland are close to what I've seen, away from lighted areas, in Yellowstone. This was one of those times.

I've observed M-31 globulars and delved deep into the spiral arms with scopes up to 32" but nothing else has affected me the way seeing it as Bill described. ..And with M-32 and NGC-205 both in the same field.

It's something you yearn to see again but, so far, a once-in-my-lifetime event.


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#25 SMark

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 02:52 AM

Right now M31 is straight-up zenith, and I catch it every night I can. I very much enjoyed it tonight. Every binocular presents it well.


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