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Please Dad, I wanna scope with clock drive

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#1 Chesterguy1

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 12:29 PM

Here's a followup to my moon ball post.

 

The king of the Edmond Scientific Reflectors in 1965 was the 8". Ahhh...who could ever afford such a beauty? Certainly not me and an out of the question extravagance for my financially prudent parents. Setting circles; $18! You had to pay extra. The 6" has a clock drive. Ooh, la, la. I think I wanted the 6" more because of the clock drive. It had a appliance-type, two-prong plug to attach an extension cord.

 

1965: ES 6" $199.50; Transportation Charges Collect; Shipping weight: 68 lbs. 1965 Avg family Income: $6900

 

2019: ES 6" $1624.95 inflation adjusted; 2019. Avg family Income: $73,891

 

 

1965  ES 8" $389.00; Transportation Charges: Call (that sounds ominous); Shipping weight 200 lbs in three boxes. 1965 Avg family Income: $6900 or 5.63% of average family's yearly income.

 

2019: ES 8" $3168.45 inflation adjusted. 2019. Avg family Income: $73,891

 

Per Astronomics website listing: 2019 CELESTRON 8" ADVANCED VX SERIES GO-TO EQUATORIAL NEWTONIAN $1229.00.  2019. Avg family Income: $73,891 or 1.66% of average family's yearly income. An 8" dob would be considerably expensive less but closer in character to the 8" as offered by ES.

 

Like Lake Wobegon, we know that the entire AA community is above average in everything. lol.gif We are also living in a golden age. If only we could have the light pollution of 1965!

 

Chesterguy

 

ES 8%22 reflector.jpg

 

 

 

 


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#2 Augustus

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 12:49 PM

What's funny is that telescope prices have more or less stood still with inflation - a 6" Dob can be had for $250 today and an 8" for $389.......


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#3 ngc7319_20

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 02:18 PM

What's funny is that telescope prices have more or less stood still with inflation - a 6" Dob can be had for $250 today and an 8" for $389.......

A Criterion RV-6 (6" Newtonian) on a motorized EQ mount still goes for $200 to $400 on the used market....


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#4 TOMDEY

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 02:19 PM

The other change is what kids ask for and what parents feel obliged to shower on them... as some sorta birth right. I looked at those ads way back then... and started saving up paper route money for a six-inch mirror grinding kit and this focuser. Within a year, I had a nice telescope! The SM spider came from a lamp shade in the attic. Couple years later I hear mom, yelling from the attic... "Tommy?!"

 

The thing is... there's a lot to be gained by letting kids work for stuff, concoct their own solutions, games, etc. Come to think of it... that carries all the way forward to college (or not). I paid for mine with the post-Vietnam GI Bill, the NYS competitive "War Service Scholarship" (only 200/year awarded), and my employers (B&L, Kodak) allowing me flex-hours to attend day-classes. Finished the degrees with zero debt!

 

As Frost consuls... "And that has made all the difference."    Tom

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#5 Chesterguy1

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 05:59 PM

What's funny is that telescope prices have more or less stood still with inflation - a 6" Dob can be had for $250 today and an 8" for $389.......


And the $1200 EQ mounted 8” from Astronomics is lighter, has GOTO/tracking and the focuser and finderscope are better. I can’t speak to the optics, but I would expect greater consistency given the economies of scale in the 8” market. I mean, how many 8” were getting sold in 1965?

We all know the value of a 6”-8” dob as a starter scope. My 8” is my most used scope.

One of the most impressive aspects of the market today is the sheer variety of manufacturers, scopes and price points.

Chesterguy

Edited by Chesterguy1, 31 August 2019 - 05:59 PM.


#6 Chesterguy1

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 06:07 PM

The other change is what kids ask for and what parents feel obliged to shower on them... as some sorta birth right. I looked at those ads way back then... and started saving up paper route money for a six-inch mirror grinding kit and this focuser. Within a year, I had a nice telescope! The SM spider came from a lamp shade in the attic. Couple years later I hear mom, yelling from the attic... "Tommy?!"
 
The thing is... there's a lot to be gained by letting kids work for stuff, concoct their own solutions, games, etc. Come to think of it... that carries all the way forward to college (or not). I paid for mine with the post-Vietnam GI Bill, the NYS competitive "War Service Scholarship" (only 200/year awarded), and my employers (B&L, Kodak) allowing me flex-hours to attend day-classes. Finished the degrees with zero debt!
 
As Frost consuls... "And that has made all the difference."    Tom


One had a real appreciation for the cost of something when handing over cash. I remember saving up for weeks for a $12 small tape recorder from K-Mart in the mid-60s. My allowance was 75 cents per week so a $180 scope was pure fantasy. My dad bought a reflector of dubious character and flimsy mount from a department store for $19.95. Even that seemed like a luxury item to me.

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#7 TOMDEY

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Posted 31 August 2019 - 06:28 PM

One had a real appreciation for the cost of something when handing over cash. I remember saving up for weeks for a $12 small tape recorder from K-Mart in the mid-60s. My allowance was 75 cents per week so a $180 scope was pure fantasy. My dad bought a reflector of dubious character and flimsy mount from a department store for $19.95. Even that seemed like a luxury item to me.
Chesterguy

I distinctly remember not being envious of the "rich kids"... not in the slightest. It didn't seem to be a common personality flaw back then. I saved up dough for a baseball glove seemed forever. Mom found my stash in the hall linen closet and suggested I buy shoes with it... which I did! So I kept borrowing gloves from the competing teams for another year! On the plus side, most families in our neighborhood were poor... most certainly by today's standards. We mostly made our own toys and crafted things to present to others on birthdays, Christmas, etc. Same with the girls... knitting, crochet, dress-making... they all knew how to do those things, and did each other's hair and nails at home.

 

And the default entertainment, requiring no purchased toys --- borrow some tools and, literally --- dig a hole! Just a hole, for no other reason than to find out what might be down there! We found fossils, arrowheads, thousands of "oyster shells" ... assumed they were from Indians, hundreds of years ago?! And convinced that if you were to pull the plug on today's kids' toys, devices, computers, TV, camps, structured teams, lessons, tuition, enrichments... they would quickly --- do just fine!

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#8 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 01 September 2019 - 11:24 AM

Ahh yes, those were the "good old days", Edmund Scientific's and The Little Rascals. gramps.gif I used to save up money all year so I could by myself some Astronomy goodies for Christmas mostly from Edmund.



#9 Chesterguy1

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Posted 01 September 2019 - 12:02 PM

 

 

And the default entertainment, requiring no purchased toys --- borrow some tools and, literally --- dig a hole! Just a hole, for no other reason than to find out what might be down there! We found fossils, arrowheads, thousands of "oyster shells" ... 

I had those small urges. I would make things from whatever I could get my hands on. Spent loads of time making models, drawing on scraps of paper, copying stuff from books and magazines, just reading for pleasure and entertainment. I'm convinced those impulses are why I make art today.

 

Chesterguy 




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