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Cosmic Challenge: Emission Nebula Simeis 57

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#1 PhilH

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Posted 01 September 2019 - 10:23 AM

Simeis 57 is one of the most intriguing emission nebulae in the late summer sky, yet it is almost unknown to visual observers. Photographers, however, know it as a pair of opposing arcs of reddish light, one extending to the north, the other to the south, that appear to be spinning symmetrically away from a common center. Its unusual appearance has led to its two nicknames: the Propeller Nebula or the Garden Sprinkler Nebula.

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#2 John O'Hara

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 04:39 PM

I don't own a scope in this size class, but I have buddies who do that will be coming to the Black Forest Star Party later this month.  More to come!


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#3 David Knisely

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 06:17 PM

"a Hydrogen-Beta (Hβ) filter, which rarely seems to help objects beyond the Horsehead Nebula,"???  Oh, Phil, where have you been? :-)

 

USEFUL TARGETS FOR THE H-BETA FILTER

While the H-Beta is probably one of the less-used nebula filters, the commonly expressed idea that it works only on a handful of objects is not necessarily true.  Here is a list of *some* of the more prominent objects that the H-Beta may be at least somewhat useful on.  Some may require larger apertures (and some may be slightly better in other filters), but a few have been seen from a dark sky site by just holding the filter up to the unaided eye and looking at the sky.  Some of these will also be helped by a narrow-band filter like the Lumicon UHC. 

 

1.  IC 434 (HORSEHEAD NEBULA)
2.  NGC 1499 (CALIFORNIA NEBULA, naked eye and RFT)
3.  M43 (part of the Great Orion Nebula)
4.  IC 5146 (COCOON NEBULA in Cygnus)
5.  M20 (TRIFID NEBULA, main section)
6.  NGC 2327 (diffuse nebula in Monoceros, part of the Seagull)
7.  IC 405 (the FLAMING STAR NEBULA in Auriga)
8.  IC 417 (diffuse Nebula in Auriga)
9.  IC 1283 (diffuse Nebula in Sagittarius)
10. IC 1318 GAMMA CYGNI NEBULA (diffuse nebula in Cygnus)
11. IC 2177: SEAGULL NEBULA (Diffuse Nebula, Monoceros)
12. IC 5076 (diffuse nebula, Cygnus)
13. PK64+5.1 "CAMPBELL'S HYDROGEN STAR" Cygnus (PNG 64.7+5.0)
14. Sh2-157a (small round nebula inside larger Sh2-157, Cassiopeia)
15. Sh2-235 (diffuse nebula in Auriga).
16. Sh2-276 "BARNARD'S LOOP" (diffuse nebula in Orion, naked eye)
17. IC 2162 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion)
18  Sh2-254 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion near IC 2162)
19. Sh2-256-7 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion near IC 2162)
20. vdB93 (Gum-1) (diffuse nebula in Monoceros near IC 2177)
21. Lambda Orionis nebular complex (very large, naked-eye)   
22. Sh2-273 "Cone" Nebula portion south of nebulous cluster NGC 2264

 

In addition, a number of the brighter nebulae like NGC 7000 or M42 will respond to H-Beta use for revealing certain specific detail, although other filters may provide a somewhat better view overall.  Clear skies to you.


Edited by David Knisely, 04 September 2019 - 09:34 PM.

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#4 John O'Hara

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 06:49 PM

David,

 

Of the objects listed above, which, if any, would you consider H-Beta to be the best option?  I've also long believed that the H-Beta was primarily for the California and Horsehead nebulae, and have never made the plunge to purchase one, despite being a deep-sky observer for 40 years.  My scopes range in size from 2.4" to 12.5".  Sound's like it's high time I take the plunge.

 

Thanks,
John



#5 David Knisely

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 09:41 PM

David,

 

Of the objects listed above, which, if any, would you consider H-Beta to be the best option?  I've also long believed that the H-Beta was primarily for the California and Horsehead nebulae, and have never made the plunge to purchase one, despite being a deep-sky observer for 40 years.  My scopes range in size from 2.4" to 12.5".  Sound's like it's high time I take the plunge.

 

Thanks,
John

The California Nebula is certainly the most prominent with the H-Beta, as I have held it up to my eye and seen it using just the filter and no other optical aid.  The Trifid's main section looks larger in the H-Beta than in almost any other filter, yet appears to be kind of weird looking with that filter, as it kills the nebulosity right around the central double star, as well as killing off the reflection nebulosity next door.  The IC 1318 Gamma Cygni nebular complex also responds well to the H-Beta, although it is faint and you do need a richest-field instrument to really get much of it in the field of view.   The "propeller" nebula is adjacent to the Gamma Cygni complex, so it isn't surprising that the H-Beta filter would help it most.  Clear skies to you.  


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#6 micromaxcomputer

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 11:03 PM

Dear Phil,

Thanks for recommending this challenge object as I thought under my Bortle 8 skies and modest equipment this object was certainly out of reach. But using my Orion ED80 with an Astronimik CCD CLS filter and ZWO ASI174mc cooled camera, this image is the result of a clear New Jersey night, 35 90sec. images stacked and only put through DSS. 

Avid follower,

Daryl L. 

simeis57

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#7 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 01:57 PM

"a Hydrogen-Beta (Hβ) filter, which rarely seems to help objects beyond the Horsehead Nebula,"???  Oh, Phil, where have you been? :-)

 

USEFUL TARGETS FOR THE H-BETA FILTER

While the H-Beta is probably one of the less-used nebula filters, the commonly expressed idea that it works only on a handful of objects is not necessarily true.  Here is a list of *some* of the more prominent objects that the H-Beta may be at least somewhat useful on.  Some may require larger apertures (and some may be slightly better in other filters), but a few have been seen from a dark sky site by just holding the filter up to the unaided eye and looking at the sky.  Some of these will also be helped by a narrow-band filter like the Lumicon UHC. 

 

1.  IC 434 (HORSEHEAD NEBULA)
2.  NGC 1499 (CALIFORNIA NEBULA, naked eye and RFT)
3.  M43 (part of the Great Orion Nebula)
4.  IC 5146 (COCOON NEBULA in Cygnus)
5.  M20 (TRIFID NEBULA, main section)
6.  NGC 2327 (diffuse nebula in Monoceros, part of the Seagull)
7.  IC 405 (the FLAMING STAR NEBULA in Auriga)
8.  IC 417 (diffuse Nebula in Auriga)
9.  IC 1283 (diffuse Nebula in Sagittarius)
10. IC 1318 GAMMA CYGNI NEBULA (diffuse nebula in Cygnus)
11. IC 2177: SEAGULL NEBULA (Diffuse Nebula, Monoceros)
12. IC 5076 (diffuse nebula, Cygnus)
13. PK64+5.1 "CAMPBELL'S HYDROGEN STAR" Cygnus (PNG 64.7+5.0)
14. Sh2-157a (small round nebula inside larger Sh2-157, Cassiopeia)
15. Sh2-235 (diffuse nebula in Auriga).
16. Sh2-276 "BARNARD'S LOOP" (diffuse nebula in Orion, naked eye)
17. IC 2162 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion)
18  Sh2-254 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion near IC 2162)
19. Sh2-256-7 (diffuse nebula in northern Orion near IC 2162)
20. vdB93 (Gum-1) (diffuse nebula in Monoceros near IC 2177)
21. Lambda Orionis nebular complex (very large, naked-eye)   
22. Sh2-273 "Cone" Nebula portion south of nebulous cluster NGC 2264

 

In addition, a number of the brighter nebulae like NGC 7000 or M42 will respond to H-Beta use for revealing certain specific detail, although other filters may provide a somewhat better view overall.  Clear skies to you.

I was wondering if this would be mentioned. wink.gif 


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