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Galaxies in Pegasus, Perseus and Andromeda

sketching observing observing report
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#1 Vedran

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 12:01 PM

On Saturday, 31th August, I went out to test new observing location, about 75 km from my home, or around 1.5h drive. It is placed on Zrinska gora, mountain range of about 400 to 600 m in height, in sparsely populated region of Croatia. I reckon that SQM measurements for this location should be in 21.6 to 21.7 mpas range, much better than in our Dark sky park Petrova gora (21.5) or my local observing site (21.2).

 

After arriving at location, I was disappointed by the darkness of night sky. SQM measure 21.55, which is good, but sky was bright, low contrast. Whole Saturday was sunny and without a cloud, but sky was bright blue and hazy, hence the reason for bad transparency that night. There were occasional flashes of light from thunderstorm about 30 km to the south.

 

Again, I used my trusty SkyWatcher 300/1500 GoTo Dobsonian with following eyepieces:
Baader Hyperion 10.5mm (143x, 28’ FOV)
SkyWatcher SkyPanorama 15mm (100x, 50’)
SkyWatcher SkyPanorama 7mm (214x, 22’)
SkyWatcher Planetary 6mm (250x, 14’)
SkyWatcher Planetary 5mm (300x, 12’)
and Baader 2” OIII filter.

 

 

I’ve started observing another “sector” from my trusty atlas placed between RA 22h and 23 h, and DEC +30° and 40°. First object on my list was NGC 7331.

 

NGC 7331, spiral galaxy in Pegasus, m=9.5

143x: Very bright, elongated galaxy with 4:1 difference between longer and short axis. Central parts of it are dominated by bright, oval region, which gets progressively brighter towards center.
214x: Galaxy looks almost same as at 143x, just it is larger. Central bright oval is now better defined, with shaper edges, especially on right.
250x: Central oval looks like it is offset from true center of the galaxy. Also, there is one discrete brightening on lower part of galaxy, halfway between central region and its outer extensions. Sketching!

I also saw few other smudges of light in same field of view with NGC 7331, which are not listed in atlas.

 

NGC 7335, lenticular galaxy in Pegasus, m=13.3
214x: Faint, small and fuzzy cloud of light. It looks like it is slightly brighter in center.

 

NGC 7337, spiral galaxy in Pegasus, m=14.4
214x: Small, very faint fudge of light. Roundish with starlike core. It is hard to see any clear details because it “dances” on edge of visibility.

 

NGC 7340, elliptical galaxy in Pegasus, m=13.7
214x: Small, very faint cloud without any kind of details.

Next is Stephan’s quintet. It is not quintet for my eyes, but only quartet.

 

NGC 7320, spiral galaxy in Pegasus, m=12.6
214x: Faint, oval cloud which is slightly brighter in center.

 

NGC 7319, spiral galaxy in Pegasus, m=13.1
214x: Very faint, small and fuzzy cloud.

 

NGC 7318A/B, interacting galaxies in Pegasus, m=13.1
214x: Oval, very faint cloud which contains starlike object left of center.

 

NGC 7317, elliptical galaxy in Pegasus, m=13.6
214x: Barely detected with averted vision, extremely faint smudge.

It looks like about 2 or 3’ above Stephan’s Quintet is another extremely faint smudge, jumping in and out of view. Cartes du Ciel says that it could be NGC 7320A, but listed magnitude for this galaxy is 15, so I’m skeptical. I will have to repeat this observation in better conditions.
Moving on to other objects in this sector.

 

NGC 7265, elliptical galaxy in Lacerta, m=12.1

214x: Oval, faint and smallish cloud. There is a prominent bright disc in center.

 

NGC 7292, irregular galaxy in Pegasus, m=12.5
214x: Very faint smudge with irregular, not well defined edges. It is somewhat brighter in central parts.

 

NGC 7217, spiral galaxy in Pegasus, m=10.1
214x: Bright, round galaxy, rather large. It slowly gains in brightness until about ¾ of radius, when brightness suddenly jumps. No other details in texture or surface brightness were noted. The galaxy looks like unresolved globular cluster in small telescope.

This was last object in sector between RA 22h and 23h, and DEC +30° to +40°.

I switched then again to NGC 6879, planetary nebula that eluded detection on my last session.

 

NGC 6879, planetary nebula in Saggitae, m=12.5
300x with OIII: I’ve scanned sky with and without filter, but no nebulous objects or “fat” stars were seen.

Next was a border region between Andromeda and Perseus.

 

NGC 891, spiral galaxy in Andromeda, m=9.9
143x: Faint but large galaxy. It spans around quarter of FOV, or about 7’. It is very elongated, I’ve estimated ratio of longer and shorter axis to be 5:1. The galaxy is wider in middle, but not much. Dark lane bisects galaxy and few stars from Milky way are superimposed on it.

 

NGC 812, spiral galaxy in Andromeda, m=11.3
143x: Very faint, fuzzy nebula. It has even surface brightness without any mottling or variations. It is slightly oval and it is partially obscured by nearby star.

 

NGC 846, spiral galaxy in Andromeda, m=12.1
143x. Faint, elongated nebula with barely noticeable bar of light along longer axis. I can’t see central brightening, core or any other similar details. Smallish.

 

NGC 910, elliptical galaxy in Andromeda, m=12.0
 143x: I can see two nebulous objects in eyepiece. NGC 910 is one of them. It is faint i tiny cloud with slightly brighter center. 

 

NGC 913, lenticular galaxy in Andromeda, m=15.0
 143x: Second nebulous object in eyepiece, near NGC 91 0. Extremely faint streak of light without details. 

There are two galaxies near position where I’ve noticed second nebulous object in field of view, NGC 912 and NGC 913. After examining DSS images, I’ve concluded that NGC 913 better fits my description.

 

NGC 980, lenticular galaxy in Andromeda, m=13.0
143x: Again, there are two nebulous objects in eyepiece instead of one, as shown in atlas. NGC 980 is one of them, very faint with streak of light in middle. That streak of light is somewhat brighter in central parts of galaxy.

 

NGC 982, spiral galaxy in Andromeda, m=12.5
143x: Very faint smudge, small and round, with blurry edges. It looks like fuzzy star.

 

NGC 1003, spiral galaxy in Perseus, m=11.5
143x: Faint nebula near faint star. It is small, oval, but on the side which is closer to the star it looks like it has semicircular cutout. Maybe star itself partially blocks galaxy and produces this effect.

 

NGC 1122, spiral galaxy in Perseus, m=12.1
143x: Faint, small and oval nebula with core that looks like fuzzy faint star.

 

Messier 34, open cluster in Perseus, m=5.2
100x: Huge, brilliant cluster of hundred or so stars. The cluster fills out eyepiece completely. Central part of cluster has rectangular grouping of stars with many star chains emerging from it. Two most prominent, richest chains are going up (approximately south) from central grouping. Wonderful cluster but it needs appropriate instrument, like small telescope or binoculars, to enjoy it.

 

NGC 956, open cluster in Perseus, m=8.9
100x: Faint and not overly prominent chain of stars that is shaped like number “2”, at least in Newtonian telescope. The chain contains about 20 stars of different brightness.

Observing session was now over 2h long and I got tired. If I didn’t race 200 km bicycle race on that morning, I would probably continue to observe, but my eyes were getting heavy. Also, there was a 1.5h long drive home that was waiting for me.

 

Original post in Croatia with drawings:
https://zvjezdopisi....8-31-cavlovica/


Edited by Vedran, 03 September 2019 - 12:02 PM.

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#2 jim kuhns

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 12:27 PM

Noticed you did not mention NGC 7078, M15 one of my favorite targets during very late summer and early autumn. 

It appears you where observing  in a certain section of the sky.


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#3 jayrome

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 01:21 PM

Nice observations!

 

They say that NGC 7331 is almost identical to the Andromeda Galaxy in both appearance and its nature, except that it's 20 times farther. I've only recently started observing this area of the sky, but I plan on revisiting it soon!



#4 starblue

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 02:36 PM

I'm curious how you created the notes for your observing session. You observed for ~2 hours and packed in a lot of details. There's no way you could've written all those notes (and created 2 quality drawings!) with pencil/pen/paper in that length of time. Maybe you used a voice recorder and transcribed them the next day? Anyway, great observations!



#5 Vedran

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 03:01 PM

Noticed you did not mention NGC 7078, M15 one of my favorite targets during very late summer and early autumn. 

It appears you where observing  in a certain section of the sky.

I've observed M15 on more than two dozen occasion. There are 17 mentions of M15 in my logs, and I've probably made more than 30 "quick peaks" without writing it down. Also, I made 2 or 3 drawings etc... I'm now focused on swiping certain sections of sky for all objects listed in sky atlas that I use.

 

I'm curious how you created the notes for your observing session. You observed for ~2 hours and packed in a lot of details. There's no way you could've written all those notes (and created 2 quality drawings!) with pencil/pen/paper in that length of time. Maybe you used a voice recorder and transcribed them the next day? Anyway, great observations!

Actually, drawing of Stephan's Quintet is from my archive. It was made 8 years ago (Sept 24th 2011.).

When I'm behind telescope I write down short descriptions which are later "converted" to normal sounding sentences :) That why I spend most of time observing, and less time recording what was seen. Also, I'm proficient in locating deep sky objects with 1350+ different objects in my logs. GoTo on my current telescope is actually to slow and not enough accurate enough for my taste.

 

Sometimes it seems to me that I'm too quick while observing, which causes me to miss those subtle details that emerge when you spend some time with object.

 

Here is a sample how my log looks like, It's in Croatian of course. PDF reader may be required to see it.


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#6 Asbytec

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 03:05 PM

"Sometimes it seems to me that I'm too quick while observing, which causes me to miss those subtle details that emerge when you spend some time with object."

Very much agree. I've seen NGC 7331, so I checked your sketch. One of the details I look for in galaxies is a sharp edge indicative of a dust lane. It takes a while sometimes to determine which edge appears more sharply defined than the other. Once we've done this a few times, and get it right, we know what a dust lane looks like in similar galaxies. We know the affect they have on the image we see. Looks like your sketch wants to show it, as well. One surprising galaxy in NGC 2683. Once we realize what we're seeing.

#7 KidOrion

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 04:15 PM

I think, with your aperture, that you'd have some fun trawling around in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster, around NGCs 7619 and 7626. Lots of small fuzzies there.


Edited by KidOrion, 04 September 2019 - 04:15 PM.

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#8 starblue

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 07:49 PM

When I'm behind telescope I write down short descriptions which are later "converted" to normal sounding sentences smile.gif That why I spend most of time observing, and less time recording what was seen. Also, I'm proficient in locating deep sky objects with 1350+ different objects in my logs. GoTo on my current telescope is actually to slow and not enough accurate enough for my taste.

 

Sometimes it seems to me that I'm too quick while observing, which causes me to miss those subtle details that emerge when you spend some time with object.

 

Here is a sample how my log looks like, It's in Croatian of course. PDF reader may be required to see it.

Thanks for replying. I must be too expansive when writing notes at the scope. I spend 15-20 minutes per object on average. Half of the time is spent observing the object and the other half writing about it. 


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#9 Vedran

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 04:19 AM

Thanks for replying. I must be too expansive when writing notes at the scope. I spend 15-20 minutes per object on average. Half of the time is spent observing the object and the other half writing about it. 

Everyone has it's own tempo while observing, it's not a race :)

 

I think, with your aperture, that you'd have some fun trawling around in the Pegasus I galaxy cluster, around NGCs 7619 and 7626. Lots of small fuzzies there.

Interesting. I've observed those galaxies 12 years ago and didn't revisit them after. Thanks.



#10 jim kuhns

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 09:28 PM

Vedran noticed in your drawing of M15 there appears pease I, a very dim planetary.
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#11 Astro-Master

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 12:42 AM

You skipped my favorite galaxy pair in Pegasus NGC 7332 and 7339, best seen at 200x to 300x or more.



#12 Vedran

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 01:06 AM

Vedran noticed in your drawing of M15 there appears pease I, a very dim planetary.

Wow, I know that planetary nebula exists in M15, but didn't imagine that it would be visible in 12" in suburban sky.
Could you please point it on my sketch, if it is not problem?



#13 Vedran

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 01:08 AM

You skipped my favorite galaxy pair in Pegasus NGC 7332 and 7339, best seen at 200x to 300x or more.

I was out last night, observing report that includes this pair is on the way :)



#14 jim kuhns

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 12:53 PM

Wow, I know that planetary nebula exists in M15, but didn't imagine that it would be visible in 12" in suburban sky.
Could you please point it on my sketch, if it is not problem?

Wow, I know that planetary nebula exists in M15, but didn't imagine that it would be visible in 12" in suburban sky.
Could you please point it on my sketch, if it is not problem?

I noticed a circle of haze at the 9 o'clock position from the center when I
scroll in on your drawing.

#15 Vedran

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 04:25 PM

I think that it's just drawing artifact or clustering of stars. Pease 1 should be at 4 o'clock, near core on my sketch.


Edited by Vedran, 06 September 2019 - 04:25 PM.


#16 jim kuhns

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 09:45 PM

Thanks for getting me straight as to what I was seeing.


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