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Favorite TV/Movie astronomy oddities

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#26 helpwanted

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 12:01 PM

not astronomy related, but i watched a caveman type of movie recently and 2 of the cavemen had on sneakers!



#27 KidOrion

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 05:31 PM

It's A Wonderful Life uses Stephan's Quintet to represent the angels.

 

Every time I observe the Quintet, I feel like shouting "We've got to help George Bailey."


Edited by KidOrion, 18 October 2019 - 05:32 PM.

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#28 Headshot

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 10:24 AM

In the classic sci-fi movie Destination Moon, after the spaceship lands on the moon they are told that the Big Eye (the 200-inch Palomar Telescope) has them in view.

 

Must have been a night with exception seeing and a VERY good eyepiece?

 

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#29 Joe1950

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 11:20 AM

That was a great film. Ahead of its time for reality. 



#30 Headshot

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 02:51 PM

Yes it was. Despite the out of date SPFX, I would really like a Blu-Ray remastered DVD of it.


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#31 hdavid

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 04:20 PM

What drives me nuts is the time paradox created in just about every other Star Trek episode, movie, and spin-off.  Makes for some entertaining plot lines, but the Butterfly Effect seems to have no effect in the Star Trek universe.  Professor Lorenz would be disappointed.

 

If anyone from the future is reading this, go home before you screw things up even worse -- if you still have a home left.  If not, get in touch and we'll work something out.  Maybe free room and board in exchange for a few sports tips. waytogo.gif 


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#32 grzesznypl

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 04:44 PM

Sci-fi movies are not made to be scientifically and astronomically correct or accurate. They are made for entertainment of the general public. They are full of inaccuracies, goofs, character errors, continuity errors, plot holes, revealing mistakes, factual errors, and other oddities. 


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#33 Kyphoron

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 02:14 AM

Sci-fi movies are not made to be scientifically and astronomically correct or accurate. They are made for entertainment of the general public. They are full of inaccuracies, goofs, character errors, continuity errors, plot holes, revealing mistakes, factual errors, and other oddities. 

I could be wrong but my feeling is that the topic starter meant this as a tongue in cheek  and not a serious post. The further you go back in TV history the more errors you will find and this is not only for Sci-Fi stuff either. Back in the 60's on Sky At Night (a British show on astronomy) Sir Patrick Moore live says something like " In just a few minutes we will have our first look at mars with its flowing rivers and forest."  as one of the mars missions was about to send back the first ever close up surface photos of mars.

 

I could for this matter say that even historically factual movies (Titanic, Saving Private Ryan) and many others have taken creative liberties of events that didn't happen the way they appeared on screen. So lets all sit back and enjoy our flight to our nearest star Alpha Centuri  (Yes I know its Proxima) with the crew of the Jupiter 2.


Edited by Kyphoron, 23 October 2019 - 02:16 AM.

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#34 Cliff C

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 08:28 AM

2001: A Space Odyssey, as Dr. Floyd is on his way to the Moon there is a photo clearly showing Tycho in full daylight. When they arrive at the Monolth pit at Tycho, it is the sunrise that triggers the radio transmission, oops. There are other numerous faux pas but I'm just nit picking.


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#35 WarmWeatherGuy

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 10:58 AM

Things I noticed about 2001: A Space Odyssey. 1) The rocket kicked up dust when it landed on the Moon. The dust swirled as though there was an atmosphere, not a vacuum. 2) When Hal killed his last victim he left him adrift in space. His buddy came to get him in a space pod. Instead of flying directly to his body he flew in a spiral pattern, wasting time and fuel. If he flew directly to him he would see his body among stationary stars. Instead we saw the stars moving behind the body as we approached.



#36 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 03:16 PM

ack in the 60's on Sky At Night (a British show on astronomy) Sir Patrick Moore live says something like " In just a few minutes we will have our first look at mars with its flowing rivers and forest."  as one of the mars missions was about to send back the first ever close up surface photos of mars.

 

Moore also believed that lunar craters were mainly due to vulcanism.

"Chapter 2, entitled ‘Theories of Crater Origin: Historical Summary,’ relates the theories which have been proposed to explain the origin of what is undoubtedly the most well-known features of the Moon’s surface – the craters. These essentially fall into two categories – impact and volcanic. While Moore and Cattermole do not deny that impact craters exist on the Moon, they emphasise that it is the volcanic theory of origins that they favour to explain the greater part of the lunar crater phenomenon."

 

https://www.amazon.c...e/dp/0393063550

 



#37 RichA

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 03:33 PM

Not TV but...

 

https://www.ebay.com...EMAAOSwrZZdNdN6

 

 



#38 Mike McShan

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Posted 29 October 2019 - 09:53 PM

Yep, the show's set in the not too distant future, couple hundred years from now, right here in our very own solar system. Everyone, watch this show!

I agree - it's a really great show... quite addictive.

 

Clear skies, Mike



#39 KidOrion

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Posted 01 November 2019 - 01:39 AM

Yep, the show's set in the not too distant future

Next Sunday, AD?



#40 tchandler

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 05:13 PM

I could be wrong but my feeling is that the topic starter meant this as a tongue in cheek  and not a serious post. The further you go back in TV history the more errors you will find and this is not only for Sci-Fi stuff either. Back in the 60's on Sky At Night (a British show on astronomy) Sir Patrick Moore live says something like " In just a few minutes we will have our first look at mars with its flowing rivers and forest."  as one of the mars missions was about to send back the first ever close up surface photos of mars.

 

I could for this matter say that even historically factual movies (Titanic, Saving Private Ryan) and many others have taken creative liberties of events that didn't happen the way they appeared on screen. So lets all sit back and enjoy our flight to our nearest star Alpha Centuri  (Yes I know its Proxima) with the crew of the Jupiter 2.

Yep. And here’s another thing. They’re all actors! 
 



#41 tchandler

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Posted 03 November 2019 - 05:34 PM

And on a separate note, I was a little disappointed (although not surprised) that few, if any, of the astronomical references made it from the LOTR books into the movies. Just a few glimpses of the moon in a couple of scenes, but just as eye candy. But, in fairness to Peter Jackson, there was already way to much in these films. 
 

But these books! Astronomical references abounded. One of the most prevalent was the phases of the moon. It was such a natural way to express the passage of time. Coincident observations of the moon linked characters together in a more meaningful way. Tolkien was so thorough in his astronomy that he investigated the timing of the rising of the moon day by day. Not all readers likely would notice such a precise detail but I’ll bet a few of us here would. That devotion to detail deepens the illusion. When writers or cinematographers don’t pay heed to it, it breaks the spell. And the illusion is lost. 


Edited by tchandler, 03 November 2019 - 05:37 PM.

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#42 Sketcher

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 10:56 PM

Worth watching: Corner Gas season 3, episode 17 (title: "Telescope Trouble") -- available on Amazon Prime.




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