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First look through a Nagler...

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#26 25585

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 11:17 PM

I remember first sights of M13, M31 and M45 with the T1. I then bought a Lumicon OIII and seeing M45 & M57 with that was a new experience again.

 

For planets, Mars was fantastic with its polar ice caps.

 

My poor 1.25" focuser suffered as the 13mm needed winding out much more than before, and though not needed for size , I changed it for a 2" for strength.  



#27 Schurke

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 12:19 PM

Last weekend i had my first look through a nagler, and yeah it was WOW! I also had the first look through an ethos that night and it was more like... hmm, alright.
I was thinking of getting some morpheus ep's, they seem reasonably priced, but i might have to rethink that.
Please someone tell me the morpheus is just as good as the nagler! Please... :)

#28 25585

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Posted 06 September 2019 - 03:29 PM

Last weekend i had my first look through a nagler, and yeah it was WOW! I also had the first look through an ethos that night and it was more like... hmm, alright.
I was thinking of getting some morpheus ep's, they seem reasonably priced, but i might have to rethink that.
Please someone tell me the morpheus is just as good as the nagler! Please... smile.gif

Better for me. More comfortable viewing, still sharp. As with Orion LHDs 80°.



#29 scotsman328i

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 09:28 PM

Wow...  I think I get it now.  

 

I'm fairly new to this hobby, but researching equipment I quickly learned the name Nagler.  I always thought they were out of my budget but I lucked up and was able to snag a used 9mm T6 off eBay for a steal of a price (I don't think the seller really knew what they had).  Got it in the mail last night and took it out for a spin.  Simply put, it's an absolute game changer. 

 

I used it with my 102ED at about 80x.  I was blown away... wide views, sharp everywhere I looked, and very comfortable.  Felt like I was floating in space.  I screwed on my 2x barlow lens cell to get a higher mag on Saturn and to my surprise somehow it just got even better and more comfortable.  This instantly became my new favorite eyepiece.

 

I'm realizing though that this EP has spoiled me in just one outing.  I'm already thinking of my other eyepieces as lesser than and wondering what all I can sell in order to acquire more Naglers.

Now...my friend...is when the money starts to disappear...LOL.

”once you go Nagler, you never go back.” 



#30 csrlice12

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 11:31 PM

Hey kid, come'ere....come look thru this here Pentax XW...


Edited by csrlice12, 12 September 2019 - 11:32 PM.

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#31 jjack's

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 02:08 AM

I say yes, morpheus are as good as naglers. My morpheus 17.5 replace the panoptic 19 and nagler 16. Wide field (same AFOV), compactness, better eyerelief, double barrel, light enough, as good to the edge, coatings seem darker. A true winner smile.gif


Edited by jjack's, 13 September 2019 - 02:10 AM.

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#32 Mike W

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 06:02 PM

I finally took the plunge and ordered my first Televue eyepiece, a 7mm Delite. While it does not have the same field expansive view as a Nagler, it certainly was the sharpest member of my modest eyepiece collection. In short order, I now have a 5mm, 7mm, 11mm and 18.2mm, with a used 3mm on the way. For wider fields of view, I purchased a well taken care of 27mm Panoptic. I am thrilled with the clarity of my views compared to my other eyepieces. I should have done this years ago. Welcome to the wonderful world of Televue.

My lineup is similar, 24 pan, 19 pan, 18 radian, 14 radian, 10 rad, 8 rad, and 6 rad. If you don't need the full 20mm E/R you may like the 19 pan over the 18.2 D.



#33 jeffmac

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 06:50 PM

Yeah, the T6 series is very nice, small and compact. When I first got my used 13mm it took me a little while to keep my head in the right place and not get black out. Now it's know problem, a favorite EP of mine. I never tried a barlow on it, but will give it a try on Jupiter and Saturn next time out. I have the 19mm Pan by them and that's another favorite in that focal range. It fit's my eye socket like a glove!


The planetary views through my 13mm T6 barlowed are very sharp. Try it. I think you'll like it.

#34 joseph07081

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 08:10 PM

My lineup is similar, 24 pan, 19 pan, 18 radian, 14 radian, 10 rad, 8 rad, and 6 rad. If you don't need the full 20mm E/R you may like the 19 pan over the 18.2 D.

Unfortunately I do need the extra eye relief, either for Dioptrx use or with my glasses. Eye relief was one of the most important criteria when I decided to upgrade my eyepieces. So far, the Delites are very comfortable for me to use and sharp across the field of view, so I am happy. 


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#35 Jaimo!

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 08:39 PM

Very cooI ! experienced that way back when the original Nagler "Type Zero" 13mm was launched. Ummm... I believe I have all of the Naglers now... and more... and more...    Tom

Type 1 Smoothies, there were no "Type Zeros".

 

Nagler Mythos...


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#36 TOMDEY

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 09:03 PM

Type 1 Smoothies, there were no "Type Zeros".

 

Nagler Mythos...

I call those very early ones zeros, to differentiate them from the (later!) ones that have more metal up top to hold that rubber eye cup on. So, in that sense, the type zeros have more Effective Eye Relief (another phrase that I made up!) Sometimes, when a word(s) is needed, time to get creative and invent one! Actually, that is the etymology of language itself!

 

On the other hand... I continue to call Pluto a planet, in deference to my hero, Clyde Tombaugh, and despite the retro-demotion imposed by professional astronomers.    Tom


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#37 SandyHouTex

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 08:53 AM

I call those very early ones zeros, to differentiate them from the (later!) ones that have more metal up top to hold that rubber eye cup on. So, in that sense, the type zeros have more Effective Eye Relief (another phrase that I made up!) Sometimes, when a word(s) is needed, time to get creative and invent one! Actually, that is the etymology of language itself!

 

On the other hand... I continue to call Pluto a planet, in deference to my hero, Clyde Tombaugh, and despite the retro-demotion imposed by professional astronomers.    Tom

I’m with you on the “Pluto is a planet” thing.


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#38 25585

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 09:12 AM

My lineup is similar, 24 pan, 19 pan, 18 radian, 14 radian, 10 rad, 8 rad, and 6 rad. If you don't need the full 20mm E/R you may like the 19 pan over the 18.2 D.

I wish TV did longer FL Delites, some 20-somethings like 23mm & 28mm. 


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#39 Jaimo!

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:08 AM

I call those very early ones zeros, to differentiate them from the (later!) ones that have more metal up top to hold that rubber eye cup on. So, in that sense, the type zeros have more Effective Eye Relief (another phrase that I made up!) Sometimes, when a word(s) is needed, time to get creative and invent one! Actually, that is the etymology of language itself!

 

On the other hand... I continue to call Pluto a planet, in deference to my hero, Clyde Tombaugh, and despite the retro-demotion imposed by professional astronomers.    Tom

The only reason I corrected you is many people search these fora, sometimes years later, looking for answers or researching a topic.  When you creatively "invent" words, it passes mis-information, just because you cannot accurately and correctly describe the history of these eyepieces.  For the record, these eyepieces are known throughout the rest of the amateur astronomy community as Type 1 Naglers.  I am missing the 13mm, the first available, in the photo below.    

 

TV Naglers T1 - small.jpg

 

Jaimo!


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#40 TOMDEY

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 10:58 AM

The only reason I corrected you is many people search these fora, sometimes years later, looking for answers or researching a topic.  When you creatively "invent" words, it passes mis-information, just because you cannot accurately and correctly describe the history of these eyepieces.  For the record, these eyepieces are known throughout the rest of the amateur astronomy community as Type 1 Naglers.  I am missing the 13mm, the first available, in the photo below.    

 

attachicon.gif TV Naglers T1 - small.jpg

 

Jaimo!

Hi, Jaimo; wow nice collection there! The 13mm was my favorite eyepiece for over a decade and hundreds of all-nighter observing sessions with the 29-inch F/4.5 up at the dome. I'll keep referring to it as type zero; people here know it's colorful poetic license.   Tom



#41 Miranda2525

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 11:05 AM

The only reason I corrected you is many people search these fora, sometimes years later, looking for answers or researching a topic.  When you creatively "invent" words, it passes mis-information, just because you cannot accurately and correctly describe the history of these eyepieces.  For the record, these eyepieces are known throughout the rest of the amateur astronomy community as Type 1 Naglers.  I am missing the 13mm, the first available, in the photo below.    

 

attachicon.gif TV Naglers T1 - small.jpg

 

Jaimo!

Definitely Type 1's. There is no such thing as Type "zero". Very nice set you have there !!! 


Edited by Miranda2525, 14 September 2019 - 11:05 AM.


#42 brentknight

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 10:31 AM

When I bought mine, it was a Nagler 9mm. If you let me know what I should call it now, I will comply. 

 

Edit:

I enjoyed the article posted in the link. I see and agree with the logic behind Type 1, but they are clearly different in appearance. So...  call them Type 1 Smoothies?


Edited by brentknight, 15 September 2019 - 10:54 AM.


#43 NorthernlatAK

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 11:00 AM

I love my 9mm "type zero". It's the first and only nagler I currently own.

#44 Jaimo!

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 12:21 PM

Here's another good article:

 

The eyepiece that changed observing

 

and Ed Ting's website is very informative:

 

http://www.scopereviews.com/page2.html


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#45 RadioAstronomer

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 03:30 PM

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#46 Scott in NC

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:28 PM

 

Welcome to the Dark Side -- we have invested all of our retirement money in high quality oculars…. and we love them! lol.gif

 

Yes, you may indeed have invested your retirement money in high quality, high dollar oculars.  Fortunately, one can buy them used, and if the funds are ever needed, you can sell the eyepieces off one by one for about the same price that you paid for them.  So the money really isn't gone, just temporarily transitioned into a form that you can use and enjoy.  :ubetcha:


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#47 jjack's

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 03:18 AM

is there any type -1 ? smile.gif

And Pluto is a planet but a dwarf one because i am uneable to see it into my naglers  set tonofbricks.gif


Edited by jjack's, 16 September 2019 - 03:29 AM.


#48 BGazing

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 03:25 AM

I've innocently bought 3.5mm T6 for my Borg.

I currently have 3.5, 5mm, 7mm, 11mm (now discontinued but I got it from RAKing) and 13mm.

Help!

Actually, do not help...I will add 9mm to have a complete set (no use for 2.5mm).

The thing is, there might be better EPs individually and better designs, but to have those little fellas in your pockets, warming up in cold weather and ready to go and to have such punch in small package when travelling...hard to beat. They work in all scopes, even when you do not realize you will use them down the line. 

I might add a f/5 dob soon and it being ultraportable the only way to balance with Paracorr is with...T6s.


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#49 Starman1

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 01:16 PM

I call those very early ones zeros, to differentiate them from the (later!) ones that have more metal up top to hold that rubber eye cup on. So, in that sense, the type zeros have more Effective Eye Relief (another phrase that I made up!) Sometimes, when a word(s) is needed, time to get creative and invent one! Actually, that is the etymology of language itself!

 

On the other hand... I continue to call Pluto a planet, in deference to my hero, Clyde Tombaugh, and despite the retro-demotion imposed by professional astronomers.    Tom

The funny thing is that the kids wouldn't have minded at all if the solar system grew to 23 or more planets--they'd know all the names sooner than the old guys like us.

There are many reasons why the term "dwarf planet" is an arbitrary one.  The term planet is still there, and it is quite small, like Ceres, but it's round from gravitation and 

has some activity going on in its structure.

Now, keeping Pluto as a planet and not letting any of the other round outer bodies be classified as planets is not particularly a smart classification.

So, let's simply go to 23 or more planets right away.  Why not? The number of satellites of the outer planets seem to multiply weekly, so why not planets.

It's the 21st century and we're discovering planets around other stars too.

 

A couple more points to be made about Nagler eyepieces.  Lab tests of the first ones showed an 84° field, not 82°.  That's interesting.

And the designs for the Type II Naglers predate the Meade Series 4000 UWAs, which is also interesting.

Some day, someone will have to write a modern chronology of eyepieces, but there are so many now, the task would be daunting.


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#50 Scott in NC

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 01:43 PM

Some day, someone will have to write a modern chronology of eyepieces, but there are so many now, the task would be daunting.

Didn't Bill Paolini do something like that?  Or maybe he didn't get into the history / chronology of the numerous eyepiece types.  I admit that I've never seen a copy of his book, which is something that I need to rectify one day.




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