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Any info on locating Triton?

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#1 InkDark

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 12:32 PM

Hi,

 

Is there any info on locating Triton on any given night? Any charts or article for months to come would be a good help.

 

Second question: Anyone ever saw Triton in a 10 inch?



#2 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 12:36 PM

Best time to see it would be when it is at elongation (furthest angular separation) from Saturn.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 05 September 2019 - 12:37 PM.


#3 B 26354

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 12:55 PM

Best time to see it would be when it is at elongation (furthest angular separation) from Saturn.

Triton's furthest angular separation from Saturn is gonna be rather large just now, since Saturn is in Sagittarius, and Triton -- Neptune's largest satellite -- is in Aquarius. grin.gif


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#4 fcathell

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 01:02 PM

Whoops!


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#5 Jim Davis

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 01:08 PM

How about S&T's tracker: https://www.skyandte...riton-tracker/#


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#6 Gary Z

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 01:13 PM

If you have software like Stellarium, you can actually zoom in on the planets and observe the position of the moon.  One thing to remember about Saturn, is that while it is an awesome object to view in the telescope, it is about twice as far as Jupiter is, roughly 746 million miles.  While Triton is a big moon, it can easily be missed.  But with Stellarium, you can input any day, month, or year and check the night sky for that date, and then zoom in to see the moon of the planets.

 

Gary


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#7 InkDark

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 02:07 PM

If you have software like Stellarium, you can actually zoom in on the planets and observe the position of the moon.  One thing to remember about Saturn, is that while it is an awesome object to view in the telescope, it is about twice as far as Jupiter is, roughly 746 million miles.  While Triton is a big moon, it can easily be missed.  But with Stellarium, you can input any day, month, or year and check the night sky for that date, and then zoom in to see the moon of the planets.

 

Gary

Wow, shame on me...yes I do have installed Stellarium, but I never thought using it to locate Triton.

 

Observing planets has been a while for me (from my latitude).  



#8 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 02:13 PM

If you have software like Stellarium, you can actually zoom in on the planets and observe the position of the moon.  One thing to remember about Saturn, is that while it is an awesome object to view in the telescope, it is about twice as far as Jupiter is, roughly 746 million miles.  While Triton is a big moon, it can easily be missed.  But with Stellarium, you can input any day, month, or year and check the night sky for that date, and then zoom in to see the moon of the planets.

 

Gary

 

The subject is Neptune's largest satellite Triton, not Titan. wink.gif 



#9 earlyriser

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 02:13 PM

There appears to be some confusion here.

 

Triton = Moon of Neptune

Titan = Moon of Saturn


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#10 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 02:35 PM

Hi,

 

Is there any info on locating Triton on any given night? Any charts or article for months to come would be a good help.

 

Second question: Anyone ever saw Triton in a 10 inch?

I observed Neptune as it closed in on Phi Aquarii last night using a 17" classical Cassegrain.

https://www.cloudyni...i/#entry9621687

The transparency was starting to degrade due to clouds heading northward from Hurricane Dorian and I was unable to see Triton, which I have observed in the past with that telescope.   

I suppose your 10" should be able to reveal Triton with sufficient magnification from a good dark site.  It certainly is possible in theory.  

https://www.skyandte...riton-tracker/#

Dave Mitsky

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  • Neptune & Triton September 4.PNG


#11 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 02:52 PM

Sorry, yes, Neptunian Triton and not Saturnian Titan.  I was wondering why you needed such a large aperture to see Titan :-O .

 

But the principle is the same.  The best time to view most satellites is when they have the largest angular separation from their brighter host body.

 

I can't find an elongation calculator for Triton online unfortunately.  But elongations should happen about twice every orbital period (about once every 2.94 days).  You can see visually on Stellarium when the elongations happen by fastforwarding time, but an actual elongation calculator would be more precise.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 05 September 2019 - 03:04 PM.


#12 beggarly

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 03:29 PM

Use NASA's Horizons web-interface to generate an ephemeris:

https://ssd.jpl.nasa...ons.cgi#results


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#13 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 03:54 PM

Use NASA's Horizons web-interface to generate an ephemeris:

https://ssd.jpl.nasa...ons.cgi#results

It looks like that will compute the angular separation between Neptune and Triton but not the actual dates and times of the elongations.

 

It should be added that the best time to view Triton will be when it is both at elongation with Neptune and also highest in altitude angle.  Not sure what program would be able to a) compute when the elongations happen, and then b) eliminate elongations that are too low in altitude angle.  Those would be the best times to try to see Triton (or Titan, or Phobos), especially with a smaller aperture.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 05 September 2019 - 04:09 PM.


#14 NinePlanets

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 08:18 PM

Yes. You can see Triton in a 10" Newtonian. I was actually observing it last Friday and Saturday nights with my 10" F/6, confirming its position angle with Stellarium mobile. It is roughly the same brightness as Pluto.

Poor seeing will render it invisible. Be under a dark, contrasty sky. Use magnification in the 200-300X range. High magnification helps a lot. (It was NOT visible with 7mm eyepiece but WAS easily visible with a 5mm.)




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