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Which are the rarest refractors?

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#76 Tyson M

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 09:25 PM

5" f/22 custom D&G refractor. 

Im not yet 50 years old. I have no business owning a scope like this. The guys who've been in the hobby longer than I'm alive should have something like this. 

Whoa, you own this monster???



#77 Lucullus

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 12:04 PM

A rather rare scope:


What telescope is this?

#78 gnowellsct

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 09:43 PM

5" f/22 custom D&G refractor.
Im not yet 50 years old. I have no business owning a scope like this. The guys who've been in the hobby longer than I'm alive should have something like this.


It's strange and it frightens me
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#79 ltha

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 08:55 AM

What telescope is this?

It is a Takahashi FCT-125, a 5” f/5.6 triplet. A friend in Japan found it and contacted me after which I called Art at TNR ( the US Takahashi importer). I had read somewhere that approximately 40 were made, but Art told me he believed that 9 or fewer was closer to the number. Needless to say, I bought it. 

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#80 Nippon

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 09:33 AM

There are approximately 33 of the TV-140.  I have #33. 

That's the best looking TV 140 I've seen. Most I've seen photos of are on TV mounts with that rather odd looking tube clamp. I understand why it was like that but it just did not have that clean Tele Vue look. Did you have trouble finding tube rings for your 140?



#81 Kent10

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 10:00 AM

That's the best looking TV 140 I've seen. Most I've seen photos of are on TV mounts with that rather odd looking tube clamp. I understand why it was like that but it just did not have that clean Tele Vue look. Did you have trouble finding tube rings for your 140?

Thanks!  The tube rings came with the scope when I purchased it used.  I think they are the Parallax rings.  The 140 is very light for 140mm and balances well on the DM-4 because of the Petzval design.



#82 gnowellsct

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 10:19 AM

The rarest refractors are the ones that are cooked the least, almost raw.


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#83 csrlice12

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 10:34 AM

From the Television pizza documentaries....there are no pizza refractors that will provide views of the Martian ant colonies, it takes a newtonian to do that.



#84 Terra Nova

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 11:06 AM

I got this a week or so ago. It's a ~20? y.o. F6.5 Vixen ED102SS. I'm told it's pretty rare.

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#85 vahe

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 04:36 PM

5" f/22 custom D&G refractor. 

Im not yet 50 years old. I have no business owning a scope like this. The guys who've been in the hobby longer than I'm alive should have something like this. 

I have been in the hobby longer than 50 years!

 

After I saw this picture I checked some old D&G catalogs in my collection, here is what D&G offered back in the old days.
They listed 5”, 6”, 8” 10” and 12” achromats, all were offered in F/12 and F/15.
They also offered “ All New” F ratios for the above listed sizes in F/20 and F/25 at the same price.

.
My guess is that the super long F ratios were intended primarily for finder/guide scopes to be mounted on giant pro telescopes, I always wondered how an F/20 would work in the real world as a stand alone planetary refractor, would there be any cooling problems due to long metal tube, the above picture is only a 5” aperture just think what a 10” or an 8” would look like.

.
But I did not give up the idea, instead of a giant F/20 refractor I got myself a 10” and a 8” F/20 Maksutovs with 22% co., comparing to my 6” apo these Maks produce planetary images with contrast comparable to the apo, and before I am reminded of Maksutov’s stubborn cooling issues, a good insulation wrap solves the problem.

.

Vahe


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#86 The Ardent

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 04:46 PM

Vahe

 

You owned telescopes consistent with your years in the hobby, proper and correct. 

 

This scope was from the estate of Dr Green, who owned some giant D&G trailer mounted refractors (from what I've heard) I believe this one was a finder or guide. It made an excellent scope on its own, except for portability issues. 

 

The new owner is a grandmother in Ohio with a permanent mount. Someone with years in the hobby and zeal for nice refractors. A good match! 


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#87 Esso2112

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 10:22 PM

It is a Takahashi FCT-125, a 5” f/5.6 triplet. A friend in Japan found it and contacted me after which I called Art at TNR ( the US Takahashi importer). I had read somewhere that approximately 40 were made, but Art told me he believed that 9 or fewer was closer to the number. Needless to say, I bought it. 

Glad to see you’re still enjoying yours. I love mine.



#88 Tyson M

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 10:24 PM

It is a Takahashi FCT-125, a 5” f/5.6 triplet. A friend in Japan found it and contacted me after which I called Art at TNR ( the US Takahashi importer). I had read somewhere that approximately 40 were made, but Art told me he believed that 9 or fewer was closer to the number. Needless to say, I bought it.


Very nice! What a rare scope!

#89 Castor

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 07:33 PM

I got this a week or so ago. It's a ~20? y.o. F6.5 Vixen ED102SS. I'm told it's pretty rare.

 

Congratulations Terra, it looks brand new as if it had been frozen in time, I suppose finding one in that condition was serendipitous! drool5.gif  

 

I loved looking at the pictures of these attractive refractors setup on their matching Vixen GP and GPDX mounts on the Orion Telescopes & Binoculars catalogs from the late 90’s (I still keep them to reminisce). love.gif  


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#90 Lucullus

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 05:24 AM

What about the Vixen ED114SS of these old days? Is it rare?



#91 Corcaroli78

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 08:41 AM

APQ 100/640: About 40.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

Too few APQ´s 100/640  ??

 

Then I must consider myself really lucky to have touched and briefly tested one of them in Copenhagen. The helical focuser is massive and very very high quality, like nothing that i have seen before.

 

Carlos


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#92 Marcus Roman

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 10:39 AM

It is a Takahashi FCT-125, a 5” f/5.6 triplet. A friend in Japan found it and contacted me after which I called Art at TNR ( the US Takahashi importer). I had read somewhere that approximately 40 were made, but Art told me he believed that 9 or fewer was closer to the number. Needless to say, I bought it. 

Bautifuuuuullll!  Wow, really rare...maybe a bit O.T., sorry, but may I ask you how it performs visually in comparison with other apo flourite doublets? Thanks.


Edited by Marcus Roman, 04 October 2019 - 10:40 AM.

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#93 dothead

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 03:47 PM

... I always wondered how an F/20 would work in the real world as a stand alone planetary refractor, would there be any cooling problems due to long metal tube ...

Cooling time is independent of tube length !



#94 Esso2112

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Posted 04 October 2019 - 04:35 PM

Bautifuuuuullll!  Wow, really rare...maybe a bit O.T., sorry, but may I ask you how it performs visually in comparison with other apo flourite doublets? Thanks.

 

I also have the FCT-125 and used to own a FS-128. So, I have flourite triplet vs doublet experience. Unfortunately, I had sold the FS-128 before I got the FCT, so no direct side by side comparison. The doublets have a minor amount of CA on very bright stars like Sirius. The triplets do not have any CA that I have seen. The doublets are a small step below the triplets in terms of CA (only really bright stars, Venus) and cool down faster. I have considered a FCT-150 several times when they have come up for sale, but I just could’t convince myself it would be that big of a leap over my FS-152 to justify the cost difference. 

 

Ltha had both the FC-125 and the FCT-125 and did compare them as I recall, and he still has the FCT-125. I know he sold one of his FC-125’s. 


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#95 Gavster

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 02:35 PM

I think the Baader 95mm travel companion refractors are pretty rare.
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#96 Tyson M

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Posted 05 October 2019 - 03:17 PM

I think the Baader 95mm travel companion refractors are pretty rare.

Agreed, absolutely love this scope. 



#97 ltha

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 03:21 PM

Bautifuuuuullll!  Wow, really rare...maybe a bit O.T., sorry, but may I ask you how it performs visually in comparison with other apo flourite doublets? Thanks.

I have not done much observing this summer, other than DSOs. Now that it finally gets dark earlier and stays dark longer I hope to get out more. The TEC200ED has my Losmandy HGM-200 booked so I only have the NJP to use with the FC-125  and FCT-125. Kurt’s experience is mine as well - the triplet is better color corrected, and every bit as sharp. The focal length differences are a minor issue but next time I will pull out the Tak 1.6 extender.

 

Notes from a session a while back:

 

I decided to give the FCT-125 a try so I took the FC-125 off of the HGM-200 and mounted the FCT. Right out of the box, and with essentially no cool-down it was giving great images of the Moon. Very sharp and contrasty. I was actually shocked at how good the image was, though I do not know why. To check for color correction I ran the image in and out of both sides of focus – nothing! Obviously in-focus was totally color free. I also moved the image around the field of view to see if there was significant field curvature - nothing noticeable. What was noticeable was the incredibly shallow depth of focus – the slightest movement of the focus knob meant the difference between in-focus and out of focus. Not a great depth of field in a 5” f/5.6, but the big focuser on the FCT is smooth and precise and focusing was a pretty easy.

 

Saturn was just below the Moon so I swung the FCT over to it. The image scale was pretty small, but it was a nice image, far better than the 16” R-C at “Hopservatory” we visited a week ago. I tried all the eyepieces I had, but the shortest was a Pentax XW 5mm which ran at 140x. I did not have the HGM tracking which was a mistake.

 

Out of curiosity I changed scopes and spent some time with the FC-125 for comparison. The image scale of the longer focal length scope was more pleasing, but sharpness on the Moon was a push. Reaching focus was easier in the FC, but once reached you would be hard pressed to tell any difference. The FC is really well corrected for color - I racked the focuser in and out could just tease a slight, and I mean slight fringe of faint yellow/green on one side of focus and faint purple on the other. I had to work to see the colors they were so slight. No color at all in-focus. Nada.

 

The Moon looked great in everything I threw at it up to the 5mm XW at 200x. The 6mm Delos was very sharp, nearly as sharp as the Pentax. Turning to Saturn I was immediately struck by the beautiful image. It would be hard to say it was sharper than the FCT, but the image scale and ease of focusing certainly made it appear more detailed. Cloud belts on the globe, Cassini’s, etc were all clear as was Titan. Titan was also clear in the FCT so, again, a longer test with the mount drives on is in order.

 

Hercules was nicely placed so I swung the FC to M13. It never ceases to amaze me how the superior contrast of refractors seemed to allow them to perform above their actual aperture – M13 was wonderful, clearly a ball of pinpoint start.


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#98 Marcus Roman

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 04:17 PM

I have not done much observing this summer, other than DSOs. Now that it finally gets dark earlier and stays dark longer I hope to get out more. The TEC200ED has my Losmandy HGM-200 booked so I only have the NJP to use with the FC-125  and FCT-125. Kurt’s experience is mine as well - the triplet is better color corrected, and every bit as sharp. The focal length differences are a minor issue but next time I will pull out the Tak 1.6 extender.

 

Notes from a session a while back:

 

I decided to give the FCT-125 a try so I took the FC-125 off of the HGM-200 and mounted the FCT. Right out of the box, and with essentially no cool-down it was giving great images of the Moon. Very sharp and contrasty. I was actually shocked at how good the image was, though I do not know why. To check for color correction I ran the image in and out of both sides of focus – nothing! Obviously in-focus was totally color free. I also moved the image around the field of view to see if there was significant field curvature - nothing noticeable. What was noticeable was the incredibly shallow depth of focus – the slightest movement of the focus knob meant the difference between in-focus and out of focus. Not a great depth of field in a 5” f/5.6, but the big focuser on the FCT is smooth and precise and focusing was a pretty easy.

 

Saturn was just below the Moon so I swung the FCT over to it. The image scale was pretty small, but it was a nice image, far better than the 16” R-C at “Hopservatory” we visited a week ago. I tried all the eyepieces I had, but the shortest was a Pentax XW 5mm which ran at 140x. I did not have the HGM tracking which was a mistake.

 

Out of curiosity I changed scopes and spent some time with the FC-125 for comparison. The image scale of the longer focal length scope was more pleasing, but sharpness on the Moon was a push. Reaching focus was easier in the FC, but once reached you would be hard pressed to tell any difference. The FC is really well corrected for color - I racked the focuser in and out could just tease a slight, and I mean slight fringe of faint yellow/green on one side of focus and faint purple on the other. I had to work to see the colors they were so slight. No color at all in-focus. Nada.

 

The Moon looked great in everything I threw at it up to the 5mm XW at 200x. The 6mm Delos was very sharp, nearly as sharp as the Pentax. Turning to Saturn I was immediately struck by the beautiful image. It would be hard to say it was sharper than the FCT, but the image scale and ease of focusing certainly made it appear more detailed. Cloud belts on the globe, Cassini’s, etc were all clear as was Titan. Titan was also clear in the FCT so, again, a longer test with the mount drives on is in order.

 

Hercules was nicely placed so I swung the FC to M13. It never ceases to amaze me how the superior contrast of refractors seemed to allow them to perform above their actual aperture – M13 was wonderful, clearly a ball of pinpoint start.

Thanks for sharing! One day I would love to have one FC/FCT 125!


Edited by Marcus Roman, 06 October 2019 - 04:17 PM.


#99 ltha

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 06:02 PM

My pleasure! The FCT-125 is very hard to find. The FC-125J is another that does not come up often, but what a beautiful  scope. Both of the FC-125s I have owned had excellent optics, real performers. 

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Edited by ltha, 06 October 2019 - 06:05 PM.

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#100 ltha

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Posted 06 October 2019 - 07:03 PM

I have not run across many of these either: Pentax 105 SD f/9.5. I see you have one too! Great scope.

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Edited by ltha, 06 October 2019 - 07:09 PM.

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